Doctor retrieves COVID-19 data from deleted NIH archive

FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Feb. 6, 2021, a worker in protectively overalls and carrying disinfecting equipment walks outside the Wuhan Central Hospital where Li Wenliang, the whistleblower doctor who sounded the alarm and was reprimanded by local police for it in the early days of Wuhan's pandemic, worked in Wuhan in central China. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, FILE)

FILE – In this file photo dated Saturday, Feb. 6, 2021, a worker in protectively overalls and carrying disinfecting equipment walks outside the Wuhan Central Hospital in central China. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, FILE)

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UPDATED 8:46 AM PT – Thursday, June 24, 2021

Anthony Fauci’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) is found to have deleted the coronavirus genome data amid ongoing investigations into its origins.

In his new study, Dr. Jesse Bloom of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle said he has retrieved the early genome data for COVID-19 from a digital archive at the NIH. Bloom said the recovered data includes gene sequences from virus samples collected in Wuhan in early 2020 and it shows COVID-19 circulated among the public well before the pandemic was announced.

“Coronaviruses are the only RNA viruses with a proofreading…meaning they have a mutation rate that is somewhat lower than the mutation rate of something that might influence a virus,” he explained.

Dr. Bloom went on to argue that analyzing early COVID-19 data is very important to defeat the illness.

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