Gov. Kemp: Moving MLB All-Star Game Hurts Atlanta’s ‘Little Guy’

Gov. Kemp: Moving MLB All-Star Game Hurts Atlanta's 'Little Guy' brian kemp speaks into mic Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp speaks to the media before health care workers received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine outside of the Chatham County Health Department on December 15, 2020 in Savannah, Georgia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Tuesday, 06 April 2021 02:57 PM

Major League Baseball's decision to move its All-Star Game from Atlanta to Denver is hurting the "little guy" while not changing anything about Georgia's election law, Gov. Brian Kemp said Tuesday

"I will tell you who is getting screwed, it's the little guy working in these bars and taverns and hotels that are not going to have guests," the Republican leader told Fox News' "America Reports." "I will tell you, people in Georgia, people that don't normally follow politics, they know somebody is lying to us, and it's not me."

Instead, it's people like former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, who lost to Kemp, and a "lot of these other people" who are lying about the voting bill and its requirements on voter identification, polling times, and more, he said

Meanwhile, companies that are protesting the bill are against it because "they got pressure by cancel culture," including from CEOs who live in states that are "more restrictive than we are."

"These board members need to get to the truth about what's in the bill," said Kemp.

Meanwhile, the game is being moved to Denver, which has far fewer Black people, 9% of the population, than in Atlanta, where the population is 51% Black, and Kemp said that is "almost comical," especially considering Denver's voting law has many similarities to the Georgia law that has come under fire.

Colorado not only has fewer voting days than Georgia, said Kemp, but also requires photo IDs for in-person voting, like Georgia's bill.

"We compared us to where Major League Baseball is headquartered, and I've talked to that issue ad nauseam about the discrepancies and how they are boycotting and pulling games out of a state like ours," said Kemp. "Yet they are headquartered in a state that's more restrictive than ours. It doesn't add up."

He also slammed criticism about a part of the bill that does not allow food or water to be given to voters standing in line, noting that it was put there because people are giving out refreshments to campaign to people waiting to vote.

"We are not going to allow voters to be harassed and intimidated while they are in line," said Kemp. "That law has been in place in Georgia for a long time and the real question is, why are people standing in line two, three, four, five, or six hours where they would even need food or water? It is because of the Democratic counties they are in, not moving the process along."

Such counties, he said, "don't have enough equipment, they don't have enough people, they have to train people properly. The general assembly in this law addresses that issue where people are in these long lines and the county has to make changes and solve that problem."

However, three weeks ago, activists were complaining more about taking away Sunday voting or not allowing no-excuse absentee ballots, as "their argument continues to change."

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