Harris Differs From Biden on Placing Blame for Prolonged Pandemic

Harris Differs From Biden on Placing Blame for Prolonged Pandemic Kamala Harris speaks at the White House U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during an infrastructure announcement at AFL-CIO in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 16. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

By Jeffrey Rodack | Tuesday, 21 December 2021 08:11 AM

Unlike President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris is refusing to blame the unvaccinated for the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.

In an interview with "CBS Evening News" on Monday, Harris was asked if it is the fault of the unvaccinated.

She responded: "I don't think this is a moment to talk about fault. It is no one’s fault this virus hit our shores or hit the world, but it is more about individual power and responsibility and it’s about the decisions that everyone has the choice to make, no doubt.”

Harris added: "We have the power today to go out and if you've not been boosted, go get boosted. The power today to go and get vaccinated. And that will have an impact on where we end up tomorrow."

Her comments are in sharp contrast to Biden, who remarked in September: “This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. And it’s caused by the fact that despite America having an unprecedented and successful vaccination program, despite the fact that for almost five months free vaccines have been available in 80,000 different locations, we still have nearly 80 million Americans who have failed to get the shot.

“And to make matters worse, there are elected officials actively working to undermine the fight against COVID-19. Instead of encouraging people to get vaccinated and mask up, they’re ordering mobile morgues for the unvaccinated dying from COVID in their communities. This is totally unacceptable.”

Harris’ remarks came as public health officials are expressing fear of a major surge of infections as a result of the Christmas and New Year’s holidays.

Reuters reported that the omicron variant now accounts for 73% of U.S. COVID-19 infections, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Original Article