Wash. man caught texting on plane about molesting children sentenced to 15 year in prison

58-year-old Michael Kellar, left, was sentenced to 15 years for conspiracy to produce child pornography. 52-year-old Lynn Burnworth, right, pleaded guilty to distribution of child pornography. (Mugshots via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 8:14 PM PT — Friday, February 21, 2020

A Washington man who was recently caught texting about molesting children on an airplane is set to spend 15 years behind bars. 58-year-old Michael Kellar was seen messaging his girlfriend while on a Southwest Airlines flight from Seattle to San Jose back in 2017.

In the exchange they discussed drugging and raping two children ages five and seven. A fellow passenger snapped a photo of Kellar’s phone and alerted flight attendants.

“(He) had a very large cellphone and the font was enlarged all the way up,” explained Capt. Mike Edwards of the Seattle Police Department (Internet Crimes Against Children Unit). “The discussion that was going on was very disturbing about harm to children.”

Police were called and met the plane as it landed in San Jose. An investigation later revealed that both Kellar and his girlfriend had produced and shared child sex-abuse images. Those photos were also found on both his laptop and phone.

After Kellar’s arrest authorities praised the woman who saw the texts. She was later identified as a preschool teacher and was hailed a hero by police.

“If it wasn’t for this particular passenger taking action, taking initiative, to alert the staff and alert police, this catastrophic event would have been just horrific.,” said Detective Sgt. Brian Spears of the San Jose Police Department. “Her actions, her being a hero; in my eyes she is our hero.”

Kellar pleaded guilty last year and will be required to register as a sex-offender upon his release. His girlfriend, 52-year-old Gail Lynn Burnworth, also pleaded guilty to distribution of child sex-abuse images. She’s set to be sentenced in march.

The FBI is still investigating the case with help from local law enforcement in both San Jose and Seattle.

RELATED: More women come forward to accuse former gynecologist of sexual assault

Original Article

Parents of Parkland shooting victim sue FBI for failing to investigate tips about gunman

FILE – In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:18 AM PT — Friday, February 14, 2020

The family of one of the victims from the 2018 Parkland school shooting has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the FBI.

The Pollack family filed suit on Wednesday, alleging that the bureau knew the accused gunman had “the desire and capability to carry out a mass school shooting,” but it failed to take any action to stop him.

The family specifically claimed the FBI had information Nikolas Cruz was collecting ammunition right before the shooting took place on Valentine’s Day two years ago.

This comes after the Pollack’s also filed suit against a former county sheriff deputy, who failed to enter the school building while the shooting took place.

“How many schools, how many children have to get shot?” asked Andrew Pollack. “It stops here with this administration and me, I’m not going to sleep until it’s fixed.”

Andrew Pollack, the father of Meadow Pollack, listens during the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission meeting Thursday, Nov 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Pollack’s daughter, Meadow, was 17-years old at the time of the deadly incident. The shooting killed a total 17 students as well as teachers and wounded several others.

The suspected gunman faces multiple counts of first degree murder as well as attempted murder. His trial is expected to begin later this summer.

RELATED: Parkland high school team steps in for Chiefs and 49ers

Original Article

President Trump responds to Attorney General Barr’s remarks about being involved in criminal cases

FILE – In this July 11, 2019, file photo, Attorney General William Barr, left, and President Donald Trump turn to leave after speaking in the Rose Garden of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 8:44 AM PT — Friday, February 14, 2020

President Trump recently responded to Attorney General William Barr’s remarks regarding his involvement in criminal cases. On Friday, the president tweeted about Barr’s interview with ABC News in which he breaks with the president over his Twitter commentary about the Department of Justice.

President Trump repeated Barr’s remarks that he never asked the attorney general to do anything in a criminal case, but he also added it doesn’t mean that he doesn’t have the legal right to do so.

Barr claimed President Trump’s constant Twitter posts about the Justice Department’s criminal cases make it harder for him to do his job.

“The president has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case,” he stated. “However, to have public statements and tweets made about the Department, about people in the Department, make it impossible for me to do my job.”

The attorney general also said he will not be bullied or influenced by anybody, whether it’s Congress, a newspaper editorial board or the President of the United States.

File – White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham is pictured. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

The White House also responded to the recent comments made by attorney general and his role as the nation’s top cop.

In a statement Thursday, White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said President Trump was not bothered at all by Barr’s comments. She added that the attorney general has the right, like any American citizen, to voice his opinion.

Grisham also noted the president has full faith and confidence in the U.S. attorney general.

RELATED: Barr says constant Twitter commentary undercuts me, work at DOJ

Original Article

President Trump on Stone pardon: I don’t want to talk about that yet

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:20 PM PT — Wednesday, February 12, 2020

President Trump is sidestepping questions about whether or not he would issue a pardon to Roger Stone.

On Wednesday, the president was asked if he would grant a pardon to his long-time political adviser. He said he didn’t want to talk about it just yet and proceeded to slam the case as unjust. He added Stone didn’t deserve to have his life destroyed “because nobody even knows what he did.”

“I don’t want to say that yet, but I’ll tell you what, people were hurt viciously and badly by these corrupt people. I want to thank the Justice Department for seeing this, this horrible thing. They saw the horribleness of a nine year sentence for doing nothing. You have murderers and drug addicts, they don’t get nine years. Nine years for doing something that nobody can define what he did. Somebody said he put out a tweet, and the tweet, you based it on that.” – Donald J. Trump, 45th President of the United States

This came after the judge presiding over Stone’s case denied his request for a new trial. A recently unsealed court order showed his defense demanded to strike a juror, who was an IRS lawyer, from the case.

FILE – In this Nov. 7, 2019 file photo, Roger Stone arrives at Federal Court for his federal trial in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Meanwhile, officials in Washington are speaking out on the fallout of the Justice Department’s intervention in the case. President Trump praised their decision to reduce Stone’s recommended prison sentence, but emphasized he was not involved.

“That was a horrible aberration, I think it’s a disgrace,” he said. “No, I have not been involved with it at all.”

Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley has since repeated the president’s position. On Wednesday, he told reporters President Trump did not tell Attorney General William Barr to do anything regarding Stone’s sentencing.

“Listen, the President of the United States is, by the constitutional definition, the chief law enforcement officer of the land,” stated Gidley. “The fact is, the president didn’t have a conversation with the attorney general at all, but he has the right to do it.”

However, Senate Democrats, who are still raw from the impeachment acquittal, are calling for further investigations into the president’s conduct surrounding Roger Stone’s sentence.

“I have formally requested that the Inspector General of the Justice Department investigate this matter immediately,” stated Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). “This morning, I call on Judiciary Committee Chairman Graham to convene an emergency hearing to do the same.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, speaks during the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative one-year anniversary event event co-hosted by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Senior Advisor to the President, Ivanka Trump, at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez)

Sen. Graham (R-S.C.) said he will not play Schumer’s game. The Judiciary Committee chairman told reporters on Capitol Hill he isn’t planning to request Attorney General Barr to appear and testify in front of his panel.

He explained that Barr would appear for normal oversight hearings, but not for the Stone sentencing.

Despite Graham’s refusal to call Barr to testify, he also told reporters he doesn’t think the president should be commenting on pending sentences.

“He should not be commenting on cases in the system, I’ve said that a bunch,” said Graham. “If I thought he’d done something that had changed the outcome inappropriately, I’d be the first to say.”

This came after the president repeatedly blasted Stone’s prosecution on Twitter, calling the trial “illegal” and a “Mueller scam.” He then congratulated Attorney General Barr for successfully seizing control of the sentencing phase for his long-time political adviser.

MORE NEWS: President Trump Congratulates Attorney General Barr For ‘Taking Charge’ Of Stone Case

Original Article

President Trump on Stone pardon: I don’t want to talk about that yet

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:20 PM PT — Wednesday, February 12, 2020

President Trump is sidestepping questions about whether or not he would issue a pardon to Roger Stone.

On Wednesday, the president was asked if he would grant a pardon to his long-time political adviser. He said he didn’t want to talk about it just yet and proceeded to slam the case as unjust. He added Stone didn’t deserve to have his life destroyed “because nobody even knows what he did.”

“I don’t want to say that yet, but I’ll tell you what, people were hurt viciously and badly by these corrupt people. I want to thank the Justice Department for seeing this, this horrible thing. They saw the horribleness of a nine year sentence for doing nothing. You have murderers and drug addicts, they don’t get nine years. Nine years for doing something that nobody can define what he did. Somebody said he put out a tweet, and the tweet, you based it on that.” – Donald J. Trump, 45th President of the United States

This came after the judge presiding over Stone’s case denied his request for a new trial. A recently unsealed court order showed his defense demanded to strike a juror, who was an IRS lawyer, from the case.

FILE – In this Nov. 7, 2019 file photo, Roger Stone arrives at Federal Court for his federal trial in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Meanwhile, officials in Washington are speaking out on the fallout of the Justice Department’s intervention in the case. President Trump praised their decision to reduce Stone’s recommended prison sentence, but emphasized he was not involved.

“That was a horrible aberration, I think it’s a disgrace,” he said. “No, I have not been involved with it at all.”

Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley has since repeated the president’s position. On Wednesday, he told reporters President Trump did not tell Attorney General William Barr to do anything regarding Stone’s sentencing.

“Listen, the President of the United States is, by the constitutional definition, the chief law enforcement officer of the land,” stated Gidley. “The fact is, the president didn’t have a conversation with the attorney general at all, but he has the right to do it.”

However, Senate Democrats, who are still raw from the impeachment acquittal, are calling for further investigations into the president’s conduct surrounding Roger Stone’s sentence.

“I have formally requested that the Inspector General of the Justice Department investigate this matter immediately,” stated Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). “This morning, I call on Judiciary Committee Chairman Graham to convene an emergency hearing to do the same.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, speaks during the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative one-year anniversary event event co-hosted by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Senior Advisor to the President, Ivanka Trump, at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez)

Sen. Graham (R-S.C.) said he will not play Schumer’s game. The Judiciary Committee chairman told reporters on Capitol Hill he isn’t planning to request Attorney General Barr to appear and testify in front of his panel.

He explained that Barr would appear for normal oversight hearings, but not for the Stone sentencing.

Despite Graham’s refusal to call Barr to testify, he also told reporters he doesn’t think the president should be commenting on pending sentences.

“He should not be commenting on cases in the system, I’ve said that a bunch,” said Graham. “If I thought he’d done something that had changed the outcome inappropriately, I’d be the first to say.”

This came after the president repeatedly blasted Stone’s prosecution on Twitter, calling the trial “illegal” and a “Mueller scam.” He then congratulated Attorney General Barr for successfully seizing control of the sentencing phase for his long-time political adviser.

MORE NEWS: President Trump Congratulates Attorney General Barr For ‘Taking Charge’ Of Stone Case

Original Article

Pompeo warns governors about doing business with China

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo gestures while speaking during his and Belarus Foreign Minister Vladimir Makei join news conference following the talks in Minsk, Belarus, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:15 AM PT — Sunday, February 9, 2020

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is advising governors across the nation to be careful when doing business with China.

“When it comes to doing business, I’m asking you to adopt a cautious mindset,” he said. “In the words of President Reagan, when you are approached for introduction or a connection to a deal, ‘trust, but verify.’”

On Saturday, he warned governors the country could be “targeting individual states” for political and economic gain.

“Competition with China is not just a federal issue, that’s why I wanted to be here today, Governor Hogan,” said Pompeo. “It’s happening in your states with consequences for our foreign policy, for the citizens that reside in your states and, indeed, for each of you.”

FILE – In this Sept. 16, 2018, file photo, American flags are displayed together with Chinese flags in Beijing. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

The secretary noted the Chinese government has “assessed” each governor, ranking them as “friendly, “hardline” or “ambiguous.” He added there are communist China followers in dozens of states across the nation, who are attempting to influence local governments.

“The Chinese government has been methodical in the way it has analyzed our system,” stated Pompeo. “It’s assessed our vulnerabilities and it has decided to exploit our freedom (in order) to gain advantage over us at the federal, state and the local level.”

The U.S. has also pressured partner nations against doing business with Chinese tech company Huawei amid concerns their government is using devices to spy on users.

Original Article

Sen. Paul reads question about whistleblower on Senate floor after Justice Roberts refused to recite it

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020, during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. (AP Photo/ Jacquelyn Martin)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 1:40 PM PT — Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) took to the Senate floor to read the question Supreme Court Justice John Roberts refused to recite during the impeachment trial.

On Tuesday, he stated that the Constitution protects debate and said he thinks the chief justice made a big mistake by not allowing his question about the whistleblower.

The Kentucky Republican also pointed out the law does not preserve the anonymity of whistleblower’s. Sen. Paul specifically named the suspected whistleblower while delivering question.

Sen. Paul said he does not support jailing or firing the whistleblower, however, he continued to point out that lawmaker as well as the American people should know if they and others had biases going into impeachment proceedings.

RELATED:President Trump employs heavyweight defense team as GOP threatens to weaponize witnesses

Original Article

Sen. Paul reads question about whistleblower on Senate floor after Justice Roberts refused to recite it

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020, during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. (AP Photo/ Jacquelyn Martin)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 1:40 PM PT — Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) took to the Senate floor to read the question Supreme Court Justice John Roberts refused to recite during the impeachment trial.

On Tuesday, he stated that the Constitution protects debate and said he thinks the chief justice made a big mistake by not allowing his question about the whistleblower.

The Kentucky Republican also pointed out the law does not preserve the anonymity of whistleblower’s. Sen. Paul specifically named the suspected whistleblower while delivering question.

Sen. Paul said he does not support jailing or firing the whistleblower, however, he continued to point out that lawmaker as well as the American people should know if they and others had biases going into impeachment proceedings.

RELATED:President Trump employs heavyweight defense team as GOP threatens to weaponize witnesses

Original Article

Joe Biden loses cool after being asked about his son’s business dealings in Ukraine

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020, in Dubuque, Iowa. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:05 AM PT — Monday, February 3, 2020

Presidential candidate Joe Biden recently snapped under questioning about his son’s business dealings in Ukraine. On Monday, he defended his son Hunter’s former board position at Burisma Holdings, a major Ukrainian energy company, by claiming he got the job because he is a “very bright guy.”

The former vice president went on to say, “no one’s found anything wrong with his dealings in Ukraine except it was a bad image.” When pressed whether or not the 2020 hopeful agreed about the perception, however, Biden was quick to attack.

Meanwhile, recently released State Department emails have suggested Biden was selling his office to pocket the proceeds of Ukrainian corruption. A February 2016 email used Hunter Biden’s name in order to arrange a meeting between a senior State Department official and Burisma lobbyist Karen Tranmontano.

State Department emails also showed Tranmontano wanted to lobby the U.S. government for Burisma after it faced anti-corruption scrutiny by the Ukrainian government. According to reports, several Democrat witnesses were involved in the Biden-Ukraine corruption and benefited from it.

Republican senators, including Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), have called for a probe into the Bidens’ dealings.

“I can promise you no one has looked at whether or not there was a conflict of interest,” he stated. “No one has taken the time to explain how Hunter Biden got rich in the Ukraine and his father didn’t know anything about it.”

RELATED: New details on Hunter Biden’s ties to foreign entities report

Original Article

President Trump calls Bolton allegations about witholding Ukraine aid ‘false’

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., joined by from left, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., Rep. Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas,, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., and Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 1:53 PM PT — Monday, January 27, 2020

Congressman Adam Schiff appears to be drumming up hype over John Bolton’s latest claims, which could potentially support the Democrat case for impeachment. While talking to reporters Monday, the California lawmaker said Bolton must testify in the impeachment trial, following the leak of a manuscript of his book.

Bolton allegedly claimed President Trump told him he would withhold aid from Ukraine unless it agrees to investigate the Bidens. Rep. Schiff is now hoping Bolton could provide evidence of that.

“He should be placed under oath and this is why we think the testimony should be public,”he stated. “It should be live; let the American people, along with the senators, evaluate John Bolton’s credibility when he testifies and make their own judgement. ”

President Trump denied the claims and said said he never told Bolton he would pressure Ukraine. He believes his former national security adviser is trying to “sell his book” by suggesting the president tied Ukrainian security aide to Democrat investigations.

Bolton has said he is willing to testify in the impeachment trial if subpoenaed, however, it is unclear if the Senate will choose to call him as a witness.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, in Washington, with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Meanwhile, moderate Republicans on the fence about calling witnesses are reportedly under more pressure after the Bolton book leak. According to The Hill, Republicans could see Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) defect and vote in favor of new evidence and witnesses. This follows their comments last week in support of issuing new subpoenas.

Before the Bolton report was released, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), a known swing vote, did not mention whether she backed more witnesses. She said she needs to review her notes to make an informed decision.

Sen. Mike Braun (R-Ind.) suggested Bolton’s credibility could be called into question because he left the White House on bad terms.

It’s unknown at this point whether the Senate has 51 votes to call new witnesses to speak under oath to lawmakers. President Trump has threatened to invoke executive privilege to block Bolton’s testimony and tangle the subpoena for his statement in the courts.

RELATED: President Trump’s approval rating soars amid impeachment trial

Original Article

State attorneys general to meet with DOJ to share information about Google antitrust probe

File – A neon Google logo is seen as employees work at a Google office in Toronto. (REUTERS/Mark Blinch/File Photo)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:46 AM PT — Monday, January 27, 2020

Top federal and state attorneys could be forming a “trust-busting” group against Google. On Sunday, officials announced a group of seven state attorneys general will meet with Justice Department attorneys to share information about their investigation.

The probe is looking into claims of monopolistic behavior by Google and will touch on their control of online advertising as well as search traffic. The meeting is expected to discuss these issues as well as a division of labor of federal and state attorneys.

Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes recently spoke out regarding the investigation.

“There’s no question that Google is the market dominant player when it comes to internet search with nearly 90-percent of a share, and there’s nothing wrong with being the dominant player if it’s done fairly,” he stated. “That’s what our investigation intends to uncover and reveal; whether Google has played by the rules and acted fairly.”

Last year, attorneys general from 48 states along with Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. launched investigations into Google. This came as other giant tech companies like Apple, Amazon and Facebook faced “anti-corruption” investigations from other federal agencies.

Attorney General William Barr commented on the “trust-busting” efforts and said the size as well as bipartisan nature of the coalition reflects the importance of the issue. The group is looking to take a broad approach in their investigation and hopes to cover the platform’s deep roots in other online markets.

File – Attorney General Ashley Moodyof Florida is pictured. (AP Photo)

“Google monitors our online behavior and captures data of every one of us as we navigate the internet, and this investigation will initially focus on the capture of that information and whether Google embedded itself in every level of the online market ad sales to monopolize this industry,” explained Florida Attorney General .

Details of the investigation have been kept quiet from the public. Some reports have speculated the meeting could conclude with the Justice Department and state attorneys general officially joining forces. The meeting is expected to take place later this week.

RELATED: Google finds security flaws in Apple’s web browser

Original Article

Rep. Dingell says Trump’s remark about late husband ‘crossed a line’, hopes for more ‘civility’ in politics

closeRep. Dingell on Trump's comments about her late husband, Pelosi's decision to withhold articles of impeachmentVideo

Rep. Dingell on Trump's comments about her late husband, Pelosi's decision to withhold articles of impeachment

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, co-chair of the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee, joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., responded to President Trump's recent remark about her late husband Rep. John Dingell, citing it as an example of an increasingly toxic political culture.

Trump, who honored the late congressman when he died in February, implied that he may be in hell when he said at a Michigan campaign rally, "maybe he's looking up" — instead of down from heaven. Members of both parties criticized the president's comment, which came after Dingell voted to impeach him.

HOUSE DEM BLASTS TRUMP AFTER ATTACK ON JOHN DINGELL: 'HELL WILL BE TOO GOOD FOR HIM'

"We have to learn in our country that you can disagree agreeably," Dingell told "Fox News Sunday," recognizing where the president may have been coming from. "I understand that this impeachment was a very personal issue to him, but I think there are lines that you don't cross, and I think he crossed a line there."

Neither Trump nor any White House representatives have apologized for his comment, but Dingell said she is not interested in an apology.

"What I do want is people to take a deep breath and think, going forward, that their words have consequences, that they can hurt, and how do we bring more civility back to our political environment," she said.

Immediately prior to his crack about the late congressman, Trump said that Mrs. Dingell had called him to thank him for honoring her husband. Sunday, she noted that she was not the one who made the call but acknowledged her gratitude.

"He called me to tell me he was lowering the flags, and to this day, to this minute, I'm grateful that he did it," she said. "I was grateful for the call, he was kind and empathetic, and it meant a lot to somebody who was hurting and loved her husband."

Dingell then read words her husband wrote after the death of President George H.W. Bush, which were in line with her message.

"We both shared deep concern about the hateful taunts, the despicable actions and language that plague our political culture," she quoted.

"He was worried about this country," she said. "And he wanted us to know that we all have responsibility for it."

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Dingell ended the segment on a positive note, expressing a desire to spread goodness.

"I would like to tell the president and everybody else to just be a little kinder," she said, noting that "random acts of kindness can make somebody's day a whole lot better."

Original Article

Pence chief of staff not worried about Pelosi impeachment tactics: ‘She will yield’

closeMarc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol HillVideo

Marc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol Hill

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, showed confidence in the face of the current impeachment strategy being employed by House Democrats led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, stating that, ultimately, he believes they will be the first ones to budge and move what he called a "political exercise" closer to its conclusion.

Pelosi and most of the other Democrats in the House approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump last week for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, yet they have sat on those articles instead of delivering them to the Senate for a trial. Pelosi has claimed that she is waiting for the Republican-controlled Senate to set the process for the trial before she appoints impeachment managers. Meanwhile, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., pushes for the ability to issue subpoenas for additional witnesses and documents.

TRUMP BLASTS HOUSE DEMOCRATS OVER IMPEACHMENT: 'THEY HAD NOTHING, THERE'S NO CRIME'

"I think her position is really untenable," Short told "Fox News Sunday," later predicting, "She will yield, there's no way she can hold this position."

Short also questioned why Democrats feel the need to include additional witnesses in the first place, given the swift and decisive nature of the impeachment itself.

"If her case is so airtight that she said, that she had to ram it through and it's undeniable, why does she need more witnesses to make her case?" he asked.

Ultimately, Short said he thinks the impeachment is "a political exercise to placate the radical left of their base," and that it is "going nowhere."

JEFF FLAKE CLAIMS SENATE REPUBLICANS, NOT JUST TRUMP, ARE ON TRIAL

Later in the program, Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., addressed the delay in the delivery of the articles of impeachment, claiming that while she does not know what the House's time frame will be, the present timeline is nothing out of the ordinary.

She pointed out that President Bill Clinton was impeached on Dec. 19, and the House did not appoint their managers until Jan. 6, after Congress returned from the holiday break. She does not believe the current Senate would move any faster, regardless of how quickly the House moved.

"Did you really think the United States Senate was going to start this trial before January 6?" she asked.

Host Chris Wallace pointed out that Pelosi is hoping to use her delay to give Shumer leverage in his discussions with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who has accused Pelosi of having "cold feet."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Dingell responded to that by criticizing McConnell, who has stated that he is "not an impartial juror."

"I don't call that a fair and impartial hearing," she said.

Original Article

FISA court judge demands info about FBI lawyer linked to Carter Page warrant

closeFISA court orders FBI to fix wiretaps amid IG reportVideo

FISA court orders FBI to fix wiretaps amid IG report

Fox News contributor Sara Carter, American Conservative Union chair Matt Schlapp, and conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza share their reaction.

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s presiding judge has sent another directive to the Justice Department, ordering officials to identify previous surveillance requests from an FBI lawyer linked to the 2016 warrant from former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page.

In an order unsealed Friday, Judge Rosemary Collyer asked the Justice Department to identify steps to ensure the accuracy of those filings and whether the unnamed DOJ lawyer was ever disciplined.

DOJ inspector general Michael Horowitz recently identified in a scathing public report numerous mistakes and omissions in the warrant used against Page that launched the FBI investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

FISA COURT SLAMS FBI OVER SURVEILLANCE APPLICATIONS, IN RARE PUBLIC ORDER

Carter Page: There's been no real action to address FISA abuseVideo

The letter unsealed Friday was dated Dec. 5, which was four days before Horowitz’s report was released.

Collyer had earlier this week ordered DOJ to identify by January 10 what steps it was taking to correct problems with the FISA warrant process. The FBI had promised to work with DOJ to comply.

Sources have said the unidentified FBI lawyer in question has since resigned his post, and the Horowitz report said he faces possible criminal prosecution.

In a rare public order earlier this week, Collyer strongly criticized the FBI over its surveillance-application process, giving the bureau until Jan. 10 to come up with solutions, in the wake of findings from Horowitz.

Horowitz said he did not find significant evidence that FBI agents were involved in a political conspiracy to undermine Trump's candidacy in 2016. However, the report did find numerous errors and inaccuracies used by FBI agents to obtain permission to monitor Page's phone calls and emails.

While Collyer's order earlier this week did not specify exactly what reforms the FBI needed to implement to its policies for obtaining permission to wiretap people under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, the order did say that the FISA court will weigh in on whether the reforms are deemed sufficient.

FISA REPORT DROPS: 7 TAKEAWAYS FROM DOJ WATCHDOG'S RUSSIA PROBE REVIEW

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court deals with some of the most sensitive matters of national security: terror threats and espionage. Its work, for the most part, cannot be examined by the American public, by order of Congress and the president. Its work is mostly secret, and its structure largely one-sided.

It was also revealed Friday that Collyer, who is also a senior judge on the DC federal court, will resign her position as presiding judge on the FISA court at year’s end. Her current term was set to expire in March 2020.

Chief Justice John Roberts will replace Collyer with James Boasberg, a colleague of Collyer on the FISA court and DC federal bench. He was named to the FISA court in 2014 and is one of 11 judges on the rotating FISA court.

Sources say Collyer, 74, is leaving for unspecified personal reasons.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Original Article

Biden says ‘yes’ when asked about sacrificing blue-collar jobs for clean energy

closeSwamp Watch: Did Joe Biden use his influence to get his son a job in Ukraine?Video

Swamp Watch: Did Joe Biden use his influence to get his son a job in Ukraine?

Breaking down the links between Joe Biden, Ukraine and Hunter Biden working for Burisma

Former Vice Preisdent Joe Biden made clear at Thursday night’s Democratic presidential primary debate that he’d sacrifice economic growth due to a boom in oil and natural gas production and potentially risk displacing hundreds of thousands of blue-collar workers in order to combat climate change.

Moderator Tim Alberta asked: "Three consecutive American presidents have enjoyed stints of explosive economic growth due to a boom in oil and natural gas production. As president, would you be willing to sacrifice some of that growth, even knowing potentially that it could displace thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of blue-collar workers in the interest of transitioning to that greener economy?”

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“The answer is yes,” the former vice president said.

But Biden — the front-runner in national polling in the Democratic nomination race — emphasized that “the opportunity for those workers to transition to high-paying jobs … is real.”

“We’re the only country in the world that’s taken great, great crises and turned them into enormous opportunities,” Biden added.

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The former vice president provided an example of how in moving to a green energy economy, new jobs would replace lost jobs.

“We shouldn’t build another new highway in America that doesn’t have charging stations on it. We have an opportunity to put 550,000 charging stations so that we own the electrical vehicle market, creating millions of jobs for people installing them, as well making sure that we own electric vehicle market,” Biden explained.

But he insisted that “we have to make sure we explain it to those people who are displaced that their skills are going to be needed for the new opportunities."

The pro-Republican America Rising PAC quickly picked up on Biden’s answer, comparing it to a line Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton made during the 2016 debates with then GOP nominee Donald Trump.

“The Biden line sounds familiar, doesn't it?,” wrote America Rising Press Secretary Joe Gierut.

He then highlighted Clinton’s line from 2016 when she said “we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

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Biden — along with every other Democratic presidential contender — is calling for transforming the nation’s economy off fossil fuels and toward clean energy in order to dramatically lower carbon emissions. Their stances stand in sharp contrast with President Trump, a climate change skeptic who once called it a “hoax.” Trump emphasized earlier this year that America’s wealth is built on energy and that “I’m not going to lose it on dreams, on windmills.”

Original Article

Marianne Williamson falls for fake news story about Trump pardoning Charles Manson

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Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson got slammed on social media after she apparently fell for a fake news story Sunday night that claimed President Trump pardoned Charles Manson, the murderous cult leader who died in 2017.

"There is something deeply sinister about Trump pardoning Charles Manson, even posthumously," she wrote to her 2.8 million Twitter followers. "Dog whistles of the very worst possible kind…"

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The self-help author, who's running a longshot candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, later deleted the tweet and admitted the information was erroneous in a follow-up tweet. “Glad To have been wrong," Williamson wrote in a tweet that she also subsequently deleted.

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Marianne Williamson appeared to have fallen for a satirical news story Sunday night, tweeting there was "something deeply sinister" about President Trump pardoning murderer Charles Manson.

Marianne Williamson appeared to have fallen for a satirical news story Sunday night, tweeting there was "something deeply sinister" about President Trump pardoning murderer Charles Manson.

According to fact-checking website Snopes.com, the story about Trump and Manson is satirical and stems from a phony article published on Nov. 16 by MoronMajority.com. It was then picked up by political website the Daily Kos, which didn't label the article satire, and it seems Williamson picked up on it over the weekend.

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Manson died in November 2017 at 83 after suffering a heart attack and respiratory failure, triggered by colon cancer that had spread to other areas of his body. He had been serving a life sentence for orchestrating the 1969 killings of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and eight other people.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article