McConnell: The private sector needs to stop acting like a ‘woke parallel govt.’

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., addresses the media at a COVID vaccination site at Kroger Field in Lexington, Ky., Monday, April 5, 2021. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., addresses the media at a COVID vaccination site at Kroger Field in Lexington, Ky., Monday, April 5, 2021. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:48 PM PT – Monday, April 5, 2021

Major League Baseball’s decision to move the All-Star Game out of Georgia will reportedly cause the tourism industry to lose out on $100 million.

The Cobb County Travel and Tourism Bureau said the rescheduled game will negatively impact both the county and state, further slowing economic recovery efforts in the region.

This comes as the league decided to move the All-Star Game out of Atlanta in response to the state’s passage of a new voting law, which imposes identification requirements for voters. Critics have said the legislation will suppress minority voters while proponents of the law argue the bill will promote election integrity.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) took aim at corporate America for bending to the will of leftist ideals. In a statement Monday, he warned there would be “serious consequences” if the private sector doesn’t stop acting like a “woke parallel government.”

His comments came after the MLB made the decision to move the game based over the states new voter laws. Several other companies have also caved to the left by issuing negatives about election integrity laws nationwide.

McConnell noted, Americans don’t want big businesses to “amplify disinformation” or “react to every manufactured controversy.”

Meanwhile, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) suggested the MLB commissioner is being a hypocrite for moving the All-Star Game out of Georgia and keeping his membership with Georgia’s most prestigious golf club. He sent a letter to Commissioner Rob Manfred on Monday, asking if he would terminate his membership with Augusta National. This is an exclusive members-only club and annual host of The Masters.

Rubio and other Republicans alike are calling it a political stunt that “reeks of hypocrisy.”

MORE NEWS: Biden goes back on promise to shield families making under $400K/year from tax hike in infrastructure plan

Original Article Oann

Chris Christie: Biden is lying to the American people

File - New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie gestures as he speaks during a news conference, Jan. 9, 2014, at the Statehouse in Trenton. (Mel Evans/AP Photo)

File – Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) gestures as he speaks during a news conference at the Statehouse in Trenton. (Mel Evans/AP Photo)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:38 AM PT – Monday, April 5, 2021

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has accused Joe Biden of lying to the American people.

In an interview Sunday, the Republican said Biden was lying about the new election bill in Georgia. The legislation aims to ensure elections are protected from voter fraud.

Christie also commented on the MLB’s decision to move this season’s All-Star Game out of the state. He called the move a symptom of what’s happening in our country right now.

“Joe Biden has broken his own rule, 84 days, and now he’s lying to the American people,” stated the Republican. “He’s lying about this bill…he’s lying to the American people about it to cause this raging fire he said he was going to put out…I’m very disappointed.”

Christie went on to say Biden is lying to cause racial divisions in this country and doing exactly what he accused President Trump of doing.

MORE NEWS: Buttigieg: AOC infrastructure plan ‘bolder’ than Biden’s

Original Article

Ukraine-NATO to hold joint drills amid ongoing war with Russia

Ukrainian servicemen walk along a snow covered trench guarding their position at the frontline near Vodiane, about 750 kilometers (468 miles) south-east of Kyiv, eastern Ukraine, Saturday, March 5, 2021. The country designated 14,000 doses of its first vaccine shipment for the military, especially those fighting Russia-backed separatists in the east. Ukrainians are becoming increasingly opposed to vaccination: an opinion poll this month by the Kyiv International Institute of Sociology found 60% of the country's people don't want to get vaccinated, up from 40% a month earlier. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

Ukrainian servicemen walk along a snow covered trench guarding their position at the frontline near Vodiane, about 750 kilometers (468 miles) south-east of Kyiv, eastern Ukraine, Saturday, March 5, 2021. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:24 AM PT – Monday, April 5, 2021

Ukraine is preparing to hold joint military drills with NATO forces amid a renewed threat of escalation in the ongoing conflict with Russia.

“On this path, we have everyone’s full and permanent support,” stated Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. “Support by Ukraine’s international partners, by Europe and United States in particular.”

The leader of Ukraine said the EU and the Biden administration have provided security reassurances in case of a major Russian offensive in the Donbas region. However, experts pointed out the U.S. and EU have already failed to honor their previous guarantees under the Budapest Memorandum back in 2014.

“As for the situation in eastern Ukraine, in Donbass, complete ceasefire is a prerequisite to continue tough, though very important talks in the Minsk and Normandy formats,” stated President Zelenskiy. “I underline, once again, that our army is able to resist anyone’s attack and it strengthens our stance in settling the conflict by diplomatic means.”

Russia is reportedly moving its forces toward the Ukrainian border because the Kremlin believes the weak Biden administration will not risk a major war over Ukraine.

MORE NEWS: Australian T.V.: Biden is illiterate, incoherent & cognitively deficient

Original Article

GOP, Democrats Battle Over Infrastructure Plan

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GOP, Democrats Battle Over Infrastructure Plan GOP, Democrats Battle Over Infrastructure Plan Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., said the proposed rise in the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28% was "a big mistake for the administration." (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)

By Brian Freeman | Monday, 05 April 2021 10:04 AM

Republican congressmen are criticizing both the size of President Joe Biden’s proposed $2.25 trillion "infrastructure" plan and the fact that its funding is based on an increase in the corporate tax rate, while Democrats are touting it as a way to generate long-term job growth, The Hill reported.

"We think we can not only have a strong job rebound this year, but we can sustain it over many years,” National Economic Council Director Brian Deese told Fox News. “That’s the goal," adding that "let's also think to the longer term about where those investments that we can make that will really drive not just more job growth but better job growth, not just job growth in the short term but job growth in the long term by investing in our infrastructure, by investing in our research and development in a way that we haven't since the 1960s."

The Biden administration says its plan would provide billions of dollars to rebuild such structures as roads, bridges, and tunnels while also funding efforts to transition the United States away from the use of fossil fuels.

Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg explained on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that the legislation would be completely funded by an increase to the corporate tax rate and that it would also start cutting into the deficit after 15 years.

"Now is our chance to make infrastructure choices for the future that are going to serve us well in the 2030s and on into the middle of the century, when we will be judged for whether we met this moment here in the 2020s," Buttigieg said. He added that "across 15 years, it would raise all of the revenue needed for these once-in-a-lifetime investments. So by year 16, you'd actually see this package working to reduce the deficit."

But Republicans have slammed the tax hike included in the legislation, with Sen Roger Wicker, R-Miss, calling the rise in the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28% “a big mistake for the administration,” according to The Hill. Wicker added the proposal represented "a repeal of one of our signature issues in 2017," referring to the GOP tax reform bill that passed that year.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., stressed Republicans would be willing to back a smaller infrastructure package, telling Fox News that "I think there's an easy win here for the White House if they would take that win, which is make this an infrastructure package, which is about 30 percent [of what their proposal entails]… My advice to the White House has been take that bipartisan win, do this in a more traditional infrastructure way.”

It is unclear , however, if Democrats will attempt to gain Republican backing to help pass the bill, as there is disagreement in the party if the effort it worth it or if it is better to push through the legislation by usinig budget reconciliation.

Original Article

Trump Puts Off Presidential Library

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Trump Puts Off Presidential Library donald trump stands onstage under spotlight Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Mark Niquette and Jennifer Jacobs Monday, 05 April 2021 07:11 AM

Donald Trump is spending his first months as an ex-president trying to ensure that he’s remembered the way he wants — but he’s holding off on plans to establish a library that would enshrine his version of his presidency.

Planning for a library would suggest he’s done being president and that’s not something he’s ready to concede, say people familiar with his thinking. Trump has publicly dangled the possibility that he will seek the Republican nomination in 2024.

“Once he says, ‘I am going to be raising money for my library,’ he’s given up even the pretense of trying to run again,” said Anthony Clark, who has written about the politics and history of presidential libraries.

By delaying a library, Trump puts aside, at least for now, a chance to shape the story of his presidency — as Richard Nixon initially did at his museum by describing the Watergate scandal as a Democrat coup attempt, or as George W. Bush did with a theater that allows participants to vote on the options that he faced such as whether to invade Iraq but ends with a video of Bush explaining his decision.

All presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have pursued a presidential library as a way to archive and house their records for researchers as well as to burnish their legacies. Bill Clinton joked at Bush’s library opening in 2013 that it was the “latest, grandest example of the eternal struggle of former presidents to rewrite history.”

Before Barack Obama, presidents created nonprofit foundations to raise money from private donors to build libraries and museums that they then donated or leased to the federal government to staff and operate using taxpayer funds. The foundations pay for and create the exhibits, with the National Archives helping to develop the content.

Obama is having his private foundation build and administer his presidential center while allowing the National Archives to handle his records. Nixon initially did that as well with the library he opened in 1990 at his birthplace of Yorba Linda, California, before it was turned over to the government to run in 2007.

Clark said he doubts that Trump will ever have a presidential library because of how expensive and complicated they are to build, how difficult it is to secure a location, and because he didn’t start raising money and planning before leaving office as other presidents did.

Obama started his library foundation in 2014 for an expected $500 million presidential center in Chicago, his adopted hometown, but groundbreaking isn’t expected until this year because of delays from federal reviews and litigation.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center, which includes a library with his records, a museum, the Bush policy institute, and the offices of Bush’s foundation, opened on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas — former first lady Laura Bush’s alma mater — in 2013 after finalists for the site were announced in 2005.

The National Archives has already set up a Trump Presidential Library website with information about the former president and first lady Melania Trump, and holds the records of the Trump administration, which will start to become available in 2026 — though Trump can restrict access for 12 years.

While Trump may want the imprimatur of a library run by the federal government, he’d likely follow Obama’s and Nixon’s early model of having the National Archives handle records separately from a museum that he can fully control, said Timothy Naftali, who served as the first director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum after it became part of the federal system and created a new, nonpartisan Watergate gallery.

If Trump built a private library or tourist attraction for his supporters, that would allow him to depict his presidency the way he wants, Naftali said.

“His museum will have the same spirit as the private Nixon library’s museum,” said Naftali, now a presidential scholar and a clinical associate professor at New York University. “His tweets could be used as the banners for various galleries in the museum. It’ll be a center of Trumpism.”

With the delay, Trump is not only letting others write the history of his presidency, he’s giving up one opportunity to deploy his wildly successful fund-raising skills. Trump and his affiliated committees have raised more than $2.3 billion since he began his presidential campaign in 2015.

He told supporters before he left office in January that he wanted to raise $2 billion for a presidential library, according to The Washington Post, which would be the most ever. The most likely vehicle would be a nonprofit charity, the model used by modern presidents, because donations are tax deductible and the entity doesn’t have to pay tax on the money it raises, said Paul Seamus Ryan of the government-accountability group Common Cause.

He could legally accept money in unlimited amounts from sources including foreign countries, and disclosure of the donors’ identities isn’t required except by registered lobbyists who give $200 or more.

Yet such a charity requires that expenditures are used for the public good and not for private benefit of individuals.

Still, a former Nixon library official says that shouldn’t stop Trump from raising money for it.

“Donald Trump proved in 2020 that he had no problems raising money, and he now has four years, if he wants to, to just dangle that prospect of a return to power in front of potential donors,” said Paul Musgrave, a former special assistant to the director at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

Original Article

Corporations Gave Over $50M to Voting Restriction Backers

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Corporations Gave Over $50M to Voting Restriction Backers at&t store sign (Lynne Sladky/AP Photo)

BRIAN SLODYSKO Monday, 05 April 2021 06:39 AM

While executives from Coca-Cola and Delta Air Lines got the spotlight for speaking out against Georgia's new voting law as unduly restrictive last week, leaders of many of the nation's most prominent companies are backing such moves with campaign contributions.

State legislators across the country who have pushed for new voting restrictions have reaped more than $50 million in corporate donations in recent years, according to a new report by Public Citizen, a Washington-based government watchdog group.

Telecom giant AT&T was the most prolific, donating over $800,000 since 2015 to authors of proposed restrictions, cosponsors of such measures, or those who voted in favor of the bills, the report found. Other top donors during the same period include Comcast, Philip Morris, United Health, Walmart, Verizon, General Motors, and Pfizer.

The money may not have been given with voting laws in mind, but it nonetheless helped cement Republican control in statehouses where many of the measures are now moving forward.

Whether companies continue to give to these lawmakers will test how far risk-adverse corporate leaders are willing to go in their increasingly forceful criticism of the restrictive efforts, which voting rights groups have excoriated as an attack on democracy.

"It really is corporate America, as a whole, that is funding these politicians," said Mike Tanglis, one of the authors of the report. "It seems many are trying to hide under a rock and hope that this issue passes."

More than 120 companies detailed in the report previously said they would rethink their donations to members of Congress who objected to the certification of President Joe Biden's win following the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol.

The tension is most evident now in Georgia, where a far-reaching new voting law has drawn an intense national scrutiny, prompting the criticism from Delta and Coca-Cola. On Friday, MLB announced it would no longer host the 2021 All-Star Game in Atlanta.

Yet it's unclear whether this aggressive new posture will extend to corporate campaign donation practices. And early indicators show there is risk.

Georgia's Republican-controlled House voted to strip Delta of a tax break worth tens of millions of dollars annually for their criticism of the new law, though the action was rendered moot after the GOP Senate failed to take it up before the legislative session adjourned.

What is certain, though, is that withholding corporate donations to state-level candidates, like many companies did at the federal level, would have a far greater impact in statehouses.

"A contribution of $5,000 to a U.S. senator who is raising $30 million is a drop in a bucket. But in some of these state races, a few thousand dollars can buy a lot of ad time," said Tanglis.

Public Citizen analyzed about 245 voting restriction bills proposed before March 1. They culled a list of sponsors and cosponsors, while also analyzing vote roll calls. Then they cross-referenced the data with state-level donation records dating back to 2015, which included money from company-sponsored political action committees, as well as direct contributions from corporate treasuries.

Among their findings:

—Companies donated at least $50 million to lawmakers who supported voting restrictions, including $22 million in the 2020 campaign cycle.

—At least 81 Fortune 100 companies have given a combined total of $7.7 million to supporters of the restrictions.

—Nearly half of all Fortune 500 companies donated a combined total of $12.8 million to supporters of the restrictions.

—About three-quarters of the companies that changed their donation policies after the U.S. Capitol attack have also given to lawmakers who supported voting rights restrictions.

—More than 60 companies have given at least $100,000 to lawmakers who supported the restrictions.

—Separately, industry groups and trade associations contributed an additional $36 million to the lawmakers, $16 million of which was given during the 2020 cycle.

In response, AT&T said "the right to vote is sacred" but declined to say whether the company would withhold donations to state lawmakers as they did for members of Congress who objected to Biden's win.

"We understand that election laws are complicated, not our company’s expertise and ultimately the responsibility of elected officials. But, as a company, we have a responsibility to engage," AT&T CEO John Stankey said in a statement.

Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in a statement, "We strongly oppose the passage of any legislation or the adoption of any measure that would make it harder" to vote. But he stopped short of pledging any specific action.

Comcast said in a statement that "efforts to limit or impede access to this vital constitutional right for any citizen are not consistent with our values." The company would not comment on whether it would evaluate its giving to lawmakers who support the measures.

Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris, said in a statement that "every eligible voter should be able to exercise their right to vote" and pledged to monitor lawmakers' "alignment with our political contribution guiding principles when making future contribution decisions."

Other companies listed in the report declined to comment, or did not respond to inquiries from The Associated Press.

Pressure has been particularly intense in Georgia, where Republican Gov. Brian Kemp recently signed a sweeping new law that bans people from handing out food or water to voters waiting in line and allows the Republican-controlled State Election Board to remove and replace county election officials, among many other provisions.

Two of the top corporate contribution recipients detailed in Public Citizen's report were among the sponsors of the measure.

Since 2015, Republican state Sen. Jeff Mullis has collected more than $869,000 in donation from corporate PACs. Among his top corporate donors were AT&T ($15,900) and United Health Group ($12,900), according to the report. Mullis is chairman of the Georgia Senate’s Rules Committee, which plays a key role in determining which bills make it to the floor for a vote.

Republican state Sen. Butch Miller, another sponsor of the bill, has received at least $729,000 in corporate donations since 2015. Among his top corporate givers are United Health Group ($15,700) and AT&T ($13,600), the report states.

Miller and Mullis did not respond to requests for comment.

Original Article

Buttigieg: AOC infrastructure plan ‘bolder’ than Biden’s

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA - MARCH 30: U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg attends an event titled “Transforming Rail in Virginia” at the Amtrak-VRE station in March 30, 2021 in Alexandria, Virginia. The Transforming Rail in Virginia program will cost about $3.7 billion and will double Amtrak service and double Virginia Railway Express (VRE) service along the I-95 corridor, as well as work toward the separation of freight and passenger lines. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:10 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg commented on New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s (D-N.Y.) push to make the infrastructure bill bigger. On Sunday, Buttigieg said AOC’s proposal was bolder than the already proposed $2 trillion plan.

He said this was part of the bargaining process as Republicans have asked for a smaller bill and progressives have asked for something larger. Recently, AOC urged Joe Biden to push for a $10 trillion bill, which she claimed to be “realistic.” However, Buttigieg argued the bill has more than enough funding to develop America’s infrastructure.

“There are obviously a lot of people on the other side of the aisle saying, ‘This is too big, too bold,” Buttigieg stated. “And then, some of our friends on our side of the aisle are saying: It should be even bolder.’ Again, that’s a natural part of this conversation and this process, but let me stress, this is the biggest investment in American job creation proposed or, if achieved, since World War II. This is a huge deal.”

Republicans criticized the infrastructure bill for allocating only five percent of its budget for traditional infrastructure maintenance.

MORE NEWS: Biden Fails To Mention Jesus In ‘Easter Address,’ Speaks Of COVID

Original Article

Republicans: Government Overreach and Privacy Concerns Will Doom Vaccine Passports

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Republicans: Government Overreach and Privacy Concerns Will Doom Vaccine Passports a cell phone with a code for the passport in front of an american flag (Sipa via AP)

By Jim Thomas | Sunday, 04 April 2021 10:02 PM

Republicans are posturing against vaccine passports ahead of the 2022 midterms because of they believe their view is line with much of the public on the subject.

As part of the general strategy to take back the majority in the House of Representatives and recapture the majority in the Senate, Republicans believe that vaccine passports should not be mandated because they are violative of personal privacy rights and would be a product of government overreach by exerting too much public control over private lives, reports The Hill.

Outspoken Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) stated it was “unacceptable” for local governments or businesses to require proof of vaccination for people to “participate in normal society,” added The Hill. DeSantis also signed an executive order recently which banned any future vaccine certificate requirements in Florida. He also suggested that the Republican controlled state legislature draft a bill turning his executive order into state law.

“It’s a political winner,” Ford O’Connell, a Florida-based Republican strategist, said. “They look at it as an all-out assault on personal freedoms and the Constitution, but also, it’s about protecting the average, ordinary Floridian who wants to live their regular day-to-day lives,” according to the Hill.

GOP strategists are positioning campaigns on the proposition that vaccine passports will help them play on voters’ fears of government overreach and privacy violations. While there may be an increased desire to receive the COVID vaccination,there is still a strong reluctance to be required to carry a vaccine passport.

A Gallup poll released on Tuesday concluded that roughly 75% of those responding are willing to be vaccinated.

The White House said it expected the private sector to take the lead on verification of vaccine passports and would not issue a federal mandate requiring everyone to obtain a single vaccination credential, according to Reuters. However, the Biden administration was reviewing the issue and would make recommendations, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said on Monday, but she added, “We believe it will be driven by the private sector.”

“It’s not a COVID discussion for Republicans. It is a freedom discussion. It’s a role-of-government discussion,” one GOP strategist said. “Would I prefer to be having a COVID discussion next year? No. But we want to be having that freedom discussion.”

If strategists are correct, this position taken by Republicans on vaccine passports may put them over-the-top in their quest to recover the majority in both houses of Congress as they only need five seats in the House and only one in the Senate to seize the majority.

Not all in the GOP are confident that opposition to vaccine passports will be a winning issue.

“It’s red meat for the base, sure, but this doesn’t help us win back the middle,” one veteran GOP campaign aide reported to the Hill. “It’s just more of the culture wars … and it also means talking about COVID instead of the damage being done by Democrats.”

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, said on a “Utah Politics” podcast Friday that it should be an optional business issue and not a government one.

“I think vaccines are good, and I think once people have gotten a vaccine that they have the ability to present credentials to private property owners who might decide they want their customers to have been vaccinated,” Lee said.

“You don’t ever want to get us in a position where our own government is playing any part in the way human beings move within our own borders,” he added. “That’s something the American people, regardless of their political leanings, don’t want.”

Since Trump has yet to weigh in about vaccine passports, some Republicans deferred their agreement until Trump addresses the topic, reports the Hill.

GOP Senator blasts infrastructure bill for removing 2017 tax cuts

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) is seen in the Senate Reception room as the Senate takes a short recess on the fifth day of the Senate Impeachment trials for former President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate will hear closing arguments and possibly vote on whether to convict former President Donald Trump for inciting the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6. (Photo by Greg Nash - Pool/Getty Images)

Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). (Photo by Greg Nash – Pool/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 5:05 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Mississippi Senator Roger Wicker (R) suggested Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill was not meant to pass with bipartisan support. While speaking with NBC, Wicker said the removal of President Trump’s signature 2017 tax cuts was enough to lose all Republican support.

Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS) asks a question during an oversight hearing to examine the Federal Communications Commission on June 24, 2020 in Washington,DC. - The hearing was held by the Senate Committee for Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (Photo by Jonathan Newton / POOL / AFP) (Photo by JONATHAN NEWTON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Senator Roger Wicker. (Photo by JONATHAN NEWTON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

The senator said raising taxes will make it more difficult for states to restore their economies amid the pandemic. He added, Biden’s tax increase will not only affect corporations, but small businesses too.

“When you talk about big businesses and you say we should raise the tax rate from 21 percent corporate rate to 28 percent,” Wicker said. “Let me just tell you, that’s going to cut job creation in the United States.”

Wicker said he is willing to work with Democrats to produce a more bi-partisan plan and even named Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg as a potential colleague.

MORE NEWS: Miss. Gov. Reeves: Biden’s Spending Plan Is A Political Statement

Original Article

Georgia GOP Legislators to Coca-Cola: We Want You Out

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Georgia GOP Legislators to Coca-Cola: We Want You Out Georgia GOP Legislators to Coca-Cola: We Want You Out Cans of Coca Cola are displayed on July 25, 2018 in San Rafael, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty)

By Jim Thomas | Sunday, 04 April 2021 05:24 PM

Certain Republican Georgia lawmakers want Coca Cola products removed from their offices after the corporation spoke out against the state's new election law, reports the Hill.

In a letter to Kevin Perry, president of the Georgia Beverage Association, eight members of the Georgia House of Representatives —Victor Anderson, Clint Crowe, Matt Barton, Jason Ridley, Lauren McDonald III, Stan Gunter, Dewayne Hill and Marcus Wiedower —complained about Coca-Cola.

“Given Coke’s choice to cave to the pressure of an out of control cancel culture, we respectfully request all Coca-Cola Company products be removed from our office suite immediately,” they stated. “Should Coke choose to read the bill, share its true intentions and accept their role in the dissemination of mistruths, we would welcome a conversation to rebuild a working relationship.”

Coca-Cola said in a statement obtained by Newsweek that it had been working with the Metro Atlanta Chamber in "expressing our concerns and advocating for positive change in voting legislation. We, along with our business coalition partners, sought improvements that would enhance accessibility, maximize voter participation, maintain election integrity and serve all Georgians."

The company stated it would continue to advocate for its position on voting issues in Georgia.

"We will continue to identify opportunities for engagement and strive for improvements aimed at promoting and protecting the right to vote in our home state and elsewhere," the company said.

Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey publicly attacked Georgia Republican Gov. Brian Kemp for recently signing into law voting legislation Quincey declared as “unacceptable” and “a step backwards.”

The legislation expands early voting opportunities, weekend early voting and extends deadlines for absentee ballot requests. It also creates a state-wide voter ID absentee voting requirement and restricts ballot drop box usage.

Quincey said the new law moves Georgia backwards.

“Let me be crystal clear and unequivocal, this legislation is unacceptable, it is a step backward and it does not promote principles we have stood for in Georgia, around broad access to voting, around voter convenience, about ensuring election integrity, and this is frankly just a step backwards,” Quincey said.

One provision of the new law seems to be of particular interest to the Georgia Beverage Association: the prohibition on handing out either soft drinks or food voters waiting in a line at the polling station to vote, reports the Hill.

Original Article

Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US

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Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US US President Joe Biden speaks about the March jobs report in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on April 2, 2021. (Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty)

By Brian Freeman | Sunday, 04 April 2021 04:39 PM

President Joe Biden’s infrastructure proposal is meant to collectivize the nation, political strategist Dick Morris said Sunday in a harsh criticism of the bill.

Speaking on “The Cats Roundtable” radio show hosted by John Catsimatidis on WABC 770 AM, Morris, a former adviser to President Bill Clinton, said Biden’s infrastructure package is "designed to collectivize the United States, to regiment us, to unionize us, and to make us controllable and tractable as an economy.”

Stressing that “the metaphor that comes to mind is when Stalin insisted that all the farmers go to collective farms,” Morris cautioned that the main feature of the infrastructure legislation is that “you cannot get those funds unless you unionize. Davis-Bacon will control all of that spending. You have to have a union for your company to qualify. That’s going to force the entire construction industry and huge numbers of other industries into unionization.”

He also emphasized that Biden intends to make the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act part of the legislation bill, which he said would “be the greatest disaster we’ve ever had.”

Morris warned that the general public does not yet know about the PRO Act, but said that the end result would be that “nobody can work for themselves. Everybody has to be on a corporate payroll. If you are a consultant or a contractor or a freelancer, you have to close up shop and become an employee of your client or the people you contract with.”

He said that this means that some “30 to 40 million people who make their living that way are going to have to be now on payroll,” stressing that such a law is already in effect in California and has “totally deformed the economy” of that state.

Morris said that the overall goal of Biden’s strategy on this legislative package is “to organize our economy for more efficient government control. It sounds like in Germany where everybody basically works for a few large companies and there are only one or two large unions that represent everybody.”

Original Article

Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US

getfile.aspxguid04C90CB6 F174 4E37 B090 5A82F4AD243E 1

Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US Dick Morris Slams Infrastructure Bill as Ploy to Collectivize US US President Joe Biden speaks about the March jobs report in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on April 2, 2021. (Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty)

By Brian Freeman | Sunday, 04 April 2021 04:39 PM

President Joe Biden’s infrastructure proposal is meant to collectivize the nation, political strategist Dick Morris said Sunday in a harsh criticism of the bill.

Speaking on “The Cats Roundtable” radio show hosted by John Catsimatidis on WABC 770 AM, Morris, a former adviser to President Bill Clinton, said Biden’s infrastructure package is "designed to collectivize the United States, to regiment us, to unionize us, and to make us controllable and tractable as an economy.”

Stressing that “the metaphor that comes to mind is when Stalin insisted that all the farmers go to collective farms,” Morris cautioned that the main feature of the infrastructure legislation is that “you cannot get those funds unless you unionize. Davis-Bacon will control all of that spending. You have to have a union for your company to qualify. That’s going to force the entire construction industry and huge numbers of other industries into unionization.”

He also emphasized that Biden intends to make the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act part of the legislation bill, which he said would “be the greatest disaster we’ve ever had.”

Morris warned that the general public does not yet know about the PRO Act, but said that the end result would be that “nobody can work for themselves. Everybody has to be on a corporate payroll. If you are a consultant or a contractor or a freelancer, you have to close up shop and become an employee of your client or the people you contract with.”

He said that this means that some “30 to 40 million people who make their living that way are going to have to be now on payroll,” stressing that such a law is already in effect in California and has “totally deformed the economy” of that state.

Morris said that the overall goal of Biden’s strategy on this legislative package is “to organize our economy for more efficient government control. It sounds like in Germany where everybody basically works for a few large companies and there are only one or two large unions that represent everybody.”

Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure

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Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) asks questions during a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs & Senate Rules and Administration joint hearing to discuss the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Greg Nash-Pool/Getty)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 03:36 PM

The Biden administration is making a "big mistake" in loading up a $2.25 trillion infrastructure package with things that do not pertain to roads, bridges, airports, or technology, says Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., who rebuked the legislation as a "purely partisan exercise."

"I think there's an easy win here for the White House if they would take that win, which is make this an infrastructure package, which is about 30% – even if you stretch the definition of infrastructure some – it's about 30% of the $2.25 trillion we are talking about spending," Blunt said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday."

Blunt noted about 30% of the proposal would be roughly $615 billion for roads, bridges, airports, transportation, services, and even things Democrats could loosely call infrastructure.

Instead, Blunt lamented, Democrats are pushing a massive spending package that includes a lot more non-infrastructure spending much like they did with the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, the American Rescue Plan.

Democrats are "trying to take 70 percent of this bill and call it infrastructure in a new way than we've ever talked about infrastructure before," Blunt said. "That means you're looking at another partisan package just like we had with COVID."

Democrats are clever about sneaking spending measures under the umbrellas of popular spending bills like COVID-19.

"Obviously, Democrats have figured out that infrastructure is something we need and something that's popular," Blunt said, pointing to public-private partnerships in paying for infrastructure programs and perhaps user-fee related taxes like gas tax or road fares.

"Whatever it would be, it would be a true bipartisan discussion as opposed to asking every Republican in the Senate who was there in 2017 to change their mind on a tax package that frankly, that had a lot to do with 3.5% unemployment rate we had a year ago when COVID started," Blunt said. "I think people have always accepted the user-tax concept of the transportation system."

As for the Democrats seeking to tax corporations at a 28% rate instead of the Trump tax reform rate of 21%, Blunt suggested that the tax cut paid for itself with economic growth, corporate repatriation, and greater American growth domestic product.

Taking the U.S. back to 28% would make it the second-highest tax rate in the world, he said.

"Other countries saw the success we were having and many reduced their corporate tax rate to try to keep their jobs at home," he concluded.

Original Article

Chris Christie: Biden Is a ‘Liar and a Hypocrite’ for Election Law Rhetoric

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Chris Christie: Biden Is a 'Liar and a Hypocrite' for Election Law Rhetoric chris christie and rudy giuliani walk through a door Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (L) and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani arrive at a news conference in the Briefing Room of the White House on Sept. 27, 2020 i(Joshua Roberts/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:30 PM

President Joe Biden is a hypocrite and a liar, according to Chris Christie, by pouring gasoline on raging election integrity and racial injustice fires for political expediency.

"Here's what Joe Biden's got to live with when he wakes up this morning on Easter morning: He is doing exactly what he sat around in the campaign and the transition and accused Donald Trump of doing; he is lying to cause racial divisions in this country," Christie told ABC's "This Week."

"That's what he accused Donald Trump of doing, and he's a liar and a hypocrite this morning."

Christie, the former GOP governor of New Jersey, had a firm back-and-forth with former Democrat Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on whether or not Biden is lying in his rebuke of Georgia's election reforms, which were codified into law after Democrats used the guise of COVID-19 to make massive 2020 election changes without passing them through the state legislature.

Biden was lying because the Georgia election reforms "expands early voting in Georgia" when "the president said it ended it," according to Christie.

"Let's talk about what the Georgia law is really about because we haven't had much of that," Christie said. "Drop boxes now become a permanent part of the Georgia landscape. They were not prior to COVID. They are now.

"Minimum of 17 days of early voting, including two Saturdays and two optional Sundays. You're going to have all voters being able to have multiple ways to prove who they are, driver's license, last four numbers of your Social Security number, even a utility bill or a free ID provided by the state of Georgia, and voting is going to be until – from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. as it is right now in Georgia."

Christie noted other states do not have as expansive early voting as Georgia, so the Democrat narrative it is restrictive is a lie on Biden's part, he said.

"Well, Stacey Abrams, by the way, Stacey Abrams was in New Jersey, in my state, praising Phil Murphy this week for a voting law where New Jersey early voting is nine days – half, half of what Georgia is," Christie told ABC's George Stephanopoulos, a former communications director for ex-President Bill Clinton.

"Yet she's on TV in New Jersey – I saw it myself – saying that this is one of the greatest voting expansion bills we've ever seen, but this is Jim Crow? I'm sorry, George."

Christie said Biden has broken his inauguration vow for unity, seeking to divide Americans on constitutional election law changes duly passed by state legislators – while H.R. 1 seeks to do something on the Democrats' behalf in Congress.

"Politics need not be a raging fire that destroys everything in its path," Christie said. "Every disagreement doesn't have to be a cause for total war, and we must reject a culture in which facts themselves are manipulated or made up.

"And Joe Biden's broken his own rule, 84 days. And now, he's lying to the American people, George. He's lying about this bill. He's lying to the American people about it to cause the raging fire he said he was going to put out. I'm very disappointed."

Original Article

AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas ‘Billions of Dollars’

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AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas 'Billions of Dollars' ken paxton stands at a mic with the court in the background Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks outside of the US Supreme Court in 2019.(Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:22 PM

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Sunday President Joe Biden’s open border policies are costing the state “billions of dollars.”

In an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” Paxton said the migrant surge is “a humanitarian disaster and the border towns are suffering more than any others.”

“We have the burdens in our state, we will have to educate them and take care of their health care, we have to figure out their family situation and deal with law enforcement issues,” he said. “It costs the state of Texas billions of dollars.”

“Every time the administration like Obama administration, the Biden administration, opens up the border, it increases our cost,” he added.“We also have the social cost, the crime, increased crime. I wish President [Joe] Biden would talk to the families that have been affected by the crime who have lost loved ones because of immigration. I think it might affect him and give him a different perspective on the downside of the policies that are devastating some of the families in my state.”

Paxton asserted Biden doesn’t have the power to change immigration law.

“He announced for the first 100 days of his administration that you can come across the border and you would not be deported,” he said. “That's not his job to change the law and I think his policies, his announced policies, send the signal to the world, ‘Come across the border and you'll be welcome, you'll be taken care of.’

“I think it's clear that he wants that to happen because he knows from past experience under the Obama administration that if you do that, people will come and it totally worked.”

Paxton also echoed the criticism of Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, of HR1.

“Labeling this the ‘corrupt politicians act’ is absolutely true because it would eliminate voter ID, which we do in our state to verify that you are the right person voting,” he said.

“It would push mail-in ballots which are the highest incidents of voter fraud and allow for felons to votes and would allow for illegals and do everything possible to open up elections so they are not credible anymore,” he continued.

“I think it will ruin the democracy and make our election totally unreliable in every single state instead of just a few,” he said.

But he said it was just one of the measures he is concerned about coming from the Biden administration.

“We are extremely concerned about what this administration is doing even with things like the Keystone pipeline,” he said. “We think they are in a war against fossil fuel and there's no good stated purpose for shutting down the Keystone pipeline… we are losing jobs and we have to ship that through railcar which is not environmentally friendly like pipeline. I have not heard one good reason for shutting down the pipeline.”

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Stephen Moore: Biden Spending on ‘Outrageous Boondoggles’

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Stephen Moore: Biden Spending on 'Outrageous Boondoggles' stephen moore sits on the stage and speaks with a cpac sign behind him. Economist Stephen Moore speaks at CPAC 2020. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 12:02 PM

President Joe Biden's massive spending programs are beyond what the former President Barack Obama administration pushed, or even what Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., proposed, Trump economist Stephen Moore warned.

"You're going to see so many outrageous boondoggles where they are giving away all of this money to these [green] companies, a lot of them are going to go bankrupt," Sunday's "The Cats Roundtable" WABC 770 AM-N.Y. "I am very nervous about this.

"The American people have to rise up and say this is not the way we run our country. We pay our bills. We don't massively increase our debt. We don't put our financial system in jeopardy.

Among the spending packages were the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan that was called coronavirus relief, but only a fraction of it went to actual pandemic response, and a lot of the money was deferred over a long period of time, making its urgency a moot point, Republicans argued.

Moore told host John Catsimatidis the $2 trillion infrastructure plan is similarly misrepresented as infrastructure, and it is "bridge too far."

"We are in the midst of one of the largest federal power grabs in the history of the country," Moore lamented. "This week, President Biden announced this massive $2 trillion so-called infrastructure bill that's really the Green New Deal.

"They're doing another $2 trillion spending deal on top of that, which will be announced in the next couple of weeks, which will be more money for daycare and education and all these things. This is now $6 trillion of spending that has been recommended by Biden.

"I am very nervous about the impact that this will have on our financial system. It is an amazing amount of new power that we are giving to the people in Washington. It tramples on a lot of the states. And I think this is not going to be a stimulus for the economy."

Ultimately, all this spending will put the U.S. in the dangerous position of being "an incredible debtor to the rest of the world," because it is a "lie" that Biden can pay for these programs by merely taxing the top 1%, Moore said.

"People who voted for Biden tell me they don't understand what's going on in Washington," Moore continued. "They don't understand where the money is going to come from. The idea that we are going to pay for all of this just taxing the top 1% is a lie.

"I think everybody knows you're not going to get trillions and trillions of dollars out of the top 1%. They're going to have to come after the middle class."

But "a revolt is brewing," Moore said.

"America is waking up to the fact that Biden has moved to the left of Bernie Sanders," he said. "I don't know who he's listening to, but this idea that we can bring the country to the brink of bankruptcy to fight climate change and to massively increase the welfare state is very dangerous."

It will eventually wind up in voters' hands to "stop this train from going over the cliff," Moore conclude.

"I think people have started to shift their opinion," he said. "They thought that Biden would be a moderate, centrist Democrat. He's getting a lot of bad advice in the White House. Let's turn him around so we don't bankrupt our great country."

Original Article

Sen. Blunt Decries Infrastructure Bill’s Lopsided Focus on Electric Vehicles

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Sen. Blunt Decries Infrastructure Bill's Lopsided Focus on Electric Vehicles roy blunt gets off escalator and speaks into reporter's phones Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks with reporters in 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 11:27 AM

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., on Sunday railed at President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan’s lopsided focus on charging stations for electric vehicles over roads, bridges and airports.

In an interview on ABC News’ “This Week,” Blunt charged only about a third of the massive plan addresses roads.

“I’ve reached out to the White House a couple of times now and said, you've got an easy bipartisan win here if you'll keep this package nearly focused on infrastructure, and then the other 70 or so percent of the package that doesn't have very much too do with infrastructure, if you want to force that in a partisan way, you can still do that,” he said.

“Why would you pass up the opportunity here to focus on roads, bridges, what's happening underground as well as above the ground on infrastructure, broadband, all of which wouldn’t be 40% of this package? And that would be a stretch I think to get all of those things to 40%.”

“There's more in the package for charging stations for electric vehicles, $174 billion, than there is for roads, bridges and airports and ports,” he said, adding, “If you're going to spend all this money on electric vehicles, which I think is part of the future, we need to figure out how electric vehicles pay for using the system just like gas-powered vehicles have always paid for it with a gas tax.”

According to Blunt, most people think infrastructure is primarily roads, bridges, ports and airports, yet “that’s a very small part of what they're calling an infrastructure package that does so much more than infrastructure.”

“I understand the dynamic of taking a popular title and put it, wrapping it around a bill that it's a fairly small percentage of, but it's the difference of whether you have a bipartisan, easy win or a very partisan, broad-based $2.25 trillion package,” he said.

“Every Republican in the Senate who was there in 2017 voted for the 2017 tax bill. To ask them to turn around, and within less than four years, turn that around is a very unlikely thing to happen,” he asserted.

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Ohio’s JD Vance Brings Big Dollars to GOP’s Working-Class Party

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Ohio's JD Vance Brings Big Dollars to GOP's Working-Class Party JD vance speaks on the phone J.D. Vance, venture capitalist and author of 'Hillbilly Elegy,' in 2017. ( Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 11:11 AM

J.D. Vance, a potential Republican Senate candidate from Ohio, is a rare breed in this hyper-political world: A working-class crusader backed big tech, ruling-class money, running as a conservative despite past praise of former President Barack Obama and disdain for former President Donald Trump.

None of it seems to fit in the normal lanes of politics, but the author of "Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis" is bringing money to the Republican Party's effort to rebrand as the working-class party, The Guardian reported.

Vance has yet to officially announce a run for the seat held by retiring Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, but he did already draw a $10 million donation from tech billion Peter Thiel – and an undisclosed amount from GOP mega donor Robert Mercer – to a super PAC in support of his candidacy. Vance has a Netflix adaptation of his book fueling his political cachet.

Vance, 36, a former U.S. Marine, Yale law school graduate, and venture capitalist, checks a lot of boxes for GOP donors, save for his past criticism of Trump and Obama praise, according to the report.

"I think that I'm going to vote third party because I can't stomach Trump," Vance told NPR when he released his book in 2016. "I think that he's noxious and is leading the white working class to a very dark place."

Then, in 2017, Vance wrote in The New York Times that he would "miss" Obama "and the example he set."

The former chairman of the Ohio Democratic Party David Pepper is skeptical of GOP efforts to take the "working-class" mantle from the big-budget, big-tech-backed Democrats.

"They're not going to get there on the standard worker issues," Pepper told The Guardian. "There's no way."

But Trump did carve into that voter base in the past two presidential elections with his America First platform.

"The Republican party is not the party of the country clubs, it's the party of hardworking, blue-collar men and women," Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said in his February CPAC speech.

And Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., tweeted after the November election: "We are a working-class party now. That's the future."

Even a former Obama adviser sees the transformative shift in politics for the working class.

"The Democratic party envisions themselves as the party of working people, but it doesn't feel that way to a lot of working people, and the party needs to figure that out," David Axelrod said after the election.

Vance, despite the big money, might fill the lane for the GOP in the battleground state of Ohio.

"He's clearly trying to mimic this Trump genuflection that we're seeing from some of the other candidates, which is kind of embarrassing for JD Vance, because his brand was very different just a couple years ago," Pepper told The Guardian.

Vance, if he decides to run, will at least bring a $10-plus million war chest.

"That's a lot of money, that will help him a lot, but if the only reason he's in the game is because of coastal big tech, it kills the 'I'm-a-Trump-guy' narrative – but it also kills his narrative about representing the working man," Pepper concluded to The Guardian.

Original Article