Rep. Doug Collins says he is not interested in DNI role

FILE – In this May 21, 2019, file photo, Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, speaks during a hearing without former White House Counsel Don McGahn on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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UPDATED 1:26 PM PT — Friday, February 21, 2020

Currently, Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) said he is not interested in the Director of National Intellegance (DNI) job at this time.

While speaking Friday, the representative shot down any possibility of leaving Capitol Hill and said he would not accept the DNI role if offered. He stated despite President Trump floating his name Thursday for the role, he is focused on running for Senate.

The president also announced his current replacement for former DNI Joseph Maguire in a tweet.

The Republican congressman went on to say he’s sure the president will pick somebody appropriate for the job.

Collins has served Georgia’s 9th Congressional District since 2013 and is looking to break into the U.S. Senate against GOP incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.).

RELATED: Report: Record Number Of Republicans File To Run For House, Senate Seats

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McCarthy suggests Jordan, Collins and Ratcliffe represent Trump during Senate impeachment trial

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Rep. McCarthy calls FISA report fallout a 'modern day Watergate'

House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy reacts to the FISA court's rebuke of the FBI in the Russia investigation and the latest on impeachment on 'Sunday Morning Futures.'

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., suggested on Sunday that he would choose Republican Reps. Jim Jordan of Ohio, Doug Collins of Georgia and John Ratcliffe of Texas to represent President Trump in his looming Senate impeachment trial.

“These are individuals I would actually pull in at the White House,” McCarthy said during an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures.” “You want people that have been through this, understand it, been in the hearings even when they were in the basement.”

“The basement” is a reference to the Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility, where House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., held the initial closed-door testimonies in the impeachment inquiry into Trump.

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Jordan, Collins and Ratcliffe – all staunch Trump allies in the House – played vocal roles in the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees’ inquiries into the president. Jordan was temporarily assigned by McCarthy to the Intelligence Committee to defend Trump and lambaste Democrats, while Collins is the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee and spent hours in the House floor criticizing the impeachment vote.

Sen. Graham: Pelosi 'taking a wrecking ball' to the ConstitutionVideo

It is currently unclear when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., will send the articles of impeachment to the Senate.

The House voted last week to impeach Trump, who became only the third president in U.S. history to be formally charged with “high crimes and misdemeanors." Pelosi has declined to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate until Republicans provide details on witnesses and testimony.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. D-N.Y., have been at an impasse over the issue, leaving open the possibility of a protracted delay until the articles are delivered.

Marc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol HillVideo

McConnell has all but promised an easy acquittal of the president. McConnell appears to have united Republicans behind an approach that would begin the trial with presentations and arguments, lasting perhaps two weeks, before he tries drawing the proceedings to a close.

That has sparked a fight with Pelosi and Schumer, who are demanding trial witnesses who refused to appear during House committee hearings, including acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Maine Sen. Susan Collins announces reelection campaign ahead of expected Senate trial on Trump

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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said Wednesday she'll be seeking reelection, in an announcement ahead of the Senate's expected trial of President Trump.

Collins has maintained she's willing to have an open mind when considering articles of impeachment against the president. The center-leaning senator famously gave a last-minute speech in support of Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court last year ahead of the Senate's narrow vote to confirm the justice.

Although she hasn't publicly weighed in on whether or not she would vote for or against removing the president, Collins repeatedly has defended the whistleblower whose allegations of misconduct by Trump have been central to the investigation into the president's abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

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The last remaining New England Republican in Congress, Collins historically has presented herself as a moderate politician, bucking party-line stances on issues such as abortion and challenging Trump's policies, including building a wall on the southern border between the U.S. and Mexico and withdrawing troops from Syria.

In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is surrounded by reporters as she heads to vote at the Capitol in Washington. Collins officially launched her bid for a reelection Wednesday, Dec. 18, setting up an expensive and closely watched battle for the seat the moderate Republican from Maine has held for nearly 24 years. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is surrounded by reporters as she heads to vote at the Capitol in Washington. Collins officially launched her bid for a reelection Wednesday, Dec. 18, setting up an expensive and closely watched battle for the seat the moderate Republican from Maine has held for nearly 24 years. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Collins detractors from the left have slammed her for supporting Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court, despite a myriad of sexual misconduct allegations against him, as well as advocating for the GOP tax cut.

"The fundamental question I had to ask myself in making my decision was this: In today's polarized political environment, is there still a role for a centrist who believes in getting things done through compromise, collegiality, and bipartisanship?" Collins said in an email, according to reports by NPR. "I have concluded that the answer to this question is 'yes' and I will, therefore, seek the honor of continuing to serve as Maine's United States senator."

Four Democrats are vying for the party’s nomination to face the 67-year-old senator, include activist Betsy Sweet, attorney Bre Kidman, former Google executive Ross LaJeunesse and Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon, who is backed by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Collins has amassed $8.6 million for her reelection bid, the largest haul of any political candidate in Maine history.

The expensive race is projected to cost anywhere between $80 million to $100 million before the 2020 elections, making it the most expensive run the state has ever seen.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Doug Collins: Democrats’ rush to impeach Trump like ‘last-minute Christmas shopping’

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House Democrats’ rush to an impeachment vote against President Trump before the end of the week is like impulsive “last-minute Christmas shopping,” the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee said Tuesday during a marathon day of contentious hearings on Capitol Hill.

“When you’re [under] the tyranny of a clock and that calendar, nothing else matters,” Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., told the House Rules Committee. “It’s like what’s gonna happen here in the holidays is, you’re getting close to that day and you’re supposed to get that gift and nothing else matters, you just gotta go get it.

“At the last minute if you don’t have anything,” Collins continued, “you just go out and you buy the first thing you get.”

“At the last minute, if you don’t have anything, you just go out and you buy the first thing you get.”

— Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga.

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Collins made the remarks before the rules panel ultimately approved procedures for Wednesday's impeachment proceedings in a 9-4 party-line vote. The House Judiciary Committee last week voted to send two articles of impeachment to the House floor, alleging Trump obstructed Congress and abused the powers of his office. Articles related to other Democratic allegations, such as bribery, were notably absent.

“The clock was running out and they found a phone call they didn’t like, they didn’t like this administration, they didn’t like what the president did," Collins continued during his testimony. "They tried to make up claims that there was pressure in all these other things outlined in the report, but at the end of the day it’s simply last-minute Christmas shopping.
“They ran and found something and said ‘We can do it!’” he concluded.

The panel’s meeting Tuesday laid the procedural groundwork for the House debate on Wednesday, outlining the timetable and other factors for the historic and divisive moment in Washington. At the core of the inquiry is Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Democrats allege that Trump’s push for investigations into the 2016 election and former Vice President Joe Biden’s conduct in the country was part of an attempted quid pro quo in exchange for a White House meeting and the unlocking of military aid. Trump denies this.

Speaking after Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., introduced the Democrats’ case Tuesday, Collins also compared what’s happening in the Democrat-led House to the 1865 chidlren's novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland."

“What’s up is down and what’s down is up,” Collins said. “We’re more 'Alice in Wonderland' than we are House of Representatives.”

“What’s up is down and what’s down is up. We’re more 'Alice in Wonderland' than we are House of Representatives.”

— Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga.

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On Wednesday, House Democrats will convene to adopt the rules for the impeachment debate shortly after 9 a.m. ET, followed by six hours of debate evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats. Some members will be afforded only one minute to speak, and no amendments to the impeachment resolutions will be permitted.

The final vote sequence will likely begin well into the evening hours, with one vote held on each article of impeachment, Fox News was told. It will likely end with Trump becoming just the third U.S. president ever to be impeached — a history-making development that Trump has said reflects far worse on congressional Democrats than it does on him.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw and Gregg Re contributed to this report.

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