Asian Woman Stabbed to Death, But Hate Crime Not Suspected

Asian Woman Stabbed to Death, But Hate Crime Not Suspected Asian Woman Stabbed to Death, But Hate Crime Not Suspected People participate in a protest to demand an end to anti-Asian violence on April 04, 2021 in New York City. (Spencer Platt/Getty)

By Brian Freeman | Sunday, 04 April 2021 09:09 PM

An Asian woman was stabbed to death over the weekend in Riverside, Calif., but police do not suspect a hate crime, CNN reported on Sunday.

The woman, 64-year-old Ke Chieh Meng, was out walking her two dogs on Saturday when she was attacked. Police said officers arrested 23-year-old Darlene Stephanie Montoya after neighbors in the area of the stabbing reported "a transient woman walking through their yards and appearing suspicious."

Riverside Police spokesperson Officer Ryan Railsback said, "when our detectives interviewed the suspect, they didn't come across anything to suggest she attacked the victim due to her race."

Police said the murder appeared to be random.

“We’re going to try to research [the suspect’s] drug-abuse history and her mental-health history,” Railsback said, adding that cops are nonetheless “not closing the door on anything,” according to the New York Post.

Less than a week ago, Montoya was arrested by Riverside police after she attacked a woman near a shopping mall and booked her into jail for assault with a deadly weapon, CNN reported.

However, she was released shortly thereafter on a "notice to appear" citation because of Riverside’s coronavirus-inspired emergency bail schedule.

Railsback said the victim in that case was a white woman, according to the Post.

Just this past week, President Joe Biden announced a number of new actions to combat the nation's rise in anti-Asian violence, Axios reported, after a recent series of shootings in which at least six Asian women were killed.

Anti-Asian hate crimes reported to police in the nation's largest cities soared almost 150% last year, according to a study by the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University.

Cow Causes Slow Moooving Traffic in Atlanta

Cow Causes Slow Moooving Traffic in Atlanta Cow Causes Slow Moooving Traffic in Atlanta A cow grazes on land. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty)

By Brian Freeman | Sunday, 04 April 2021 06:24 PM

A cow fell out of a trailer and held up traffic for about an hour on an interstate near Atlanta over the weekend, according to a tweet from the Dunwoody Police Department.

The cow was running down the I-285 highway on Saturday morning before police officers used a rope provided by a civilian to secure the animal.

Three lanes of the highway were closed while the cow was loose, with traffic returning to normal only about an hour later, according to WSB-TV.

A man headed to work who got caught in the traffic jam told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that “traffic was moving a little. Cars were slowly getting by. Then all the sudden this cow comes running around the corner with a gentleman chasing him.”

The newspaper noted that although such an incident is unusual, metro Atlanta traffic was actually snarled by cows on the highway in three separate incidents within a short time span a few years ago.

In the first incident, occurring in 2018, a tractor-trailer overturned on I-75, with 10 cows killed as a result.

Just a month later, another tractor-trailer crashed near I-285, killing three cows. Dozens of others spilled out on to the interstate.

Another tractor-trailer overturned on the the same highway the following year, with 11 cows killed, according to the newspaper.

Air Force Staff Sergeant Creating Wreaths From Old Uniforms

Air Force Staff Sergeant Creating Wreaths From Old Uniforms vintage marine uniform (Dreamstime)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Friday, 25 December 2020 02:34 PM

An Air Force staff sergeant is repurposing old military uniforms into patriotic wreaths to allow owners to both remember family members' service while celebrating the holidays.

''I started the business because the Air Force was switching over to new uniforms, and I wanted to find a cool way to memorialize my old ones,'' Staff Sgt. Nicole Pompei, 29, of Texas, told People magazine. ''Thanks to some help from my crafty mother, we came up with this design.''

Pompei sells the uniforms through her company, Wreaths by Nicole, which was launched in July. She is on active duty with the Air Force, and also served with the Marine Corps.

Some of the wreaths, which come in various sizes and designs, reflect patriotic themes while others have a holiday theme. Pompei said it takes around four hours to make a wreath.

One of her more interesting wreaths was made for a customer who had sent her three uniforms from 1946.

"This was the second time I’ve received uniforms that were almost 80 years old,'' she said on her Facebook page. ''I almost didn’t have the heart to cut them. I’m happy I did. Now they have a blended memento that they can hold with them for a lifetime.''

Pompei said she never expected to make a business out of her hobby, but her Facebook inbox soon became full of requests.

''The most rewarding part is hearing all of the stories of my customers and their family members,'' she said. ''I feel so honored that I can memorialize and honor their service. I have such respect for anybody who has served in the military.''

Housing Boom Sparks Fears Over Lack of Land for New Homes

Housing Boom Sparks Fears Over Lack of Land for New Homes sign pointing to new homes for sale A sign is posted in front of new homes for sale at Hamilton Cottages on September 24, 2020, in Novato, Calif. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

By Jeffrey Rodack | Friday, 25 December 2020 02:20 PM

Builders are growing worried they are running out of land to meet the surging demand for new homes.

The Wall Street Journal reported record low interest rates and a new premium on space during the pandemic have generated the biggest housing boom in years.

And a shortage of previously owned homes on the market is leading to an increase in buyers wanting new construction.

Builders, with much of their land inventory still in the development process, face the prospect of a shortage of finished lots or land that can be built on, said Jody Kahn, senior vice president at John Burns Real Estate Consulting LLC.

And Phillippe Lord, chief operating officer at Scottsdale, Arizona-based builder Meritage Homes Corp. said: ''The competition for land is extremely high as the homebuying demand grows.''

New home sales soared 20.8% on a year-on-year basis. The government reported last week that single-family homebuilding, the largest share of the housing market, increased in November to the highest level since April 2007.

But persistent shortages of land, materials and skilled labor are increasing construction costs for builders.

Luke Pickerill, owner of MonteVista Homes in Bend, Oregon, said: ''In Central Oregon, I will literally be out of lots and I’ll have nothing to sell'' by next month. ''All of the inventory that we expected to be selling in quarter one and quarter two of next year, we’ve now sold through it already this year.''