Turkey begins requiring negative PCR test for travel

A woman wears a protective face mask while walking on Galata bridge in Istanbul, Turkey amid the outbreak of COVID-19. (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:05 PM PT – Saturday, December 26, 2020

Turkey has begun requiring proof of a negative COVID-19 test in order to board an incoming plane. Turkey’s health minister announced the new policy Friday, which bars those who fail to comply.

All passengers flying in from Britain, South Africa or Denmark will be required to quarantine in addition to providing a negative test result. This is a change from Turkey’s previous policy, which only required a test for those showing symptoms.

One traveler said her trip to Amsterdam was derailed since she couldn’t get a PCR test on such short notice.

“Yesterday at 20 past 8 p.m., I got an email from Eurostar that if I want to go to Amsterdam, I need a PCR test,” the traveler said. “But how can I get PCR test in the night or even in one day?”

These new international requirements are effecting travelers worldwide. Only more changes are expected to come as countries continue to issue new policies to combat the pandemic.

MORE NEWS: Congress Is Focused On COVID-19 Relief Bill, Gov’t Funding

Original Article

Air Force Staff Sergeant Creating Wreaths From Old Uniforms

Air Force Staff Sergeant Creating Wreaths From Old Uniforms vintage marine uniform (Dreamstime)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Friday, 25 December 2020 02:34 PM

An Air Force staff sergeant is repurposing old military uniforms into patriotic wreaths to allow owners to both remember family members' service while celebrating the holidays.

''I started the business because the Air Force was switching over to new uniforms, and I wanted to find a cool way to memorialize my old ones,'' Staff Sgt. Nicole Pompei, 29, of Texas, told People magazine. ''Thanks to some help from my crafty mother, we came up with this design.''

Pompei sells the uniforms through her company, Wreaths by Nicole, which was launched in July. She is on active duty with the Air Force, and also served with the Marine Corps.

Some of the wreaths, which come in various sizes and designs, reflect patriotic themes while others have a holiday theme. Pompei said it takes around four hours to make a wreath.

One of her more interesting wreaths was made for a customer who had sent her three uniforms from 1946.

"This was the second time I’ve received uniforms that were almost 80 years old,'' she said on her Facebook page. ''I almost didn’t have the heart to cut them. I’m happy I did. Now they have a blended memento that they can hold with them for a lifetime.''

Pompei said she never expected to make a business out of her hobby, but her Facebook inbox soon became full of requests.

''The most rewarding part is hearing all of the stories of my customers and their family members,'' she said. ''I feel so honored that I can memorialize and honor their service. I have such respect for anybody who has served in the military.''

Housing Boom Sparks Fears Over Lack of Land for New Homes

Housing Boom Sparks Fears Over Lack of Land for New Homes sign pointing to new homes for sale A sign is posted in front of new homes for sale at Hamilton Cottages on September 24, 2020, in Novato, Calif. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

By Jeffrey Rodack | Friday, 25 December 2020 02:20 PM

Builders are growing worried they are running out of land to meet the surging demand for new homes.

The Wall Street Journal reported record low interest rates and a new premium on space during the pandemic have generated the biggest housing boom in years.

And a shortage of previously owned homes on the market is leading to an increase in buyers wanting new construction.

Builders, with much of their land inventory still in the development process, face the prospect of a shortage of finished lots or land that can be built on, said Jody Kahn, senior vice president at John Burns Real Estate Consulting LLC.

And Phillippe Lord, chief operating officer at Scottsdale, Arizona-based builder Meritage Homes Corp. said: ''The competition for land is extremely high as the homebuying demand grows.''

New home sales soared 20.8% on a year-on-year basis. The government reported last week that single-family homebuilding, the largest share of the housing market, increased in November to the highest level since April 2007.

But persistent shortages of land, materials and skilled labor are increasing construction costs for builders.

Luke Pickerill, owner of MonteVista Homes in Bend, Oregon, said: ''In Central Oregon, I will literally be out of lots and I’ll have nothing to sell'' by next month. ''All of the inventory that we expected to be selling in quarter one and quarter two of next year, we’ve now sold through it already this year.''

Liberal Bias of Wikipedia Called Out in 5 Studies

Liberal Bias of Wikipedia Called Out in 5 Studies wikipedia sign (Jens Kalaene/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 29 November 2020 11:53 AM

Left-wing media bias has taken over once-neutral Wikipedia, just as co-founder Larry Sanger lamented earlier this year, according to five studies reviewing the content of the online encyclopedia.

The studies have concluded Wikipedia is even more left-biased than the Encyclopedia Britannica, left-wing indoctrination is pushed harder by leftist editors, liberal media is more pronounced in the mentions on that site, the reviews of politicians relies are left-wing sources, and conservative editors on the website are six times more likely to be sanctioned for their updates.

1. Harvard Study: Wikipedia More Left-Biased Than Britannica

While both are slanted toward liberal views, the study find Wikipedia is more biased toward Democrats.

“Using a matched sample of pairs of articles from Britannica and Wikipedia, we show that, overall, Wikipedia articles are more slanted towards Democrat than Britannica articles, as well as more biased,” the study’s abstract reads.

Notably, Wikipedia becomes less biased the more a post is edited and reviewed, and the study also found the most liberal-biased entries are ones least edited or reviewed.

2. Harvard Study: Indoctrination Pushed Harder Left and by Leftists

The same researchers above followed up their study with another one that found the most frequent editors are leftists and they are also far more biased partisans, according to their study.

3. Wikipediocracy: Top News Outlets Cited Are Mostly Left-Wing

Established leftist outlets The New York Times and BBC News are the most cited sources, around 200,000 stories. The Guardian, an equally left-wing outlet, is cited third at almost 100,000 citations.

Among the top 10 most-cited, only one was right-leaning.

4. Wikipediocracy/AllSides: U.S. Politicians Pages Rely on Left-Wing Sources

Using AllSides and Media Bias/Fact Check (MBFC) ratings, a Wikipediocracy user found stories on American politicians rely mostly on left-wing media. The ratio is almost 3- or 4-to-1 left wing vs. right wing. And even centrist sources are used to the same ratio vs. right wing ones, per the analysis.

5. The Critic: Right-Wing Editors 6 Times More Likely to Be Sanctioned

Those espousing right-wing views on topics like politics, abortion, gun control, race, and intelligence were six times more likely to be sanctions by the “Supreme Court” of the Wikipedia editors, especially those reviewing things about President Donald Trump.

Trump: Fox News ‘Virtually Unwatchable’

Trump: Fox News 'Virtually Unwatchable' Trump: Fox News 'Virtually Unwatchable'

Sunday, 29 November 2020 11:38 AM

President Donald Trump ramped up criticism of Fox News over the weekend, calling it "virtually unwatchable.”

In a tweet, Trump directed conservatives to tune to other outlets, including Newsmax.

“@Fox News daytime is virtually unwatchable, especially during the weekends,” he wrote Saturday. “Watch @OANN, @Newsmax or almost anything else. You won't have to suffer through endless interviews with Democrats, and even worse!"

Trump's latest tweet highlights a progressively rocky relationship between the president and his formerly favorite news outlet.

For several months Trump has tweeted criticisms of the conservative network, at times calling them "Fake News" and "anti-Trump."

"@FoxNews is no longer the same. We miss the great Roger Ailes. You have more anti-Trump people, by far, than ever before. Looking for a new outlet!," he tweeted in May.

According to Axios, Trump advisers think Fox News made a mistake with an early call of Joe Biden's win in Arizona. That enraged Trump, and gave him something tangible to use in his attacks on the network.

“He plans to wreck Fox. No doubt about it," Axios quoted one source saying.

Important: See Newsmax TV now carried in 70 million cable homes, on DirecTV Ch. 349, Dish Network Ch. 216, Xfinity Ch. 1115, Spectrum, U-verse Ch. 1220, FiOS Ch. 615, Optimum Ch. 102, Cox cable, Suddenlink Ch. 102, CenturyLink 1209, Mediacom Ch. 277, Frontier 615 or Find More Cable Systems – Click Here.

Original Article

Brett Favre: Sports Fans Don’t Want Political Messaging At Games

Brett Favre: Sports Fans Don't Want Political Messaging At Games brett favre wears a headset and speaks into a mic. Former NFL player Brett Favre speaks during Super Bowl LIV on Jan. 31, 2020 in Miami, Florida. (Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SiriusXM )

By Cathy Burke | Sunday, 29 November 2020 09:15 AM

Hall of Fame NFL quarterback Brett Favre says fans don’t want “political messaging mixed with their sports,” and that a drop in television viewers reflects that.

In an interview last week on Sinclair Broadcasting’s “America This Week,” the former Green Bay Packers field general said he doesn’t judge anyone who does or doesn’t kneel during the national anthem at football games.

“I’m glad I don’t have to deal with that,” he said of the controversy over the social justice gesture.

“I’m not saying who’s right or wrong,” he said, adding, “There’s a lot of things that need to be fixed in this world. We can all work together.”

But he defended his remarks in a video question to President Donald Trump during a virtual town hall held by “America This Week,” remarking there was a reason behind a drop in NFL viewership on TV.

”Fans clearly don’t want political messaging mixed with their sports, so how do leagues deal” with racism, Favre asked Trump — a remark that angered some watchers, host Eric Bolling noted.

“I don’t pay attention,” Favre replied to Bolling.

“Most people thought it was a good question,” he said. “All the haters can’t wait to get on their phones.”

Favre also said “all of us … the older generation” are worried about the direction the country is headed.

“It’s frightening what it’s going to be like in 20-30 years from now but I can’t imagine it being pleasant,” he said.

Favre spoke openly about his opioid addiction during his early years with the Packers following a shoulder separation he suffered in his first year with the team.

“I remember vividly getting hurt,” he said, adding he’d just turned 22. “I started eating pain pills.”

“With every injury I had after that, I made it seem like it was worse off than it really was,” he said, adding “That's really how it started. This went on for three, four years.”

“Like most people who it happens to young, before you know it, it's got a hold of you. And, of course, I thought I had it controlled,” he said.

“At my peak, I was taking 16 in one night…all 16 at one time… If I did that today, right now, it would probably kill me,” he said, lamenting that from 1992 to 1996, things were “a blur.”

“I was deceiving myself, I guess because I was playing well. I won three MVPs, how could I have a problem?” he recalled. But along with a drinking problem, he said he suffered two seizures and realized he had to stop.

“I knew something bad was gonna happen… I realized I was at the end of my rope,” he said. “Ultimately I flushed them down the toilet” and “I quit drinking a year later.”

Brett Favre: Sports Fans Don’t Want Political Messaging At Games

Brett Favre: Sports Fans Don't Want Political Messaging At Games brett favre wears a headset and speaks into a mic. Former NFL player Brett Favre speaks during Super Bowl LIV on Jan. 31, 2020 in Miami, Florida. (Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SiriusXM )

By Cathy Burke | Sunday, 29 November 2020 09:15 AM

Hall of Fame NFL quarterback Brett Favre says fans don’t want “political messaging mixed with their sports,” and that a drop in television viewers reflects that.

In an interview last week on Sinclair Broadcasting’s “America This Week,” the former Green Bay Packers field general said he doesn’t judge anyone who does or doesn’t kneel during the national anthem at football games.

“I’m glad I don’t have to deal with that,” he said of the controversy over the social justice gesture.

“I’m not saying who’s right or wrong,” he said, adding, “There’s a lot of things that need to be fixed in this world. We can all work together.”

But he defended his remarks in a video question to President Donald Trump during a virtual town hall held by “America This Week,” remarking there was a reason behind a drop in NFL viewership on TV.

”Fans clearly don’t want political messaging mixed with their sports, so how do leagues deal” with racism, Favre asked Trump — a remark that angered some watchers, host Eric Bolling noted.

“I don’t pay attention,” Favre replied to Bolling.

“Most people thought it was a good question,” he said. “All the haters can’t wait to get on their phones.”

Favre also said “all of us … the older generation” are worried about the direction the country is headed.

“It’s frightening what it’s going to be like in 20-30 years from now but I can’t imagine it being pleasant,” he said.

Favre spoke openly about his opioid addiction during his early years with the Packers following a shoulder separation he suffered in his first year with the team.

“I remember vividly getting hurt,” he said, adding he’d just turned 22. “I started eating pain pills.”

“With every injury I had after that, I made it seem like it was worse off than it really was,” he said, adding “That's really how it started. This went on for three, four years.”

“Like most people who it happens to young, before you know it, it's got a hold of you. And, of course, I thought I had it controlled,” he said.

“At my peak, I was taking 16 in one night…all 16 at one time… If I did that today, right now, it would probably kill me,” he said, lamenting that from 1992 to 1996, things were “a blur.”

“I was deceiving myself, I guess because I was playing well. I won three MVPs, how could I have a problem?” he recalled. But along with a drinking problem, he said he suffered two seizures and realized he had to stop.

“I knew something bad was gonna happen… I realized I was at the end of my rope,” he said. “Ultimately I flushed them down the toilet” and “I quit drinking a year later.”

Original Article

New Jersey Woman Accused of Sending Money to Terrorists

New Jersey Woman Accused of Sending Money to Terrorists New Jersey Woman Accused of Sending Money to Terrorists (Dreamstime.com)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Saturday, 28 November 2020 11:40 AM

A New Jersey woman has been arrested on charges that she was sending money to a foreign terrorist organization in Syria, according to the U.S. Attorney's office.

Authorities say Maria Bell, 53, of Hopatcong, is charged with allegedly sending money to a member of Hay'at Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), a Syrian terrorist organization that is fighting against the Assad regime, reports NJ.com.

The complaint charges her with one count of knowingly concealing the provision of material support or resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization. It also says that Bell, a former member of the U.S. Army and Army National Guard, used her expertise in specialized weapons training to "guidance concerning operational security issues, firearms purchases, and military knowledge.”

The complaint alleges Bell started communicating with one member of HTS in February 2017 and sent thousands of encrypted communications to that person, including asking if he or she was "ready to fight in front line with other fighters."

Bell allegedly sent at least 18 payments for a total of $3,150 to people in Turkey and Syria who support HTS, knowing the money would support acts of terrorism, according to federal officials.

The State Department added HTS to its database as a foreign terrorist organization in May 2018, according to the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Dean Sovolos, during Bell's first court appearance, described her as a danger to the community and a flight risk, saying that when she was arrested officers recovered 136 operable handguns and rifles, 15 canisters of ammunition, and a short-range rocket launcher inside her two-bedroom home.

Her lawyer said most of the weapons were antiques and she got them after the death of her husband, who had worked at an armory.

Bell faces up to 10 years in prison.

US COVID Case Rise Sets New High After Thanksgiving Break

US COVID Case Rise Sets New High After Thanksgiving Break US COVID Case Rise Sets New High After Thanksgiving Break (Dreamstime)

Bloomberg News Friday, 27 November 2020 09:24 PM

The U.S. added 196,050 new cases so far Friday, a record, as some states resumed daily updates following the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday.

The increase brings the total for the country to 13.1 million. Deaths increased by 1,406 to 264,823. The CDC said in a tweet that forecasts predict as many as 21,400 new deaths may be reported during the week ending Dec. 19, with up to 321,000 fatalities.

It also warned that cases and hospitalizations are rising.

Many Americans appear to have ignored warnings to minimize travel and keep family gatherings scaled back this Thanksgiving as a way to slow the coronavirus's spread. Now some epidemiologists are anticipating that the pandemic, already surging before the holiday, will actually intensify in coming days as a consequence.