Rep. Swalwell: Impeachment over Roger Stone intervention an option

FILE – In this Jan. 29, 2019 file photo, former campaign adviser for President Donald Trump, Roger Stone arrives at Federal Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:12 AM PT — Thursday, February 13, 2020

According to congressman Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.), impeachment is still not off the table after the Justice Department intervened on behalf of Republican operative Roger Stone.

In an interview Wednesday, the California lawmaker said he agreed with Stone’s sentence and he shouldn’t be treated differently than anyone else who went to trial.

Swalwell said he’s concerned about the ability of judges and prosecutors to work independently. He added, ultimately it will be up to the voters in November. However, impeachment over the Stone issue is still an option.

“We don’t wake up in the morning wanting to impeach him,” stated Swalwell. “…but we’re not going to let him just torch this democracy because he thinks that he’s been let off once and we’re not going to do something about it.”

Democrats have reportedly called for new investigations and oversight into President Trump, but they are ultimately struggling to figure out what to do next after their impeachment effort failed last week.

RELATED: President Trump On Stone Pardon: I Don’t Want To Talk About That Yet

Original Article

President Trump: Failed impeachment inquiry shows Democrats are ‘crooked’

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:55 AM PT — Thursday, February 13, 2020

According to President Trump, the main take-away from the impeachment process is that Democrat lawmakers are corrupt. While speaking to reporters at the White House Wednesday, he suggested top Democrats are guilty of wrong doing.

The president was reiterating his previous claim that the impeachment process should have never started. He pointed out that Democrats have spared no effort to attack his administration for no reason at all with help from the media.

When asked what he learned from the impeachment process, President Trump didn’t hesitate to say the main thing he gathered was simply that the Democrats are crooked.

“They got a lot of crooked things going…that they’re vicious…that the shouldn’t have brought impeachment,” he stated. “And my poll numbers are ten points higher because of fake news like NBC, which reports the news very inaccurately. ”

The president has continued his calls to investigate the origins of the Russia investigation as well as impeachment and said those responsible must be held accountable.

RELATED: Impeachment Will Cause Democrats To Lose House In 2020, according to pollster

Original Article

President Trump: Failed impeachment inquiry shows Democrats are ‘crooked’

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:55 AM PT — Thursday, February 13, 2020

According to President Trump, the main take-away from the impeachment process is that Democrat lawmakers are corrupt. While speaking to reporters at the White House Wednesday, he suggested top Democrats are guilty of wrong doing.

The president was reiterating his previous claim that the impeachment process should have never started. He pointed out that Democrats have spared no effort to attack his administration for no reason at all with help from the media.

When asked what he learned from the impeachment process, President Trump didn’t hesitate to say the main thing he gathered was simply that the Democrats are crooked.

“They got a lot of crooked things going…that they’re vicious…that the shouldn’t have brought impeachment,” he stated. “And my poll numbers are ten points higher because of fake news like NBC, which reports the news very inaccurately. ”

The president has continued his calls to investigate the origins of the Russia investigation as well as impeachment and said those responsible must be held accountable.

RELATED: Impeachment Will Cause Democrats To Lose House In 2020, according to pollster

Original Article

Pollster: Impeachment will cause Democrats to lose House in 2020

President Donald Trump holds up a newspaper with a headline that reads “Trump acquitted” during an event celebrating his impeachment acquittal, in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 8:39 AM PT — Monday, February 10, 2020

According to pollster John McLaughlin, the impeachment process in the House has backfired on Democrats. While speaking in an interview Sunday, he predicted the proceedings will cause Democrats to lose their House majority in 2020.

McLaughlin added, former Vice President Joe Biden was also a big loser in the trial as more evidence surfaced throughout the process of the corruption allegations levied against him.

“He was the front-runner and when they went after President Trump on impeachment, on Ukraine, they really took down Joe Biden, because we knew there was video of him saying he got a prosecutor fired and we knew that there were corruption problems with Hunter Biden and the Biden family,” he explained.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign rally, Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020, in Hudson, N.H. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

This comes after a recent Gallup poll showed President Trump’s approval rating has jumped to the highest it has ever been, following his acquittal in the Senate.

RELATED: Hillary Clinton Speaks Out On President Trump’s Acquittal

Original Article

Looming decision on McGahn testimony could trigger new impeachment fight in House

FILE – In this Feb. 22, 2018, file photo former White House counsel Don McGahn speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), at National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 3:25 PM PT — Friday, February 7, 2020

Democrats appear to be gearing up for a series of new legal battles against the White House. House lawmakers are waiting for guidance, which could be released as early as Friday, on the House Judiciary Committee’s ability to compel testimony from former White House counsel Don McGahn.

Democrats said McGahn has information related to the Mueller report, which could result in new articles of impeachment against the president. If McGahn is allowed to testify, House Intel Chair Jerry Nadler may be able to subpoena John Bolton to testify as well.

President Trump reacted to the new impeachment push by saying he will fight again if he must.

“We will probably have to do it again because these people have gone stone-cold crazy, but I have beaten them all my life and I will beat them again if I have to,” said the president. “What they are doing is very unfair.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., announces the passage of the second article of impeachment, obstruction of Congress, against President Donald Trump by the House of Representatives at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)

Meanwhile, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise said these “people need to be held accountable” for trying to take the president down. On Thursday, Scalise said those who abused their power ought to go to jail.

He added there are “some very crooked people, including some dirty cops, who are still out there.”

Scalise went on to discuss the ongoing DOJ investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation. He said he hopes the lead prosecutor on the case, John Durham, “names names.”

Original Article

President Trump slams Democrats for handling of Iowa caucuses, impeachment

President Donald Trump pauses as he speaks to reporters before boarding Marine One at the White House in Washington, Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, for the short flight to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., and then on to Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 1:00 PM PT — Friday, February 7, 2020

President Trump is mocking Democrats after their major failure in Iowa. On Friday, the president tweeted he thinks Democrats should blame Russia again for their problems.

Attached to his statement was a report by the Associated Press, which said they could not determine a winner from the Iowa caucuses. The outlet has said this was due to too many irregularities in the process as well as the tight margin between presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders.

President Trump noted no one “knows who the real winner is.”

The president further questioned how Democrats will be able to run U.S. healthcare if they can’t even count votes properly.

“They couldn’t even take a simple tabulation, and yet, they’re telling you how to run the country and how to run healthcare,” he said. “Think of it, all the money the Democrats spent and the votes are fried – they have no idea who won.”

In this Feb. 4, 2020 photo, a pedestrian walks past a sign for the Iowa Caucuses on a downtown skywalk, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

The president also spoke out against Democrats’ latest lawsuit against him, which was rejected in D.C.’s Circuit Court of Appeals.

Earlier in the day, he took aim at Democrats in general, saying they have “Trump derangement syndrome.” He said this was on full display when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ripped up a copy of his State of the Union speech.

“Well, I thought it was a terrible thing when she ripped up the speech,” said President Trump. “I thought it was very disrespectful to the chamber, to the country.”

He went on to say the House’s impeachment against him should be expunged because it was “a total political hoax.”

RELATED: President Trump: Schiff And Pelosi Are Lousy, Vicious Politicians

Original Article

Ukrainian lawmakers: U.S. relations remain uncertain despite ‘impeachment hoax’ failure

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, and Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky arrive for a joint news conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday Jan. 31, 2020. (Kevin Lamarque/Pool via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:40 PM PT — Thursday, February 6, 2020

Members of Ukrainian parliament are saying bilateral ties with the U.S. remain uncertain, despite the acquittal of President Trump. On Thursday, Ukrainian lawmakers expressed hope for sensible and businesslike relations with the U.S.

They said ties between the two countries must focus on diplomatic partnership. The MPs also denounced extreme partisanship on Capitol Hill and called out attempts by some U.S. lawmakers to politicize foreign relations.

Officials added the U.S. should develop a coherent bipartisan approach to its foreign policies.

“Ukraine does view the United States as our partner,” stated MP Inna Sovsun. “We do expect that the situation in Washington D.C. around the impeachment will not influence and will not change the bipartisan support that Ukraine has been receiving in the past few years in fighting the Russian aggression in the east and in Crimea.”

Ukrainian lawmakers also said recent headlines have tarnished the image of their country abroad and were a “major disappointment.”

Original Article

McConnell prepares for votes on five judicial nominees after impeachment trial wraps up

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., holds a news conference after the impeachment acquittal of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:54 AM PT — Thursday, February 6, 2020

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is ready to move forward, following the end of the impeachment trial. Just minutes after the final impeachment vote Wednesday, Sen. McConnell (R-Ky.) filed motions to hold votes on five of the president’s judicial nominees.

The move included Andrew Brasher to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit. This shows McConnell and the president remain committed to judicial confirmations, which is something the president reaffirmed during his State of the Union address on Tuesday.

“Working with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, thank you Mitch, and his colleagues in the Senate we have confirmed a record number of 187 new federal judges to uphold our Constitution as written,” stated President Trump. “This includes two brilliant new Supreme Court justices; Neil Gorsuch andBbrett Kavanaugh.”

The Republican-led chamber is expected to begin with the confirmation process of Brasher on February 10th before moving on to four District Court nominees.

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla, questions constitutional scholars during a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee on the constitutional grounds for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Meanwhile, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) filed an ethics complaint against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over her actions during Tuesday’s State of the Union address. He filed the charges with the House Ethics Committee Wednesday.

The Florida congressman has argued that Pelosi’s conduct was beneath the dignity of the House of Representatives and was a potential violation of the law. His complaint refers to Pelosi’s actions when she ripped up the president’s speech.

Rep. Gaetz added, the law does not allow the House speaker to destroy official records. He said “nobody is above the law” and urged that Pelsoi be held accountable for her behavior.

RELATED: House Speaker Pelosi under fire for behavior during the president’s State of the Union address

Original Article

Republicans turn their back on Mitt Romney after impeachment vote

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, right, departs after the impeachment acquittal of President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 3:40 PM PT — Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney is facing extreme blowback for his vote to convict President Trump in the Senate impeachment trial. Earlier on Wednesday, he alleged President Trump committed abuse of power to stay in office.

“The grave question the Constitution tasked senators to answer is whether the president committed an act so extreme and egregious that it rises to the level of a high crime and misdemeanor,” stated Romney. “Yes, he did.”

However, he chose to vote against the obstruction charge, the second article of impeachment against President Trump.

The senator announced his decision on the Senate floor ahead of the full chamber vote. He said he feared his place in history, his oath to God and the Constitution more than he feared the wrath of the Republican Party. The failed presidential nominee also acknowledged the possibility of being a GOP pariah after his decision.

“I’m aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters I will be vehemently denounced. I’m sure to hear abuse from the president and his supporters. Does anyone seriously believe that I would consent to these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath, before God, demanded of me?”

– Mitt Romney, U.S. Senator (R-Utah)

In this image from video, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, speaks on the Senate floor about the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

Sen. Romney was right. Those closest to the president immediately called him out on Twitter.

Donald Trump Jr. said the senator was “forever bitter that he will never be president” and recommended his expulsion from the GOP.

Congressman Lee Zeldin weighed in, saying Romney “absolutely despises that Donald Trump was elected president” and he was not. He went on to say his “sore loser mentality launched this sham impeachment.”

RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel criticized Romney’s vote on Twitter. She said this isn’t the first time she has disagreed with Romney and suggested their tensions may deepen going forward.

She added the president did nothing wrong and the GOP was largely united in his defense.

Original Article

Senate acquits President Trump on both articles of impeachment

President Donald Trump departs following a Christmas Eve video teleconference with members of the military at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:25 PM PT — Wednesday, February 5, 2020

History was made on Wednesday following the Senate’s final vote in the impeachment trial of President Trump. Lawmakers formally struck down both articles of impeachment, acquitting the president on both charges.

The Senate voted 52 to 48 against Article One: Abuse of Power.

Sen. Mitt Romney was the sole Republican to side with Democrats, voting against the president on the first article.

However, Republicans stood united on Article Two: Obstruction of Congress. Lawmakers voted 53 to 47 to acquit the president on this charge.

“It is therefore ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be, and he is hereby, acquitted of the charges in said articles,” stated Chief Justice Roberts.

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the CenturyLink Center, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Bossier City, La. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Wednesday’s vote marked the end of a historic period in our nation’s history. It began last year with a whistleblower complaint, which was followed by House hearings, an impeachment vote and the Senate trial.

Following the final vote, President Trump said he would be delivering a public statement on Thursday to “discuss our country’s victory on the impeachment hoax.”

Original Article

Trump defense team: Acquittal is the only appropriate result of Impeachment trial

President Donald Trump walks to a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:15 PM PT — Monday, February 3, 2020

President Trump is raising questions about the so-called whistleblower as well as House impeachment manager Adam Schiff. In a tweet Monday, the president blasted Schiff for making up details about his conversation with the president of Ukraine.

This comes after Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C) said in an interview over the weekend that the whistleblower would be called before the Senate Intelligence Committee after the impeachment trial.

Meanwhile, House managers and the Trump defense team delivered closing arguments on the Senate floor Monday. Lead Democrat manager Schiff urged lawmakers in the upper chamber to convict and remove the president from office based on their weeks-long case.

However, the president’s defense gave their rebuttal to the Democrat arguments. They said the House majority is looking for an excuse to nullify the votes of millions of Americans.

The closing statements came ahead of Tuesday’s last debate over the articles of impeachment before Wednesday’s vote to either convict or acquit President Trump.

RELATED: Republican senators lay groundwork for bringing impeachment trial to a close

Original Article

Sen. Alexander: If you start with partisan impeachment, you’re destined to have partisan acquittal

Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, talks to reporters as he arrives at the Capitol for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, in Washington, Friday, Jan. 31, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:05 PM PT — Sunday, February 2, 2020

Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander said he had a “light bulb moment” when contemplating his vote to call witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial. During a recent interview, Alexander said he realized the Senate should not be the one to decide who does and doesn’t run for president in 2020.

“It struck me really for the first time,” he said. “We’re not just being asked, we’re saying, ‘Tell him he can’t run in the 2020 elections.’”

Alexander said the American people are the ones who should have the power, which is why he voted ‘no’ on Friday.

“It’s up to the American people to say, ‘Okay, good economy, lower taxes, conservative judges, behavior that I might not like, call to Ukraine…,’” he said. “(They can) weigh that against Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and pick a president.”

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Drake University, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

The senator added after so many hours and so much information, he also didn’t need more evidence to make his decision. He said he was positive the president’s actions were not impeachable.

When asked if the Senate’s partisan vote will set a dangerous precedent, Alexander said, “If you start out with a partisan impeachment, you’re almost destined to have a partisan acquittal.” However, he pointed out the Senate made sure to do its due diligence.

“I helped make sure that we didn’t dismiss it, we heard it. There were some who wanted to dismiss it. I helped make sure that we had a right to ask for more evidence, if we needed it, which we thought we didn’t. We saw video tapes of 192 times that witnesses testified, we sat there for 11 to 12 hour days for nine days. So, I think we heard the case pretty well.” – Lamar Alexander, U.S. Senator (R-TN.)

Moving forward, Alexander was confident the Senate will acquit the president in their final vote this week. He added impeachment should only be used as an extremely rare tool for grave bipartisan concerns.

RELATED: Senate Votes Against Witnesses, Documents In Trial

Original Article

Republican senators lay groundwork for bringing impeachment trial to a close

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., pauses as he talks to the media outside the Senate chamber during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the Capitol Friday Jan 31, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:45 PM PT — Saturday, February 1, 2020

Republican senators are laying the groundwork for ending the impeachment trial. Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt said there will be no weekend session and senators will return on Monday for four more hours of closing arguments.

Lawmakers will then be able to debate the issues into Tuesday. Blunt added the final vote on the two impeachment articles will take place no later than 4:00p.m. EST on Wednesday.

“We decided the best thing for everyone involved is to come to that certain date, but try to eliminate any pain and suffering,” he said. “As if this hasn’t been painful enough.”

On Twitter, the lawmaker added the Democrats’ case used “two of the weakest articles of impeachment” to make a “half-baked case.”

“House Democrats can’t bring a half-baked case to the Senate and expect us to make something of it,” stated Sen. Blunt. “These are two of the weakest articles of impeachment you could possibly have.”

In this image from video, Senators cast their vote on the motion to allow additional witnesses and evidence to be allowed in the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 31, 2020. The motion failed with a vote of 51-49. (Senate Television via AP)

The announcement came after the Senate voted to block any witness testimonies on Thursday. In a 51 to 49 vote, senators shut down all attempts to introduce more evidence in the case.

Senators Lisa Murkowski and Lamar Alexander, among a few others, were considered key swing votes in the decision. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell previously predicted the outcome of the vote and has since weighed in with a new statement.

“There is no need for the Senate to re-open the investigation, which the House Democratic majority chose to conclude and which the Managers themselves continue to describe as ‘overwhelming’ and ‘beyond any doubt.’ Never in Senate history has this body paused an impeachment trial to pursue additional witnesses with unresolved questions of executive privilege that would require protracted litigation. We have no interest in establishing such a new precedent, particularly for individuals whom the House expressly chose not to pursue.” – Mitch McConnell, U.S. Senator

CONTINUE READING: Senate Votes Against Witnesses, Documents In Trial

Original Article

Chief Justice Roberts remains neutral during impeachment trial

Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, right, arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 31, 2020, for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. (AP Photo/ Jacquelyn Martin)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:40 PM PT — Saturday, February 1, 2020

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts’ goal to remain neutral during the impeachment trial may have helped protect his reputation. The presiding judge has reportedly gone through the trial virtually unscathed.

A senior fellow at the Brookings Institution said Roberts’ success came from him not making himself the story. Democrats had called for the chief justice to play a larger role in the witness vote on Friday. However, he refused and said the decision should be made by senators.

“I think it would be inappropriate for me, an unelected official from a different branch of government, to assert the power to change that result so that the motion would succeed,” said Roberts.

In this image from video, presiding officer Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 31, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

On Twitter, Rep. Andy Biggs noted that Sen. Elizabeth Warren and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi were grasping at straws when they called into question the legitimacy of the judicial branch. Biggs suggested this is all they have after the impeachment case fell apart.

His tweet referred to a question Warren presented during the Senate trial.

“At a time when large majorities of Americans have lost faith in government, does the fact that the chief justice is presiding over an impeachment trial – in which Republican senators have thus far refused to allow witnesses or evidence – contribute to the loss of legitimacy of the chief justice, the Supreme Court and the Constitution?” asked Sen. Warren.

Her question appeared to backfire as the Senate voted to reject the motion to call further witnesses.

However, Roberts may find himself in the political spotlight again in March, when the Supreme Court will decide whether or not to release President Trump’s financial records.

Original Article

House Speaker Pelosi chastises President Trump’s impeachment defense team

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives as defense arguments by the Republicans resume in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:36 AM PT — Friday, January 31, 2020

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested President Trump’s legal team should be disbarred. While speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday, she claimed the president’s defense is trying to undermine the Constitution by saying the president can do anything that benefits his reelection.

The California Democrat also said she doesn’t know how the defense could make such statements and retain their status as an attorney.

Pelosi went on to address the possibility of an acquittal in the impeachment trial. She made the following statement in regards to this possibility:

“Well, he will not be acquitted. You cannot be acquitted if you don’t have a trial, and you don’t have a trial if you don’t have witnesses and documentation and that. I would hope that the senators, if it comes to a tie or if there is a question of hearing testimony or receiving documents, would leave it up to the chief justice of the Supreme Court…”

The House speaker also went on to claim President Trump does not know right from wrong, and said she is praying that senators will have the courage to handle the truth and call for witness testimony.

RELATED: President Trump criticizes Pelosi and House Democrats over impeachment, Iran

Original Article

McConnell has support needed to kill impeachment witness vote

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks to the chamber for President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:30 PM PT — Thursday, January 30, 2020

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he is confident he will have the votes needed to stop Democrats from calling more impeachment witnesses. This came after McConnell said he was unsure if he would have the support needed to kill the vote earlier this week.

Democrats would need four Republicans to vote with them in order to call more witnesses for the trial.

“I hope that we have just four Republicans, all we need is four, who rise to the occasion and say we need to find out the truth,” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

Former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland Michael Steele said McConnell spoke with senators, like Lisa Murkowski, who were considered potential swing votes in hopes of persuading them to vote in line with the party.

“There will be no more witnesses and there will be no new evidence that will be introduced because you’re not going to get the fourth senator,” said Steele. “That fourth senator is not going to land because Mitch McConnell has such a tight grip on this process.”

If the Senate kills the vote as expected, the upper chamber could move forward with a vote to formally acquit the president as early as Friday.

RELATED: Sen. McConnell Slams Democrats For ‘Celebrating’ Impeachment, Republicans Debate Possible Trial Testimonies

Original Article

President Trump’s defense team set up their final defense in the impeachment trial

In this image from video, White House deputy counsel Patrick Philbin speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:54 AM PT — Tuesday, January 29, 2020

President Trump’s impeachment team set up their final defense in the impeachment trial. The defense team wrapped up their opening arguments Tuesday, giving their last uninterrupted remarks against the pair of articles. They emphasized the articles don’t hold merit and don’t match what the framers of the Constitution envisioned.

“And what we see in the House managers charges and their definition of abuse of power is exactly antithetical to the framers approach because their very premise for their abuse of power charge is that it is entirely based on subjective motive, not object of standards, not predefined offenses,” explained White House deputy counsel Patrick Philbin.

The defense team also stressed the political gravity of removing the president under these charges, pointing out that it would set a “dangerous” precedent. They said it would overturn the last election as well as interfere with the upcoming 2020 election.

“What they are asking you to do is to throw out a successful president on the eve of an election with no basis and in violation of the Constitution,” said White House counsel Pat Cipollone. “It would dangerously change our country and weaken, weaken forever, all of our democratic institutions.”

In this image from video, White House counsel Pat Cipollone speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

The president’s team also tackled concerns coming from former National Security Advisor John Bolton. In his new book, Bolton alleges President Trump explicitly told him he would withdraw aid from Ukraine if they didn’t investigate former Vice President Joe Biden. The team responded to the allegations by quoting the president himself who said the conversation never took place. Attorney Jay Sekulow read the follow response:

“I never told John Bolton that the aid to Ukraine was tied to investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens. In fact, he never complained about this at the time of his very public termination. If John Bolton said this, it was only to sell a book.”

Officials are expected to vote Friday on whether to call witnesses or produce more documents.

RELATED: Sen. Cruz says Hunter Biden would be most important witness

Original Article

‘The Ukraine Hoax: Impeachment, Biden Cash, Mass Murder’ debuting this weekend on OAN

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:18 PM PT — Friday, January 24, 2020

OAN’s Jack Posobiec sat down with Michael Caputo to discuss his new special, “One America News Investigates – The Ukraine Hoax: Impeachment, Biden Cash, Mass Murder.”

In the documentary, Caputo exposes the cover-up that led to the impeachment of President Donald Trump and mass murder. The Democrats’ crusade to kick our duly elected president out of office didn’t start with a phone call. It began with Ukrainian corruption, election meddling and a bloody coup that cleared a path for Hunter Biden to get rich.

Tune in this weekend, Saturday and Sunday at 10PM EST / 7PM PST – only on One America News!



Original Article

Senators cope with archaic impeachment rules

In this image from video, House impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., walks to the podium to speak during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:53 AM PT — Friday, January 24, 2020

As the impeachment trial continues it’s hours-long sessions in the Senate, members of the jury are reportedly bending some of the rules in order to keep their sanity.

One rule, which has been repeatedly dismissed from senators on both sides of the aisle, is staying seated for the duration of arguments. At least 20 seats were reportedly counted as empty during Adam Schiff’s speech Wednesday night. Many senators were seen walking around to stretch their legs, but some reporters alleged many were not even present in the chamber.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Sen. Cory Booker (R-N.J.) were allegedly spotted in their respective party’s cloak rooms on their smart phones amid rules of no phones or devices of any kind on the Senate floor. Other lawmakers were seen still wearing their Apple watches while the proceedings were underway.

Another rule which is being overlooked is only water, milk and candy are allowed during the proceedings. Sen. Elizabeth Warren confirmed to reporters that she snuck in a cup of yogurt.

A former Senate parliamentarian told CNN the practice of consuming milk began in 1966 after one presiding Senate officer said, “Senate rules do not prohibit a senator from sipping milk during his speech.”

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), who is also a doctor, told reporters the milk precedent goes to lawmakers health. He said milk was used as a home remedy for peptic ulcer disease when there was no treatment for the condition back in the 1950’s.

Meanwhile, one Senate lawmaker is taking full advantage of the rule allowing candy. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) set up what he calls “the candy desk.” Toomey’s spokesperson said the candy desk is bipartisan and is even open to independents. “The candy desk” actually dates back to 1965 when former California Republican George Murphy reportedly enjoyed a candy bar now-and-then when it was convenient.

There’s also the unspoken rule of being bored. With no foreign objects allowed during oral arguments, one lawmaker has gone the extra mile to ensure fellow senators stay awake. Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) handed out so-called “fidget spinners” and other toys to his Republican colleagues during Thursdays GOP lunch. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) was later seen twirling a purple spinner at his desk, while distracting other Republicans.

Sen. Richard Burr R-NC., displays a stress ball as he walks to the Senate Chamber prior to the start of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Others are passing the time by either drawing or reading books.

“Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye. All persons are commanded to keep silent on pain of imprisonment, while the Senate of the United States is sitting for the trial of the articles of impeachment.”

— Michael Stenger, Sergeant at Arms – U.S. Senate

While some of the conduct may be considered petty and small, it is unknown if the Senate sergeant at arms will enforce any of the alleged violations.

RELATED: State attorneys general say Impeachment is ‘legally flawed’

Original Article

Senators cope with archaic impeachment rules

In this image from video, House impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., walks to the podium to speak during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

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UPDATED 6:53 AM PT — Friday, January 24, 2020

As the impeachment trial continues it’s hours-long sessions in the Senate, members of the jury are reportedly bending some of the rules in order to keep their sanity.

One rule, which has been repeatedly dismissed from senators on both sides of the aisle, is staying seated for the duration of arguments. At least 20 seats were reportedly counted as empty during Adam Schiff’s speech Wednesday night. Many senators were seen walking around to stretch their legs, but some reporters alleged many were not even present in the chamber.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Sen. Cory Booker (R-N.J.) were allegedly spotted in their respective party’s cloak rooms on their smart phones amid rules of no phones or devices of any kind on the Senate floor. Other lawmakers were seen still wearing their Apple watches while the proceedings were underway.

Another rule which is being overlooked is only water, milk and candy are allowed during the proceedings. Sen. Elizabeth Warren confirmed to reporters that she snuck in a cup of yogurt.

A former Senate parliamentarian told CNN the practice of consuming milk began in 1966 after one presiding Senate officer said, “Senate rules do not prohibit a senator from sipping milk during his speech.”

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), who is also a doctor, told reporters the milk precedent goes to lawmakers health. He said milk was used as a home remedy for peptic ulcer disease when there was no treatment for the condition back in the 1950’s.

Meanwhile, one Senate lawmaker is taking full advantage of the rule allowing candy. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) set up what he calls “the candy desk.” Toomey’s spokesperson said the candy desk is bipartisan and is even open to independents. “The candy desk” actually dates back to 1965 when former California Republican George Murphy reportedly enjoyed a candy bar now-and-then when it was convenient.

There’s also the unspoken rule of being bored. With no foreign objects allowed during oral arguments, one lawmaker has gone the extra mile to ensure fellow senators stay awake. Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) handed out so-called “fidget spinners” and other toys to his Republican colleagues during Thursdays GOP lunch. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) was later seen twirling a purple spinner at his desk, while distracting other Republicans.

Sen. Richard Burr R-NC., displays a stress ball as he walks to the Senate Chamber prior to the start of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Others are passing the time by either drawing or reading books.

“Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye. All persons are commanded to keep silent on pain of imprisonment, while the Senate of the United States is sitting for the trial of the articles of impeachment.” — Michael Stenger, Sergeant at Arms – U.S. Senate

While some of the conduct may be considered petty and small, it is unknown if the Senate sergeant at arms will enforce any of the alleged violations.

RELATED: State attorneys general say Impeachment is ‘legally flawed’

Original Article