Rep. Issa: Border Patrol Officers Retiring Over Migrant Situation

getfile.aspxguid35689EB8 FD4E 4549 BD56 8E967BD19E30

Rep. Issa: Border Patrol Officers Retiring Over Migrant Situation darrell issa speaks in hearing Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) speaks as U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken testifies before the House Committee On Foreign Affairs March 10, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Ting Shen-Pool/Getty Images)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Monday, 05 April 2021 09:38 AM

There is "already" a mass exodus of Customs and Border Patrol officers who are retiring or seeking other government work because of the spiraling situation at the nation's southern border and President Joe Biden's policies, Rep. Darrell Issa said Monday.

"What we are seeing is that anyone who can retire is retiring," the California Republican said on Fox News' "Fox and Friends." "Many are applying for other federal jobs. It's a demoralizing time and it's only going to get worse."

His comments come as more Americans disapprove than approve of how Biden is handling the immigration situation with thousands of unaccompanied migrant children showing up at the U.S.-Mexico border and larger immigration efforts, according to a new Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll.

The survey found that 40% of Americans disapprove of Biden’s handling of children reaching the border alone, compared with just 24% who approve. Thirty-five percent don't have an opinion either way.

Meanwhile, migrants are being sent to aging military bases across the country, and that is adding to the stresses being felt by agents from the Border Patrol and with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said Issa.

"Every time they find these remote facilities, that's more people within the system, the most challenged systems," said Issa. Border Patrol and ICE find themselves basically guarding people that shouldn't be in the country. They certainly shouldn't be sitting on old retired World War II military base re-purposed to hold these people. Not since the Haitian boat lift have we seen this kind of volume of people being placed on military bases."

In late March, the Pentagon approved a request from the Department of Health and Human Services to temporarily place unaccompanied migrant children at two Texas military bases, according to a CNN report. Children were to stay in a vacant dormitory at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland and temporary housing was to be built on an empty plot of land.

The Pentagon is also reviewing a request to house migrant children at Camp Roberts in California, chief Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said last week.

"We do have the request in the building. We are analyzing it as we have the others," Kirby told reporters during a news briefing at the Pentagon.

On Tuesday, the Department of Health and Human Services, who submitted the request for support to the DoD, conducted a site visit of the National Guard base in central California to determine whether it could be used as another location to temporarily house migrant children.

The Paso Robles Daily News reports that the California Department of Health and Human Services is sisting Camp Roberts with housing children ages 4 to 18 years old for four to six weeks. The initial request was for 1,500 beds but it could go higher, according to the news report.

The Biden administration has reportedly asked government employees to volunteer to go to the border to help with the influx of migrants, and Issa said that for some of what's going on, trained people aren't needed.

"It doesn't take a trained border patrol agent to basically say come on, get in the bus, and let's move you into America, and that's what's beginning to happen," said Issa. "The border patrol, with a rare exception of some high-value targets and a few recognized drug people for the most part they are, asked to be part of a welcome mat. There is no question at all."

He also said that the use of military bases like Camp Roberts ad the further use of federal troops will also "continue to spin out," as there will probably be more than 200,000 "so-called refugees in the way migrants coming north.

"Caravans that are absolutely forming to come north are going to dwarf anything that we have seen before," he warned.

Original Article

Trump Puts Off Presidential Library

getfile.aspxguidE477AFA5 2F1F 4777 9C51 3DA963B8978E

Trump Puts Off Presidential Library donald trump stands onstage under spotlight Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Mark Niquette and Jennifer Jacobs Monday, 05 April 2021 07:11 AM

Donald Trump is spending his first months as an ex-president trying to ensure that he’s remembered the way he wants — but he’s holding off on plans to establish a library that would enshrine his version of his presidency.

Planning for a library would suggest he’s done being president and that’s not something he’s ready to concede, say people familiar with his thinking. Trump has publicly dangled the possibility that he will seek the Republican nomination in 2024.

“Once he says, ‘I am going to be raising money for my library,’ he’s given up even the pretense of trying to run again,” said Anthony Clark, who has written about the politics and history of presidential libraries.

By delaying a library, Trump puts aside, at least for now, a chance to shape the story of his presidency — as Richard Nixon initially did at his museum by describing the Watergate scandal as a Democrat coup attempt, or as George W. Bush did with a theater that allows participants to vote on the options that he faced such as whether to invade Iraq but ends with a video of Bush explaining his decision.

All presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have pursued a presidential library as a way to archive and house their records for researchers as well as to burnish their legacies. Bill Clinton joked at Bush’s library opening in 2013 that it was the “latest, grandest example of the eternal struggle of former presidents to rewrite history.”

Before Barack Obama, presidents created nonprofit foundations to raise money from private donors to build libraries and museums that they then donated or leased to the federal government to staff and operate using taxpayer funds. The foundations pay for and create the exhibits, with the National Archives helping to develop the content.

Obama is having his private foundation build and administer his presidential center while allowing the National Archives to handle his records. Nixon initially did that as well with the library he opened in 1990 at his birthplace of Yorba Linda, California, before it was turned over to the government to run in 2007.

Clark said he doubts that Trump will ever have a presidential library because of how expensive and complicated they are to build, how difficult it is to secure a location, and because he didn’t start raising money and planning before leaving office as other presidents did.

Obama started his library foundation in 2014 for an expected $500 million presidential center in Chicago, his adopted hometown, but groundbreaking isn’t expected until this year because of delays from federal reviews and litigation.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center, which includes a library with his records, a museum, the Bush policy institute, and the offices of Bush’s foundation, opened on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas — former first lady Laura Bush’s alma mater — in 2013 after finalists for the site were announced in 2005.

The National Archives has already set up a Trump Presidential Library website with information about the former president and first lady Melania Trump, and holds the records of the Trump administration, which will start to become available in 2026 — though Trump can restrict access for 12 years.

While Trump may want the imprimatur of a library run by the federal government, he’d likely follow Obama’s and Nixon’s early model of having the National Archives handle records separately from a museum that he can fully control, said Timothy Naftali, who served as the first director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum after it became part of the federal system and created a new, nonpartisan Watergate gallery.

If Trump built a private library or tourist attraction for his supporters, that would allow him to depict his presidency the way he wants, Naftali said.

“His museum will have the same spirit as the private Nixon library’s museum,” said Naftali, now a presidential scholar and a clinical associate professor at New York University. “His tweets could be used as the banners for various galleries in the museum. It’ll be a center of Trumpism.”

With the delay, Trump is not only letting others write the history of his presidency, he’s giving up one opportunity to deploy his wildly successful fund-raising skills. Trump and his affiliated committees have raised more than $2.3 billion since he began his presidential campaign in 2015.

He told supporters before he left office in January that he wanted to raise $2 billion for a presidential library, according to The Washington Post, which would be the most ever. The most likely vehicle would be a nonprofit charity, the model used by modern presidents, because donations are tax deductible and the entity doesn’t have to pay tax on the money it raises, said Paul Seamus Ryan of the government-accountability group Common Cause.

He could legally accept money in unlimited amounts from sources including foreign countries, and disclosure of the donors’ identities isn’t required except by registered lobbyists who give $200 or more.

Yet such a charity requires that expenditures are used for the public good and not for private benefit of individuals.

Still, a former Nixon library official says that shouldn’t stop Trump from raising money for it.

“Donald Trump proved in 2020 that he had no problems raising money, and he now has four years, if he wants to, to just dangle that prospect of a return to power in front of potential donors,” said Paul Musgrave, a former special assistant to the director at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

Original Article