VA. teen charged after opening fire on parents

Picture of wanted poster of Levi Henry Norwood. (Fauquier County Sheriff’s Department)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:46 PM PT — Sunday, February 16, 2020

A manhunt for a Virginia teen, accused of opening fire on his family, has come to an end. 17-year-old Levi Norwood was taken into custody in North Carolina Saturday evening.

Norwood allegedly shot his parents and younger brother in Fauquier County on Friday. The mother and child were killed in their home. The father, however, survived after entering the house and seeing his wife and child dead. That’s when the teen shot him as well, but he managed to escape with gunshot wounds.

Norwood fled the scene in a red Toyota Camry, but he was later apprehended after being caught shoplifting in the next state over.

There was a large operation underway across different departments to take the teen into custody.

“When they reported to the scene, they observed a 6-year-old child that had been killed, the mother of the child, and also the father had been shot as well,” stated sheriff Bob Mosier of Fauquiier County. “He’s (the father) in stable condition at the hospital.”

Norwood is facing two-counts of murder. A motive for the attack remains under investigation.

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Rep. McCarthy leads opening prayer at National Prayer Breakfast

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) is picuted. (AP Photo)

OAN NEWSROOM
UPDATED 11:38 AM PT — Thursday, February 6, 2020

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) called for unity in Congress, while leading the opening prayer at the National Prayer Breakfast. He also mentioned the divisiveness of Congress during Thursday’s prayer.

The event came after the president’s acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial on Wednesday. Rep. McCarthy said the Lord could not have picked a better day to bring everyone together in prayer. The congressman went on to ask God to watch over Democrat and GOP leaders as well as the entire Congress.

“Lord, we pray for the leaders in Congress; Mitch McConnell, Nancy Pelosi, and Chuck Schumer,” stated the House minority leader. “Please guide us out of tearing division and into unity in doing the people’s business.”

The National Prayer Breakfast is a yearly tradition, which aims to be a platform to discuss the role of faith in politics.

Meanwhile, President Trump was also in attendance at the National Prayer Breakfast, where he was seen celebrating the end of the Democrat-led impeachment trial.

The president showed off the the “USA Today” newspaper with the one-word headline “Acquitted” splashed on the front page. He waved the publication to the audience with House Speaker Pelosi just steps away on the same stage.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi of Calif., listens as President Donald Trump speaks at the 68th annual National Prayer Breakfast, at the Washington Hilton, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

“As everybody knows, my family, our great country and your president have been put through a terrible ordeal by some very dishonest and corrupt people,” said President Trump. “They have done everything possible to destroy us and by doing so, very badly hurt our nation.”

The Senate voted on Wednesday to acquit the president on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, bringing the weeks-long trial to an end.

RELATED: Senate Votes ‘Not Guilty’ In Final Impeachment Vote

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Could Dems defect in Trump impeachment trial? McConnell sees opening

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Speaking on impeachment, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says House Democrats are conducting

The Democratic senators who hail from states won by President Trump in 2016 are being eyed as possible acquittal votes in a Senate impeachment trial, as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he believes at least a Democrat or two could defect.

It comes as the House barrels toward a floor vote on impeachment planned for Wednesday. If articles of impeachment are approved as expected, the Senate would follow with a trial in early 2020 where senators act as jurors.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if we got one or two Democrats,” McConnell, R-Ky., said during a recent appearance on Fox News' “Hannity."

HANNITY EXCLUSIVE: MCCONNELL SAYS 'ZERO CHANCE' TRUMP IS REMOVED, 'ONE OR TWO DEMOCRATS' COULD VOTE TO ACQUIT

The most popular parlor game right now in Washington focuses on the House side — specifically, on which Democrats from Trump-won districts would vote to impeach, or defect, even though impeachment is widely seen as inevitable. On the Senate side, where Republicans hold the majority and the threshold for conviction is a steep two-thirds majority, Trump is expected to easily be acquitted. But Republicans nevertheless would like to peel off a Democrat or more in the upper chamber, which could make the vote bipartisan.

A source familiar with Senate impeachment trial plans told Fox News that Republicans believe the Democrats most likely to vote to acquit are Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., and Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., both of whom represent red states that went for Trump in 2016.

Manchin is still undecided, according to a source familiar with his thinking. In a recent appearance on CNN, Manchin said, "I'm very much torn on it. I think it weighs on everybody."

Another source said they believe Jones — who is up for re-election next year in the pro-Trump state and is often considered the most vulnerable incumbent — is likely to be the first Democrat defection.

Jones told a local interviewer this week that “I’m concerned that the impeachment inquiry is going to hurt the country," lamenting how it has become such "a partisan issue now."

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va, and Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., are believed to be possible votes to acquit the president in an impeachment trial. (AP/Reuters)

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va, and Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., are believed to be possible votes to acquit the president in an impeachment trial. (AP/Reuters)

Other Democratic senators believed to be in play are Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz. Trump carried both states in 2016.

Sinema is the first Democrat elected to represent the typically red-leaning state in the Senate since 1995. Sinema has not signaled publicly which way she would vote on impeachment.

Peters recently told local journalists that, "It’s important to collect all of the facts regarding the situation, and certainly what facts are out there are very troublesome."

“Those four Democrats are damned if they do and damned if they don’t,” a senior GOP aide told Fox News, referring to Manchin, Jones, Peters and Sinema. “They will have to resist the Trump derangement syndrome that is consuming their Democrat colleagues.”

Meanwhile, Senate Democrats are making the case that Republicans could join them in a vote to convict Trump. Those most often mentioned as possibilities are Sens. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, who has not shied from criticizing Trump; Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska; Susan Collins, R-Maine; and Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who sometimes crosses party lines in votes.

But Republican sources told Fox News that none of those lawmakers have signaled any movement on the final Senate vote on whether to remove the president from office, and McConnell has said it has been his goal from the beginning to keep Republicans together on the issue.

The source also told Fox News that a recent letter penned by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., laying out his proposed parameters for what a Senate impeachment trial would look like and which witnesses should be included did not move the needle one way or the other for Republicans whose votes could be wavering.

IN TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, SENATE GOP COULD TURN TABLES ON DEMS

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“My hope is that there won’t be a single Republican who votes for either of these articles in the House,” McConnell told “Hannity,” while also saying that the impeachment case is “so darn weak” and that the outcome is easy to predict.

“There is no chance the president is going to be removed from office,” McConnell said last week, noting that he has “no choice but to take it up” but the trial would be “in total coordination with the White House counsel’s office and the people who are representing the president.”

At the center of the impeachment inquiry is Trump’s efforts to press Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to launch politically related investigations—regarding former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter’s dealings in Ukraine, as well as issues related to the 2016 presidential election. The president’s request came after millions in U.S. military aid to Ukraine had been frozen, which Democrats have argued shows a “quid pro quo” arrangement. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.

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The House Judiciary Committee on Friday voted to adopt two articles of impeachment against Trump, alleging abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, on a party-line vote of 23-17. A final roll call in the full House is expected Wednesday.

A massive impeachment report issued this past weekend by Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., stated: "This continued solicitation of foreign interference in a U.S. election, as well as President Trump’s other actions, present a clear and present danger that the President will continue to use the power of his office for his personal political gain."

Original Article