President Trump: ‘Sen. Manchin was a puppet for Schumer, Pelosi during impeachment hoax’

FILE – In this Feb. 5, 2020, file photo, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks with reporters after President Donald Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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UPDATED 6:40 AM PT — Saturday, February 15, 2020

President Trump said he was very surprised about Sen. Joe Manchin’s (D-W.Va.) vote for conviction during the impeachment trial. In a string of tweets, the president said Manchin voted against him in the Democrats’ “totally partisan impeachment hoax.”

He added that “no president has done more for the great people of West Virginia than me.”

The president went on to say “every Republican, except Romney,…voted against impeachment.” He then took a jab at Manchin by saying “he was just a puppet for Schumer and Pelosi.”

This came after Manchin said he would consider endorsing President Trump for reelection. On Thursday, the senator emphasized “everybody can change” and that he’s “not ruling anything out.”

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks with reporters after President Donald Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

This seeming reversal of opinion left many scratching their heads following his vote for conviction just weeks earlier.

“Over the duration of this trial, I have listened carefully,” Manchin previously stated. “The House managers have presented a strong case, showing what the president did was wrong.”

Manchin has been known to be a leader in the Senate and often crossed party lines to vote for what he believes is right. He’s even used his swing vote in critical situations to help push conservative issues, such as the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh.

However, this new reversal has many questioning his belief system.

He has called this switch “the most difficult and serious decision any senator could face.” He also voted to pass the controversial War Powers bill this week, which would limited President Trump’s ability to take military action against Iran.

Original Article

Pelosi backs President Trump’s warnings on Huawei

Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the US House of Representatives, speaks on the first day of the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Friday, Feb.14, 2020. (Sven Hoppe/dpa via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:25 PM PT — Friday, February 14, 2020

On Friday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged foreign nations to completely cut ties with Chinese telecom giant Huawei. At a security conference in Germany, Pelosi stated that choosing to do business with the company is essentially choosing autocracy over democracy.

Pelosi noted that Huawei is becoming more dangerous than ever as it builds its 5G network, which could bring in new business partners. She encouraged the international community to come together to create alternatives to the company.

“If you want to build a collective conscience of values and respect for human rights, don’t go Huawei,” she said. “Instead, let’s internationalize, build something together that will be about freedom of information.”

On Thursday, the U.S. filed new charges against Huawei, including the company’s alleged theft of trade secrets from U.S.-based companies.

Officials said the company’s successful efforts to steal trade secrets and technology gave it a “significant and unfair competitive advantage.” This comes just days after officials said Huawei has covert access to mobile phone networks.

FILE – In this Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, the logos of Huawei are displayed at its retail shop window reflecting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs office in Beijing. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Meanwhile, the deadline for U.S. businesses to cut ties with the Chinese tech company has been delayed for the fourth time. Earlier on Thursday, the Trump administration granted Huawei a temporary license to continue working with American companies for another 45 days.

The Commerce Department said a number of rural broadband carriers rely on the tech company.

Huawei was blacklisted by the administration last May after it was deemed a national security risk. The company has responded to these allegations by accusing the Justice Department of attempting to “irrevocably damage Huawei’s reputation” and business.

“The U.S. Department of Justice’s new charges against Huawei are part of this campaign, this is political persecution, plain and simple,” read their latest statement.

Original Article

President Trump: Schiff and Pelosi are lousy, vicious politicians

President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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UPDATED 4:06 PM PT — Thursday, February 6, 2020

President Trump blasted Adam Schiff and Nancy Pelosi for spearheading the failed impeachment effort against him. In his address to the nation on Thursday, the president said Schiff and Pelosi led a partisan attack on his administration under the pretext of defending “American democracy.”

He added the two Democrats used unfair and questionable methods to achieve their political goals. He said the failure of the impeachment hoax has exposed their true intentions.

“I’ve always said they’re lousy politicians, but they do two things: They’re vicious and mean,” said President Trump. “Adam Schiff is a vicious, horrible person (and) Nancy Pelosi is a horrible person.”

The president also ripped into Republican Sen. Mitt Romney, who voted against him during the Senate impeachment trial.

“Had failed presidential candidate Mitt Romney devoted the same energy and anger to defeating a faltering Barack Obama as he sanctimoniously does to me, he could have won the election,” President Trump said on Twitter.

He went on to emphasize that a political attack like the “Russia witch hunt” must never happen again. The president said his administration had to “go through hell” despite doing nothing wrong. President Trump then slammed former FBI Director James Comey and Democrat officials for weaponizing government agencies against him.

“We were treated unbelievably unfairly. And you have to understand, we first went through Russia, Russia, Russia. It was all bullshit. We then went through the Mueller report. They should have come back one day later, they didn’t. They came back two years later after lives were ruined, after people went bankrupt, after people lost all their money.” – President Donald Trump

The president also warned that witch hunts and hoaxes can very quickly go out of control and may inflict great damage to the U.S.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., holds up a copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress that she tore up on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. At left Rep. Billy Long, R-Mo. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Meanwhile, Democrat Party officials have shown no sign of remorse for their failed attacks on the president. On Thursday, House lawmakers rejected a Republican-proposed measure to condemn Nancy Pelosi for tearing up a copy of President Trump’s latest State of the Union address.

GOP lawmakers said the House speaker’s actions were appalling and shameful. However, Pelosi claimed she ripped up the president’s speech to “get attention” and added she doesn’t need lessons on dignity.

Rep. Mike Johnson has accused her of committing a felony, citing a rule about the destruction of official House records. Johnson said Pelosi broke the rule when she ripped a copy of the president’s speech on Tuesday night.

The Louisiana Republican said President Trump gave Pelosi a copy for her to protect, not to destroy, which could make her criminally liable. He then blasted pundits, who argued the documents were Pelosi’s personal property and not official government papers.

Congressman Matt Gaetz has since announced he’ll file an ethics complaint against Pelosi.

CONTINUE READING: President Trump Celebrates His Acquittal At The White House

Original Article

House Speaker Pelosi under fire for behavior during the president’s State of the Union address

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., tears her copy of President Donald Trump’s s State of the Union address after he delivered it to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

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UPDATED 12:48 PM PT — Wednesday, February 5, 2020

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi added fuel to the partisan fire during the president’s State of the Union address. Both Senate and House Republicans are criticizing Pelosi for her actions on Tuesday.

At the start of the night, President Trump gave copies of his speech to Vice President Pence and the House speaker. While doing so, the president seemingly overlooked the speaker’s attempt to shake his hand. Many claimed this move was unintentional because he didn’t shake the vice president’s hand either.

However, Pelosi may have taken offense and went on to cut the president’s introduction short. She left out customary language, including the speaker’s tradition of saying he or she has the “high honor and distinct privilege” of presenting the president.

Pelosi has stated she did not intend the omission as a snub. However, as the president finished his remarks, the senator made it a point to tear up her copy of the speech. She later waved the pieces at those left in the chamber. When asked why, she said it was the only courteous thing to do considering the alternatives.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., holds the copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address she tore up after he delivered it to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. At left is Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The White House later blasted Pelosi and said she will be remembered for disrespecting every single special guest invited by the president.

Her actions during the speech have attracted attention from both sides of the aisle. Some on the right called for her to be censured and stripped of her gavel.

“I can say the dark cloud is hanging over the Democratic Party in the House, who are sitting on their hands when the president’s talking about American exceptionalism,” said Rep. Chip Roy. “I think it was made very clear when you saw the Speaker of the House tearing up the speech at the dais here afterwards.”

Despite Pelosi’s actions, the president is likely to be acquitted by the Senate in the impeachment trial.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., waits before President Donald Trump arrives to deliver his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Original Article

House Speaker Pelosi chastises President Trump’s impeachment defense team

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives as defense arguments by the Republicans resume in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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UPDATED 10:36 AM PT — Friday, January 31, 2020

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested President Trump’s legal team should be disbarred. While speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday, she claimed the president’s defense is trying to undermine the Constitution by saying the president can do anything that benefits his reelection.

The California Democrat also said she doesn’t know how the defense could make such statements and retain their status as an attorney.

Pelosi went on to address the possibility of an acquittal in the impeachment trial. She made the following statement in regards to this possibility:

“Well, he will not be acquitted. You cannot be acquitted if you don’t have a trial, and you don’t have a trial if you don’t have witnesses and documentation and that. I would hope that the senators, if it comes to a tie or if there is a question of hearing testimony or receiving documents, would leave it up to the chief justice of the Supreme Court…”

The House speaker also went on to claim President Trump does not know right from wrong, and said she is praying that senators will have the courage to handle the truth and call for witness testimony.

RELATED: President Trump criticizes Pelosi and House Democrats over impeachment, Iran

Original Article

Trump accuses Pelosi of ‘crying for fairness’ in Senate trial after ‘unfair’ House impeachment

closeSen. Mitch McConnell calls Nancy Pelosi's decision to withhold articles of impeachment an 'absurd position'Video

Sen. Mitch McConnell calls Nancy Pelosi's decision to withhold articles of impeachment an 'absurd position'

Speaker Pelosi seems to think she can dictate the rules of a Senate impeachment trial, says Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

President Trump slammed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Monday for making demands of the Senate regarding his upcoming trial as she sits on two impeachment articles, accusing her of "crying for fairness" after leading an "unfair" process in the House.

Throughout the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry, Trump and fellow Republicans criticized elements of the process — including the initial closed-door sessions with witnesses, an invitation for him to participate in a hearing while he was overseas, and the decision to cite the president's assertion of executive privilege as evidence of obstruction as opposed to battling it out in court.

MCCONNELL RIPS PELOSI FOR IMPEACHMENT DELAY, SAYS DEMS 'AFRAID' TO TRANSMIT 'SHODDY' ARTICLES

"Pelosi gives us the most unfair trial in the history of the U.S. Congress, and now she is crying for fairness in the Senate, and breaking all rules while doing so," Trump tweeted Monday morning. "She lost Congress once, she will do it again!"

Both chambers of Congress are engaged in an unusual battle over the next steps in the historic process after the House accused Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress for his actions concerning Ukraine, in the third-ever impeachment of an American president.

Pelosi is now indicating she will not turn over the articles of impeachment to the Senate or name impeachment managers until the upper chamber announces the process of how the trial will be conducted.

Coinciding with that position, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has demanded that the Senate be allowed to subpoena documents and witnesses who did not appear before the House. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., responded by saying that the Senate's role is not to do what the House failed to do during what he has called "the most rushed, least thorough, and most unfair impeachment inquiry in modern history."

PELOSI STANDS BY DELAY IN SENDING IMPEACHMENT ARTICLES TO SENATE, CALLS MCCONNELL A 'ROGUE LEADER'

Pelosi fired back Monday morning, tweeting: "The House cannot choose our impeachment managers until we know what sort of trial the Senate will conduct. President Trump blocked his own witnesses and documents from the House, and from the American people, on phony complaints about the House process. What is his excuse now?"

Pelosi has also faced criticism for pushing House Democrats to pursue articles of impeachment on a tight timetable, only to drop that sense of urgency after the final vote. McConnell has accused her and fellow Democrats of getting "cold feet."

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., defended Pelosi on "Fox News Sunday," noting that President Bill Clinton was impeached in mid-December and managers were not appointed until Jan. 6 of the following year after the House returned from the holiday break. She suggested that the current process would not move any faster, even if Pelosi took swift action.

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Earlier on the show, Marc Short, chief of staff for Vice President Pence, claimed that Pelosi would ultimately move forward and allow the Senate to conduct a trial.

"She will yield, there's no way she can hold this position," he predicted.

Original Article

Pence chief of staff not worried about Pelosi impeachment tactics: ‘She will yield’

closeMarc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol HillVideo

Marc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol Hill

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, showed confidence in the face of the current impeachment strategy being employed by House Democrats led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, stating that, ultimately, he believes they will be the first ones to budge and move what he called a "political exercise" closer to its conclusion.

Pelosi and most of the other Democrats in the House approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump last week for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, yet they have sat on those articles instead of delivering them to the Senate for a trial. Pelosi has claimed that she is waiting for the Republican-controlled Senate to set the process for the trial before she appoints impeachment managers. Meanwhile, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., pushes for the ability to issue subpoenas for additional witnesses and documents.

TRUMP BLASTS HOUSE DEMOCRATS OVER IMPEACHMENT: 'THEY HAD NOTHING, THERE'S NO CRIME'

"I think her position is really untenable," Short told "Fox News Sunday," later predicting, "She will yield, there's no way she can hold this position."

Short also questioned why Democrats feel the need to include additional witnesses in the first place, given the swift and decisive nature of the impeachment itself.

"If her case is so airtight that she said, that she had to ram it through and it's undeniable, why does she need more witnesses to make her case?" he asked.

Ultimately, Short said he thinks the impeachment is "a political exercise to placate the radical left of their base," and that it is "going nowhere."

JEFF FLAKE CLAIMS SENATE REPUBLICANS, NOT JUST TRUMP, ARE ON TRIAL

Later in the program, Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., addressed the delay in the delivery of the articles of impeachment, claiming that while she does not know what the House's time frame will be, the present timeline is nothing out of the ordinary.

She pointed out that President Bill Clinton was impeached on Dec. 19, and the House did not appoint their managers until Jan. 6, after Congress returned from the holiday break. She does not believe the current Senate would move any faster, regardless of how quickly the House moved.

"Did you really think the United States Senate was going to start this trial before January 6?" she asked.

Host Chris Wallace pointed out that Pelosi is hoping to use her delay to give Shumer leverage in his discussions with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who has accused Pelosi of having "cold feet."

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Dingell responded to that by criticizing McConnell, who has stated that he is "not an impartial juror."

"I don't call that a fair and impartial hearing," she said.

Original Article

Pelosi, days after impeaching president, invites Trump to deliver State of the Union address

closeImpeachment stalls as Nancy Pelosi pushes proceedings into the new yearVideo

Impeachment stalls as Nancy Pelosi pushes proceedings into the new year

Sen. Chuck Schumer says he and Nancy Pelosi are on the same page as the two top Democrats in Congress try to put pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell; chief congressional correspondent Mike Emanuel reports from Capitol Hill.

House Speaker Nancy Pelsoi Friday formally invited President Trump to give his 2020 State of the Union address before the U.S. House, just two days after the majority of Congress voted to impeach him.

In a letter to Trump, Pelosi cited the constitutional obligation to invite the president to speak “from time to time.”

“In the spirit of respecting our Constitution, I invite you to deliver your State of the Union address before a Joint Session of Congress on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 in the Chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives," Pelosi wrote.

MCCONNELL: 'IMPASSE' OVER TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, AS DEMS DEPART FROM PRECEDENT

The White House on Friday released a statement saying, "President Donald J. Trump has accepted the Speaker’s invitation to deliver the State of the Union Address on February 4, 2020."

The Feb. 4 address could come in the midst of a Senate trial if Pelosi sends over the two articles of impeachment House Democrats approved Wednesday. And Trump’s speech would happen at the height of the 2020 election campaign, with the Iowa caucuses scheduled a day prior.

During the 1999 State of the Union address given by then-President Bill Clinton, he did not mention the then-occurring impeachment trial in the Senate. Several Republican House members boycotted the 77-minute speech to show their displeasure with Clinton. Some Democrats, including Sens. Dianne Feinstein of California and Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, joined Republicans in urging Clinton to delay the address.

It wasn’t impeachment, but there was high-drama for Trump's last State of the Union. His planned January address before the newly-elected Democratic House majority was delayed because a record-long government shutdown that had Trump and Pelosi in a political standoff.

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Once the government reopened, Trump gave his speech on Feb. 5, 2019, at Pelosi's invitation.

Fox News' Jon Decker contributed to this report.

Original Article

Pelosi’s problem: Dems’ own witness says Trump not truly impeached unless articles go to Senate

closeCongress leaves for Christmas break without sending articles of impeachment to the SenateVideo

Congress leaves for Christmas break without sending articles of impeachment to the Senate

Pelosi thanks Democrats for 'moral courage.' Fox News correspondent Todd Piro reports.

Consider it a twist on the old question about a tree falling in the forest with no one to hear it: If the House adopts articles of impeachment but never sends them to the Senate, is a president truly impeached?

A Harvard law professor, who also served as a Democrat-called impeachment witness, answered with a resounding “no” in a column that speaks to the deep dilemma House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faces as she sits on two articles of impeachment against President Trump.

MCCONNELL: 'IMPASSE' OVER TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, AS DEMS DEPART FROM PRECEDENT

Pelosi, D-Calif., is apparently using the delay as leverage to extract favorable terms for a Senate trial. But Noah Feldman wrote for Bloomberg that an “indefinite delay” would pose a “serious problem”—as impeachment only technically happens when the articles are transmitted to the Senate.

“Both parts are necessary to make an impeachment under the Constitution: The House must actually send the articles and send managers to the Senate to prosecute the impeachment. And the Senate must actually hold a trial,” Feldman wrote.

“If the House does not communicate its impeachment to the Senate, it hasn’t actually impeached the president,” he continued. “If the articles are not transmitted, Trump could legitimately say he wasn’t truly impeached at all.”

Pelosi signaled late Wednesday after the House passed articles of impeachment—on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress—that she wanted reassurances that the Senate would hold a fair trial, likely involving certain Democrat-sought witnesses, before sending over the articles.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on the floor Thursday seemed baffled at Pelosi’s move to withhold the articles, arguing that the House speaker doesn’t have the leverage she thinks she does.

“Some House Democrats imply they are withholding the articles for some kind of leverage,” McConnell said. “I admit, I’m not sure what leverage there is in refraining from sending us something we do not want. Alas, if they can figure that out, they can explain.”

He added: “Following weeks of pronouncements about the urgency of the situation, urgent situation, the prosecutors appear to have developed cold feet. Democrat prosecution seems to have gotten cold feet and be unsure about whether they want to proceed to the trial. Like I said, a very unusual spectacle, and in my view, certainly not one that reflects well on the House.”

President Trump takes aim at House Speaker Pelosi for not sending articles of impeachment to the SenateVideo

“So, we’ll see whether House Democrats ever want to work up the courage to actually take their accusation to trial,” McConnell said.

Despite McConnell saying the Senate doesn’t actually “want” to receive the articles, President Trump has called for an immediate trial and is evidently looking for his day in court to be acquitted for the alleged crimes surrounding his efforts to pressure Ukraine to launch politically advantageous investigations. The request came after the administration had withheld millions in military aid to Ukraine, though Trump has denied any quid pro quo was at play.

“I got Impeached last night without one Republican vote being cast with the Do Nothing Dems on their continuation of the greatest Witch Hunt in American history,” Trump tweeted Thursday. “Now the Do Nothing Party want to Do Nothing with the Articles & not deliver them to the Senate, but it’s the Senate’s call!”

Meanwhile, another Harvard law professor, Laurence Tribe, has defended Pelosi.

"Senate rules requiring the House to 'immediately' present its articles of impeachment to the Senate clearly violate the constitutional clause in Article I giving each house the sole power to make its own rules," Tribe tweeted on Wednesday.

"It’s up to the House when and how to prosecute its case in the Senate," he added, just hours before House Democrats voted to approve the two articles of impeachment.

Before Wednesday's vote, Tribe penned a Washington Post op-ed calling on the House not to let Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., hold a "Potemkin trial."

"This option needs to be taken seriously now that Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has announced his intention to conduct not a real trial but a whitewash, letting the president and his legal team call the shots," Tribe wrote.

HARVARD LAW PROFESSOR BACKS PELOSI MOVE TO KEEP ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT FROM SENATE

Tribe's op-ed added that the House didn't need a constitutional provision allowing it to withhold the articles from the Senate.

Pelosi, for her part, made clear earlier this week that she's concerned with how McConnell would arrange a trial in the GOP-led Senate.

"Let me tell you what I don't consider a fair trial," she told reporters. "This is what I don't consider a fair trial — that Leader McConnell has stated that he's not an impartial juror, that he's going to take his cues, in quotes, from the White House, and he is working in total coordination with the White House counsel's office."

But with the trial schedule thrown into doubt as Congress breaks for the holidays absent an agreement, Feldman's op-ed suggests that time is not on Pelosi's side.

"[I]f the House never sends the articles, then Trump could say with strong justification that he was never actually impeached. And that’s probably not the message Congressional Democrats are hoping to send," he wrote.

Fox News’ Sam Dorman and Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Original Article

McCarthy mocks Pelosi for shooting down impeachment questions from reporters

closeRep McCarthy: Pelosi admitting failure by not sending impeachment articlesVideo

Rep McCarthy: Pelosi admitting failure by not sending impeachment articles

Kevin McCarthy says Speaker Pelosi is admitting defeat by not sending articles of impeachment to the Senate

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., mocked Speaker Nancy Pelosi for holding a press conference the day after President Trump's impeachment, only to refuse to take questions on the matter.

During a press conference of his own on Thursday, McCarthy was asked whether he took the impeachment as a defeat. After declaring it "a defeat to the Constitution," McCarthy took a jab at the speaker.

PELOSI STANDS BY DELAY IN SENDING IMPEACHMENT ARTICLES TO SENATE, CALLS MCCONNELL A 'ROGUE LEADER'

"The question you probably wanted to ask was to the speaker. Unfortunately, she would not take any questions when it came to impeachment," he said.

Pelosi, D-Calif., did briefly address impeachment during her session with reporters, in a bid to tamp down speculation over why she is holding off on transmitting the two articles of impeachment to the Senate for trial.

But as reporters continued to pepper her with questions on the subject, the speaker responded, "I said what I was going to say." She later asked if anyone had questions about other issues such as the "SALT tax," stating, "I'm not going to answer any more questions on this."

McCarthy minutes later torched Pelosi for shutting down impeachment-related questions.

"I would think if Nancy Pelosi thought impeachment was so important that she had to put this before the American public … the press conference the day after impeachment — that she has weekly — I thought she would have welcomed questions about impeachment," McCarthy said. "Unfortunately, she told you they were Republican talking points and she would not take your questions. I never thought a speaker would act that way."

Pelosi says she has a spring in her step after House impeaches TrumpVideo

McCarthy hypothesized why Pelosi did not want to address the issue.

"I guess, the only thing I could take from that is she’s embarrassed of it, she understands how weak it is, she understands her own criteria was not met, constitutionally it was not met, she probably failed on all parts," he said.

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White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham also slammed Pelosi for her press conference.

Pelosi, though, did respond to speculation and criticism from Republicans that Democrats are playing games with the impeachment process.

"Frankly, I don't care what the Republicans say," she said.

Regarding the delay, Pelosi signaled the House will wait to learn more about the Senate trial process before naming so-called impeachment managers — who essentially serve as prosecutors in a trial. If that moves forward, Trump would be expected to win acquittal in the GOP-controlled Senate.

Trump was impeached on two articles alleging abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, related to his efforts over the summer to press Ukraine into investigating Democrats — all while U.S. aid money was withheld.

Original Article

Pelosi stands by delay in sending impeachment articles to Senate, calls McConnell a ‘rogue leader’

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday defended her decision to hold off on sending impeachment articles to the Senate, calling Mitch McConnell a "rogue leader" in an unusual press conference where she repeatedly tried to shut down questions about the impeachment process.

Pelosi spoke to reporters after Democrats passed two articles of impeachment against President Trump in a Wednesday evening vote. She indicated the House would eventually send the articles over to the upper chamber, but insisted it is up to the Senate to determine how the process develops going forward.

“The next thing for us will be when we see the process that is set forth in the Senate, then we’ll know the number of managers that we may have to go forward, and who we would choose,” Pelosi said during a Thursday morning press conference.

After an impeachment in the House, the articles are normally sent over to the upper chamber for an impeachment trial, but Pelosi signaled earlier that the House is waiting for the Senate to set out how Trump's trial will be conducted before they determine their next steps, such as designating impeachment managers who will represent them.

Earlier Thursday morning, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Democrats may be “too afraid” to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate after the House speaker abruptly held off on transmitting them.

"Looks like the prosecutors are getting cold feet," the Senate GOP leader mused.

McConnell also criticized the impeachment in remarks on the Senate floor, calling it “a rushed and rigged inquiry.”

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On Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., had requested that the Senate issue subpoenas for documents and witnesses who had not testified during the House's impeachment inquiry. McConnell responded by stating that the House should have been more thorough, and it was not the Senate's role to do the House's "homework" for them.

Fox News' Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Original Article

McConnell rips Pelosi for impeachment delay, says Dems ‘afraid’ to transmit ‘shoddy’ articles

closeMitch McConnell: Dems setting 'toxic precedent' with predetermined partisan outcomeVideo

Mitch McConnell: Dems setting 'toxic precedent' with predetermined partisan outcome

Speaking on impeachment, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says House Democrats are conducting "most unfair impeachment inquiry in modern history."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell set the stage Thursday for a potentially bruising fight between the leadership of the two chambers over impeachment, as he tore into Nancy Pelosi for “shoddy work” and said Democrats may be “too afraid” to send the articles to the Senate after the House speaker abruptly held off on transmitting them.

“This particular House of Representatives has let its partisan rage at this particular president create a toxic new precedent that will echo well into the future,” McConnell said on the floor, accusing Democrats of giving into "temptation" with their impeachment vote while challenging their handling of the articles in the aftermath.

McConnell’s remarks came the morning after House Democrats voted to impeach President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in relation to his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

HOUSE IMPEACHES TRUMP OVER UKRAINE DEALINGS, AS PELOSI FLOATS HOLDING UP SENATE TRIAL

McConnell decried the effort, for which no Republicans voted, as “the most rushed, least thorough, and most unfair impeachment inquiry in modern history.” It taps into long-standing complaints by Republicans that the impeachment has trampled over minority rights in the House, and that Democrats were pursuing an outcome they have preordained before Trump was even sworn into office.

After an impeachment in the House, the articles are normally sent over to the upper chamber for an impeachment trial. Yet in the latest twist, Pelosi has indicated that she may not send over articles of impeachment yet — until she gets reassurances about the Senate process.

"We’ll make a decision… as we go along." Pelosi told reporters, adding that "we'll see what the process will be on the Senate side."

"We have acted," Pelosi continued, repeatedly refusing to commit to sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate. "Now, they'll understand what their responsibilities are, and we'll see what that is.”

Pelosi insisted that Republicans would need to run a fair trial if the matter made its way to the Senate, without explaining what exactly she was seeking.

Pelosi hints she may delay sending impeachment articles to SenateVideo

While the move could be a way of trying to draw some concessions from McConnell, it may also be a play stop a potentially damaging Senate trial altogether, in which the Republican-dominated chamber could call witnesses such as former Vice President Joe Biden, his son Hunter, and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif.

It would also leave Trump with an awkward status quo in which he is impeached, but cannot claim exoneration in a Senate trial — in which he would be widely expected to win acquittal. However, it also risks dragging impeachment out deep into 2020, just as some polls indicate the public is souring on the process.

GABBARD STUNS BY VOTING 'PRESENT' ON IMPEACHMENT, SLAMS PARTISAN SHAM

McConnell accused Pelosi of suggesting “that House Democrats may be too afraid to even transmit their shoddy work product to the Senate.”

McConnell is expected to meet with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., but any delay in the House could lead to McConnell refusing to meet with Schumer, giving the excuse that there are no articles for them yet to discuss since they have not been transmitted.

Trump, meanwhile, attacked the “do nothing Democrats” for wanting to “do nothing” with the impeachment articles.

“I got Impeached last night without one Republican vote being cast with the Do Nothing Dems on their continuation of the greatest Witch Hunt in American history,” he tweeted. “Now the Do Nothing Party want to Do Nothing with the Articles & not deliver them to the Senate, but it’s Senate’s call!”

“The Senate shall set the time and place of the trial.” If the Do Nothing Democrats decide, in their great wisdom, not to show up, they would lose by Default!” he added.

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In his remarks, McConnell said that the Senate’s duty is to rise to the occasion on matters as grave as impeachment and to give the nation some stability.

“The framers built the Senate to provide stability… To keep partisan passions from boiling over,” he said. “Moments like this are why the United States Senate exists.”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram, Brooke Singman and Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Original Article

Pelosi suggests she may wait to send impeachment articles to Senate: ‘We’ll make a decision … as we go along’

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 18

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 18 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Democrats may wait to send their articles of impeachment against President Trump to the GOP-controlled Senate, for fear that they are incapable of holding a fair trial.

Pelosi held a press conference on Wednesday following the House impeachment vote and was asked what would qualify as a "fair trial."

"We'll make a decision as a group, as we always have, as we go along," she replied.

Pelosi was then asked about possibly withholding the articles of impeachment from the Senate until they get certain reassurances, and the Speaker refused to give a direct answer.

"Again, we'll decide what that dynamic is, but we hope that the resolution of that process will be soon in the Senate," she said.

GOHMERT SHOUTS AT NADLER ON HOUSE FLOOR AFTER 'RUSSIAN PROPAGANDA' ACCUSATION

Pelosi proceeded to read a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., about impeachment procedure and used it as an example of what she considers to be an unfair process.

"Let me tell you what I don't consider a fair trial," she told the crowd of reporters. "This is what I don't consider a fair trial — that Leader McConnell has stated that he's not an impartial juror, that he's going to take his cues, in quotes, from the White House, and he is working in total coordination with the White House counsel's office."

She finally deferred to the Senate as the final arbiter of Trump's fate and accused the president of withholding vital documents from Congress.

"It's up to the senators to make their own decision working together, hopefully in recognition of their witnesses that the president withheld from us, their documents that the president withheld from us and we would hope that that information would be available in a trial to go to the next step. Because that's another level in terms of conviction, in terms of this," Pelosi said. "But right now the president is impeached."

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The Speaker then repeatedly fended off questions about withholding the articles, before saying it would ultimately be a joint decision between the House and Senate.

"We will make our decision as to when we're going to send — when we see what they're doing on the Senate side, but that's a decision that we will make jointly," she said.

The impeachment vote total on the abuse-of-power count was 230–197, with Hawaii Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard voting present. The obstruction vote total was 229–198, with Gabbard also voting present on that count too.

Original Article

Pelosi, AOC among Dem congresswomen wearing dark colors for ‘somber’ impeachment vote

closePelosi opens debate on Trump impeachment: 'He gave us no choice'Video

Pelosi opens debate on Trump impeachment: 'He gave us no choice'

House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi delivers an opening statement to the House floor debate on two articles of impeachment against President Trump, calling the president an 'ongoing threat' to national security and the integrity of elections.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and other Democratic female lawmakers appeared to send a message by wearing black and other dark colors on the day that House Democrats planned on exercising what the Speaker described as Congress' "solemn" impeachment power against President Trump.

Pelosi, along with Democrat Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez from New York, Donna Shalala from Florida, Robin Kelly from Illinois and Suzanne Bonamici from Oregon all wore black outfits that resembled funeral attire. On top of Pelosi's black dress was a golden pin of the Mace of the Republic — a symbol of the House of Representatives' authority.

Speaking from the House floor on Wednesday, Pelosi declared that Trump violated the Constitution.

"That is why today as speaker of the House, I solemnly and sadly open the debate on the impeachment of the president of the United States," she said.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump is on the cusp of being impeached by the House, with a historic debate set Wednesday on charges that he abused his power and obstructed Congress ahead of votes that will leave a defining mark on his tenure at the White House. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump is on the cusp of being impeached by the House, with a historic debate set Wednesday on charges that he abused his power and obstructed Congress ahead of votes that will leave a defining mark on his tenure at the White House. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds hands with Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., as they walk to the chamber where the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives begins a day of debate on the impeachments charges against President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds hands with Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., as they walk to the chamber where the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives begins a day of debate on the impeachments charges against President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The apparent gesture came as House Democrats prepared to formally exercise one of their most contentious powers outlined in the Constitution. After a months-long impeachment inquiry, members of Congress debated two articles of impeachment on the House floor. While Democrats are expected to approve the impeachment articles along partisan lines, Republican senate leadership has already indicated it would reject any subsequent attempt to remove Trump from office.

WHY ARE WOMEN WEARING WHITE TO THE STATE OF THE UNION? DEMOCRATIC LAWMAKERS AIM TO SEND 'LOUD AND CLEAR' MESSAGE

Neither Pelosi's nor Ocasio-Cortez's offices immediately responded to Fox News' requests for comment.

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., confirmed to Fox News that members wore dark colors to mark the tone of impeachment.

“It was informal,” Dingell told Fox News of the coordination. “It’s a somber day.”

Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, D-Pa., wore a dark navy pants suit with pinstripes. “I actually was curious whether there was going to be a dress code, but not that I’m aware of,” she told Fox News. She said she chose a dark suit for the significant occasion. “It was not a day for partisan colors or celebration. So I think a lot of us felt like it was a day for sober attire," she said.

One of Pelosi's colleagues also told CNN that several female Democrats intentionally wore all black in order to gesture that the day of the impeachment vote was a somber one.

Coordinating outfits wouldn't be out of character for House Democrats.

Rep. Robin Kelly, D-Ill., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)

Rep. Robin Kelly, D-Ill., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)

During Trump's State of the Union address in February, dozens of members wore white to support women's suffrage and protest the administration's alleged attempts to roll back progress for women.

Pelosi and other Democrats previously claimed they didn't enjoy impeaching the president — a claim that conservatives derided as ridiculous.

LIBERAL 'VIEW' HOSTS SAY TRUMP'S LETTER TO PELOSI SHOWS HE'S FRIGHTENED, UNSTABLE

Former White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted that Pelosi felt sad because impeachment would ultimately help Trump win reelection.

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"Nancy Pelosi 'feels sad' about impeachment only because she knows this Democrat scam is a generous in-kind contribution to President Trump and every Republican running against a Democrat in a Trump district," the Fox News contributor tweeted. "Too bad she’s too weak to stand up to the angry liberals in her party."

Original Article

Trump tells Pelosi in blistering letter that Dems have ‘cheapened the importance’ of impeachment

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Rep. Jim Banks: 'Shame on Speaker Pelosi' for politicizing impeachment and USMCA

Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN) shares his reaction to the House Judiciary Committee issuing two articles of impeachment against President Trump for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress. He also weighs in on the GOP's biggest takeaways from the impeachment inquiry.

President Trump, in a blistering letter Tuesday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., lambasted the Democrats' impeachment inquiry, writing, "you have cheapened the importance of the very ugly word, impeachment!"

This is a developing story; check back for updates.

Original Article

Trump takes nasty dig at Pelosi in latest slam of House Dems

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Eric Shawn: President Trump's impeachment edge

Judy Miller on the unexpected political impact of the proceedings.

President Trump on Sunday took a swipe at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., over her response to a reporter who asked why bribery wasn’t included in the newly unveiled articles of impeachment, despite Democrats – including the speaker herself – having leveled those charges repeatedly against the president throughout impeachment proceedings.

“You yourself accused [Trump] of bribery,” the reporter asked.

“Why did you decide not to make bribery one of the articles of impeachment?”

Pelosi said the decision not to include bribery in the articles of impeachment against Trump came after “working together with our committee chairs, our attorneys and the rest.”

In a retweet of Pelosi’s response, Trump wrote that the House speaker’s teeth “were falling out of her mouth, and she didn’t have time to think!”

He then followed up the tweet by writing that “Congressional Do Nothing Democrats are being absolutely decimated in their districts on the subject of the Impeachment Hoax.”

“Crazy Nancy is finding defending Shifty Schiff harder than she thought!” he tweeted, in reference to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., one of the most visible figures of the impeachment inquiry.

Pelosi did not immediately respond.

NADLER BRUSHES OFF VAN DREW'S PLANNED JUMP TO GOP, SAYS HE'S 'REACTING' TO POOR POLL NUMBERS

Democrats repeatedly have accused Trump of withholding military aid from Ukraine until it investigated former Vice President Joe Biden and his son. Trump and the White House have denied he did anything wrong.

After witness testimony last month, Pelosi lobbed the bribery accusation against Trump.

“Bribery—and that is in the Constitution and attached to impeachment proceedings,” Pelosi said. “The bribe is to grant or withhold military assistance in return for a public statement of a fake investigation into the election—that’s bribery.”

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When asked at the time whether bribery would be included as an article of impeachment, she replied: “We haven’t even made a decision to impeach. That’s what the inquiry is about.”

“I’m saying, [what] the president has admitted to as ‘perfect,’ is bribery,” Pelosi said.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Original Article

Trump slams Pelosi, says Dems using impeachment for ‘political gain’ after Judiciary vote

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Trump: Pelosi started impeachment hoax two years before Ukraine

President Trump points out Nancy Pelosi slipped up when she admitted democrats started impeachment two-years before the Ukraine phone call

President Trump called Speaker Nancy Pelosi a "liar" and accused Democrats of trivializing an impeachment process that should only be used "in an emergency," in his first comments after House Democrats advanced articles of impeachment against him.

"It's a scam. It's something that shouldn't be allowed," Trump said in the Oval Office Friday. "And it's a very bad thing for our country and you're trivializing impeachment. And I tell you what, someday there will be a Democrat president, and there will be a Republican House."

"And I suspect they're going to remember it," he said. "Because [that's what happens] when you use impeachment for absolutely nothing other than to try and get political gain."

JUDICIARY COMMITTEE APPROVES ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT AGAINST TRUMP, AS GOP SLAMS ‘KANGAROO COURT’

Trump insisted he did nothing wrong and blamed the impeachment "hoax" on Democrats looking for any reason to try to oust him from office.

He pointed to Pelosi's recent interview at Politico’s Women Rule Summit, where she pushed back on criticism that the impeachment process was moving too quickly.

“It’s been going on for 22 months. Two and a half years, actually,” Pelosi said.

Republicans have pounced on those comments as evidence Pelosi and House leadership have been plotting impeachment since Trump was elected and were just waiting for another controversy to pounce.

"It showed she's a liar," Trump said of the comments, saying Pelosi got "duped."

"It's a very sad thing for our country but it seems to be very good for me politically … The polls have gone through the roof for Trump."

He continued: "The impeachment is a hoax. It's a sham. It started a long time ago — probably before I came down the escalator with the future first lady."

UNDER-SIEGE DEMS IN TRUMP DISTRICTS KEEP IMPEACHMENT DECISION CLOSE TO THE VEST

Trump’s comments come shortly after the House Judiciary Committee approved two articles of impeachment against him for abuse of power and obstructing Congress in a party-line vote. The full House will vote as early as Wednesday on whether to impeach the president.

Democrats allege that Trump violated his oath of office by pressuring the president of Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election when he requested investigations into his political rival Joe Biden and son, Hunter. Trump asked Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky for the investigations in a phone call on July 25 – as the White House put a hold on nearly $400 million in aid.

Trump insists the call was “perfect” and House Republicans have slammed Democrats for trying to overturn the results of the 2016 election for conduct that doesn’t warrant impeachment.

The House Rules Committee will meet on Tuesday to set up the terms of the impeachment floor debate likely for the following day. Pelosi needs 216 votes — assuming all members are present and voting — to impeach Trump. That would set up a trial in the Senate, where Trump is expected to be acquitted.

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Long before the Ukraine controversy came to light, Pelosi said she wasn’t in favor of impeaching Trump because it would be too rancorous for the country.

“Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,” Pelosi told The Washington Post Magazine in March. “And he’s just not worth it.”

But those remarks were in reference to allegations Trump colluded with Russia in the 2016 presidential race. Pelosi got on board with impeachment on the narrower issue of Ukraine.

Trump made his impeachment remarks during an Oval Office meeting with Paraguay President Mario Abdo Benítez, just as he was finishing up a trade deal with China.

“It’s been a wild week,” Trump said.

Original Article

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez plans to vote against Pelosi drug pricing bill without changes

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 11

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D. N.Y., said Tuesday she plans to vote against a bill put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that would allow the government to negotiate lower prices on prescription drugs.

Ocasio-Cortez and other liberal lawmakers have been urging Pelosi for months to make the bill more progressive and have threatened to delay the bill without the changes, including making negotiated drug prices available to those without insurance, Politico reported.

AOC INVOKES DOG BREEDING PRACTICES IN DEBATE ABOUT PAID FAMILY LEAVE

“As the bill stands, she plans on voting no,” an Ocasio-Cortez spokesperson said, according to CNBC.

The House is expected to vote on the bill this week.

“Make my day,” moderate Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-Ore., said over the potential delay, according to Politico. “I think the speaker understands the politics better than some of our progressive colleagues.”

House leaders have resisted the changes over fears of losing moderates, especially in vulnerable districts critical to keeping a Democratic majority, Politico reported.

Mitch McConnell likely won’t take up the bill in the Senate and President Trump has planned to veto it if it passes through Congress.

In a statement, Trump said the bill would “likely undermine access to lifesaving medicines.”

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The Congressional Budget Office said the bill likely would save Medicare $345 billion over a decade, CNBC reported.

Original Article

Pelosi, progressive caucus clash over drug pricing legislation

closePresident Trump says his new transparency plan will bring down health care costsVideo

President Trump says his new transparency plan will bring down health care costs

The Trump administration says forcing hospitals and insurance companies to disclose, up front, the full cost of all medical treatment will bring prices down by helping people shop for better deals; critics say studies show most Americans will skip or delay medical treatment if they know it's going to cost them a lot of money.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is facing intraparty opposition ahead of a vote on drug pricing legislation that progressives have complained doesn't go far enough in regulating costs for Americans.

The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) — along with progressive Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. — pushed for more aggressive cost control.

According to Politico, CPC co-chairs Pramila Jayapal, D-Wa., and Mark Pocan, D-Wis., have privately said they had enough votes to reject the bill.

DR. MATTHEW STRYKER: WHO PROFITS FROM DRUG PRICE DECREASES?

While the bill likely won't gain traction in the GOP-led Senate, it could serve as an opportunity for Democrats to advance a drug pricing plan as the administration advocated its own.

The Democrats' legislation would focus on allowing Medicare to negotiate lower prices on the most expensive drugs. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the plan would save the agency $345 billion over a decade.

But according to the White House, it would block 100 drugs from reaching the market by threatening a 95 percent excise tax on sales of drugs that don't abide by Health and Human Services' pricing. Pelosi's plan would presumably have a more wide-reaching impact in that it would make negotiated drug prices available to everyone — not just those with Medicare.

If progressives shoot down the legislation, it would likely feed the White House's narrative that progressives are thwarting the will of the leadership. "Is anyone surprised their socialist 2020 candidates want to drive their party even further left?" Republican National Committee (RNC) spokesman Michael Joyce told Fox News.

TRUMP LOOKS TO CANADA TO HELP LOWER US PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICES

On Monday, Pelosi reportedly called the potential insurrection a "bad idea." She's currently leading her caucus in what appears to be a united front in impeaching President Trump. A progressive revolt could disrupt that unified image as Democrats head into the 2020 primary season. Leading candidates have promised bold reform like "Medicare-for-all," a prospect that could look even less likely if House Democrats are unable to compromise on drug pricing.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., an icon of the House's progressive wing, will likely oppose the legislation. “They stripped out everything that looked like progress,” spokesperson Corbin Trent said, according to The Intercept. Jayapal, in particular, has pushed for cost controls that would block price hikes beyond the rate of inflation.

Ocasio-Cortez previously clashed with leadership over a bipartisan bill funding immigration enforcement agencies during the migrant crisis. Pelosi has also indicated that the New York congresswoman wouldn't get leadership's support while pushing her signature Green New Deal. She's also said she's "not a big fan of Medicare-for-all," a policy favored by Jayapal, Warren, Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez.

Pelosi's office has described the bill — titled the "Lower Drug Costs Now Act" — as "bold action to level the playing field for American patients and taxpayers."

But according to the right-leaning Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), the plan would result in shortages and hurt new research and development.

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"Exorbitant healthcare costs are a direct product of decades of increasing government interference in the marketplace," CEI research fellow Patrick Hedger said in a statement to Fox News. "Ratcheting-up this interference, particularly with simplistic price controls, has predictable and undesirable results.”

On Monday, House Republicans introduced an alternative for drug pricing — the "Lower Costs, More Cures Act" — that would limit annual out-of-pocket costs for Medicare beneficiaries, among other things.

Original Article