DNC Chairman: Democrat Brand Is Broken

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DNC Chairman: Democrat Brand Is Broken jamie harrison speaks into mic Democrat Senate candidate Jamie Harrison speaks at a watch party after losing the Senate race in Columbia, S. C. Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. (Richard Shiro/AP Images)

By Charlie McCarthy | Monday, 05 April 2021 10:09 AM

The Democrat brand is broken and needs to be repaired, according to the Democratic National Committee chairman.

"It's not even just with Republicans," DNC Chairman Jaime Harrison told The Daily Beast's podcast The New Abnormal. "The Democrat brand with some of the folks who are core at the base of our party is not the greatest.

"And so I want to spend a lot of time, energy, and effort understanding why the brand is where it is, what it is and how, and what we can do in order to improve it."

Harrison, who took his position on Jan. 21, lost his bid for a Senate seat to incumbant Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., in November's election. He told the podcast how he dealt with a "tarnished" Democrat brand in South Carolina.

"I experienced it on my own race, Lindsey [Graham] and his crew of dark money effectively labeled me as somebody who believed in defunding the police," Harrison said, according to The Hill. "My grandfather on my stepfather's side was in the Detroit police department for 40 years. So I don’t believe in that.

"But they were able to do it because the Democratic brand had been so tarnished in South Carolina that people would believe anything. If they said, 'Jaime kicked a puppy the other day,' they would have believed it."

With President Joe Biden and Congressional Democrats having passed a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, and now promoting a $2.25 trillion infrastructure plan, Harrison said his party needs to stress its accomplishments, especially in rural areas and red states.

"We have to take credit and claim the things that we will have gotten done over the course of this next two years," Harrison said. "We're going to do a lot for rural America.

"The American Rescue Plan has so much in there for rural communities across this country. And it will have a huge benefit, this infrastructure plan, when we get this done. The broadband component in it alone will totally transform rural America."

Harrison said the Democrat party's message to rural areas will help grow the base, and "persuade a few other folks to take a look at us."

"Those communities are also just as diverse as urban communities. We also need to make sure that we're listening to them," Harrison said. "And then, in the end, we've got to deliver and I believe we can do those things. Not only will we grow our base, but I think we also persuade a few other folks to take a look at us."

Both the DNC and Republican National Committee are gearing up for the 2022 election cycle. Traditionally, the sitting president's party loses seats in midterm elections.

Republicans hope to regain a majority in both the House and Senate. The upper chamber is currently split evenly along party lines, with Vice President Kamala Harris as the tiebreaking vote. Democrats hold a 219-211 edge in the House.

Although it has tended to take a less-active role in midterm elections, the DNC announced a coordinated effort last month to sell President Biden's coronavirus relief package to battleground state voters.

A message guide on how to promote the legislation was sent to Democrat state and national officials.

Original Article

Trump Puts Off Presidential Library

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Trump Puts Off Presidential Library donald trump stands onstage under spotlight Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Mark Niquette and Jennifer Jacobs Monday, 05 April 2021 07:11 AM

Donald Trump is spending his first months as an ex-president trying to ensure that he’s remembered the way he wants — but he’s holding off on plans to establish a library that would enshrine his version of his presidency.

Planning for a library would suggest he’s done being president and that’s not something he’s ready to concede, say people familiar with his thinking. Trump has publicly dangled the possibility that he will seek the Republican nomination in 2024.

“Once he says, ‘I am going to be raising money for my library,’ he’s given up even the pretense of trying to run again,” said Anthony Clark, who has written about the politics and history of presidential libraries.

By delaying a library, Trump puts aside, at least for now, a chance to shape the story of his presidency — as Richard Nixon initially did at his museum by describing the Watergate scandal as a Democrat coup attempt, or as George W. Bush did with a theater that allows participants to vote on the options that he faced such as whether to invade Iraq but ends with a video of Bush explaining his decision.

All presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have pursued a presidential library as a way to archive and house their records for researchers as well as to burnish their legacies. Bill Clinton joked at Bush’s library opening in 2013 that it was the “latest, grandest example of the eternal struggle of former presidents to rewrite history.”

Before Barack Obama, presidents created nonprofit foundations to raise money from private donors to build libraries and museums that they then donated or leased to the federal government to staff and operate using taxpayer funds. The foundations pay for and create the exhibits, with the National Archives helping to develop the content.

Obama is having his private foundation build and administer his presidential center while allowing the National Archives to handle his records. Nixon initially did that as well with the library he opened in 1990 at his birthplace of Yorba Linda, California, before it was turned over to the government to run in 2007.

Clark said he doubts that Trump will ever have a presidential library because of how expensive and complicated they are to build, how difficult it is to secure a location, and because he didn’t start raising money and planning before leaving office as other presidents did.

Obama started his library foundation in 2014 for an expected $500 million presidential center in Chicago, his adopted hometown, but groundbreaking isn’t expected until this year because of delays from federal reviews and litigation.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center, which includes a library with his records, a museum, the Bush policy institute, and the offices of Bush’s foundation, opened on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas — former first lady Laura Bush’s alma mater — in 2013 after finalists for the site were announced in 2005.

The National Archives has already set up a Trump Presidential Library website with information about the former president and first lady Melania Trump, and holds the records of the Trump administration, which will start to become available in 2026 — though Trump can restrict access for 12 years.

While Trump may want the imprimatur of a library run by the federal government, he’d likely follow Obama’s and Nixon’s early model of having the National Archives handle records separately from a museum that he can fully control, said Timothy Naftali, who served as the first director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum after it became part of the federal system and created a new, nonpartisan Watergate gallery.

If Trump built a private library or tourist attraction for his supporters, that would allow him to depict his presidency the way he wants, Naftali said.

“His museum will have the same spirit as the private Nixon library’s museum,” said Naftali, now a presidential scholar and a clinical associate professor at New York University. “His tweets could be used as the banners for various galleries in the museum. It’ll be a center of Trumpism.”

With the delay, Trump is not only letting others write the history of his presidency, he’s giving up one opportunity to deploy his wildly successful fund-raising skills. Trump and his affiliated committees have raised more than $2.3 billion since he began his presidential campaign in 2015.

He told supporters before he left office in January that he wanted to raise $2 billion for a presidential library, according to The Washington Post, which would be the most ever. The most likely vehicle would be a nonprofit charity, the model used by modern presidents, because donations are tax deductible and the entity doesn’t have to pay tax on the money it raises, said Paul Seamus Ryan of the government-accountability group Common Cause.

He could legally accept money in unlimited amounts from sources including foreign countries, and disclosure of the donors’ identities isn’t required except by registered lobbyists who give $200 or more.

Yet such a charity requires that expenditures are used for the public good and not for private benefit of individuals.

Still, a former Nixon library official says that shouldn’t stop Trump from raising money for it.

“Donald Trump proved in 2020 that he had no problems raising money, and he now has four years, if he wants to, to just dangle that prospect of a return to power in front of potential donors,” said Paul Musgrave, a former special assistant to the director at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

Original Article

Biden fails to mention Jesus in ‘Easter Address,’ speaks of COVID

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 2: U.S. President Joe Biden pauses while speaking about the March jobs report in the State Dining Room of the White House on April 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. According to the U.S. Labor Department, employers added over 900,000 jobs in March, up from 416,000 in February. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Joe Biden. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

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UPDATED 6:45 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Joe Biden has come under fire for failing to mention Jesus Christ in his purported ‘Easter Address.’

However, Biden made sure to mention COVID-19 seven times.

“We share the sentiments of Pope Francis who has said that getting vaccinated is a moral obligation,” Biden said.

Biden, who claims to be a devout Catholic, took an opportunity to promote COVID vaccines in his address, which further stirred the latest fears of the coronavirus.

Critics said his address was an insult as he failed to honor the Christian symbol of faith and instead, used a supposedly religious message for political purposes. Biden’s COVID address also caused dismay among Christian communities, many of whom oppose vaccinations for any purpose.

Critics said the focus of Biden’s address showed the modern left was really worshipping money and power instead of Jesus.

MORE NEWS: GOP Senator Blasts Infrastructure Bill For Removing 2017 Tax Cuts

Original Article

AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas ‘Billions of Dollars’

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AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas 'Billions of Dollars' ken paxton stands at a mic with the court in the background Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks outside of the US Supreme Court in 2019.(Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:22 PM

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Sunday President Joe Biden’s open border policies are costing the state “billions of dollars.”

In an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” Paxton said the migrant surge is “a humanitarian disaster and the border towns are suffering more than any others.”

“We have the burdens in our state, we will have to educate them and take care of their health care, we have to figure out their family situation and deal with law enforcement issues,” he said. “It costs the state of Texas billions of dollars.”

“Every time the administration like Obama administration, the Biden administration, opens up the border, it increases our cost,” he added.“We also have the social cost, the crime, increased crime. I wish President [Joe] Biden would talk to the families that have been affected by the crime who have lost loved ones because of immigration. I think it might affect him and give him a different perspective on the downside of the policies that are devastating some of the families in my state.”

Paxton asserted Biden doesn’t have the power to change immigration law.

“He announced for the first 100 days of his administration that you can come across the border and you would not be deported,” he said. “That's not his job to change the law and I think his policies, his announced policies, send the signal to the world, ‘Come across the border and you'll be welcome, you'll be taken care of.’

“I think it's clear that he wants that to happen because he knows from past experience under the Obama administration that if you do that, people will come and it totally worked.”

Paxton also echoed the criticism of Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, of HR1.

“Labeling this the ‘corrupt politicians act’ is absolutely true because it would eliminate voter ID, which we do in our state to verify that you are the right person voting,” he said.

“It would push mail-in ballots which are the highest incidents of voter fraud and allow for felons to votes and would allow for illegals and do everything possible to open up elections so they are not credible anymore,” he continued.

“I think it will ruin the democracy and make our election totally unreliable in every single state instead of just a few,” he said.

But he said it was just one of the measures he is concerned about coming from the Biden administration.

“We are extremely concerned about what this administration is doing even with things like the Keystone pipeline,” he said. “We think they are in a war against fossil fuel and there's no good stated purpose for shutting down the Keystone pipeline… we are losing jobs and we have to ship that through railcar which is not environmentally friendly like pipeline. I have not heard one good reason for shutting down the pipeline.”

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Original Article

Cincy Police Close Street for Suspicious RV Following Nashville Blast

Cincy Police Close Street for Suspicious RV Following Nashville Blast Cincy Police Close Street for Suspicious RV Following Nashville Blast (Dreamstime)

By Brian Trusdell | Friday, 25 December 2020 08:07 PM

Police in Cincinnati closed a downtown street for approximately two and a half hours Friday to investigate a parked recreational vehicle before giving the ''all clear” and reopening the area.

The unusual action came hours after a recreational vehicle exploded in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, Christmas morning after broadcasting alerts for anyone who could hear them to clear the area.

"We take anything like this extremely seriously. We got units here as quickly as possible and cleared all the traffic out of the area,” Cincinnati Police Sgt. Jerry Hodges told the Cincinnati Enquirer. ''I understand people on heightened alert these days," Hodges said. "Everything turned out great."

Police said they were alerted to the RV at about 4:30 p.m. by security and police at the city’s federal building. Using K-9 units, the RV was cleared about 7 p.m. There were conflicting reports — such as one by local CBS/CW affiliate WKRC, which said the RV’s engine was running. Others, such as the Enquirer, said the engine was not running but that an internal generator could be heard starting, apparently to maintain temperature.

The RV was owned by a local man but had out-of-state license plates due to a recent purchase.

"Out of an abundance of caution, based on the incident in Tennessee we are using Explosive Detection K9s to clear the scene," officials told the Enquirer. "At this time there is nothing else indicating there is anything else of a suspicious nature."