Pence chief of staff not worried about Pelosi impeachment tactics: ‘She will yield’

closeMarc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol HillVideo

Marc Short on impasse over impeachment on Capitol Hill

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, showed confidence in the face of the current impeachment strategy being employed by House Democrats led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, stating that, ultimately, he believes they will be the first ones to budge and move what he called a "political exercise" closer to its conclusion.

Pelosi and most of the other Democrats in the House approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump last week for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, yet they have sat on those articles instead of delivering them to the Senate for a trial. Pelosi has claimed that she is waiting for the Republican-controlled Senate to set the process for the trial before she appoints impeachment managers. Meanwhile, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., pushes for the ability to issue subpoenas for additional witnesses and documents.

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"I think her position is really untenable," Short told "Fox News Sunday," later predicting, "She will yield, there's no way she can hold this position."

Short also questioned why Democrats feel the need to include additional witnesses in the first place, given the swift and decisive nature of the impeachment itself.

"If her case is so airtight that she said, that she had to ram it through and it's undeniable, why does she need more witnesses to make her case?" he asked.

Ultimately, Short said he thinks the impeachment is "a political exercise to placate the radical left of their base," and that it is "going nowhere."

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Later in the program, Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., addressed the delay in the delivery of the articles of impeachment, claiming that while she does not know what the House's time frame will be, the present timeline is nothing out of the ordinary.

She pointed out that President Bill Clinton was impeached on Dec. 19, and the House did not appoint their managers until Jan. 6, after Congress returned from the holiday break. She does not believe the current Senate would move any faster, regardless of how quickly the House moved.

"Did you really think the United States Senate was going to start this trial before January 6?" she asked.

Host Chris Wallace pointed out that Pelosi is hoping to use her delay to give Shumer leverage in his discussions with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who has accused Pelosi of having "cold feet."

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Dingell responded to that by criticizing McConnell, who has stated that he is "not an impartial juror."

"I don't call that a fair and impartial hearing," she said.

Original Article

Biden blames staff, says nobody ‘warned’ him son’s Ukraine job could raise conflict

closeBiden says he won't appear as impeachment witness in potential Senate trialVideo

Biden says he won't appear as impeachment witness in potential Senate trial

2020 Democrat hopeful Joe Biden tells Fox News' Peter Doocy he will not voluntarily appear if called to testify in a Senate impeachment trial for President Trump.

Former Vice President Joe Biden claimed in a new interview that when his son Hunter was a board member of Ukrainian energy company Burisma Holdings while he was in office, no one informed him that it could pose a problem.

Biden insisted again that Hunter did nothing wrong, but this time appeared to fault his staff for not cluing him in that there could be concerns about his son's involvement with the foreign company that had been under investigation while Biden was in office and dealing with Ukraine policy.

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"Nobody warned me about a potential conflict of interest. Nobody warned me about that," Biden told NPR in a story posted Monday.

State Department official George Kent addressed this during his testimony as part of the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, acknowledging that he told staff members there was concern over the appearance of a conflict of interest, but that no one told the vice president because his older son Beau was suffering from what was ultimately a fatal battle with brain cancer.

"They should have told me," Biden says now. Hunter's dealings and the elder Biden's role ousting a prosecutor looking into Burisma are being used by Trump and his supporters against the now-2020 presidential candidate, even as Trump's effort to press for an investigation into that conduct has spurred the impeachment inquiry.

"The appearance looked bad and it gave folks like Rudy Giuliani an excuse to come up with a Trumpian kind of defense, while they were violating the Constitution," Biden said.

Trump's impeachment inquiry has focused primarily on his request for Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate the Bidens, as well as Democratic activities during the 2016 election. Democrats have accused Trump of using a White House visit for Zelensky and the delay of military aid to Ukraine as leverage.

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Trump insists he did nothing wrong and that he never called for any quid pro quo with the investigations. His administration claims that Trump was simply concerned about corruption within the Ukrainian government, asserting that is part of why he delayed the aid. Trump has also hammered the Bidens for alleged impropriety, blasting the former vice president for pressuring Ukraine to fire a prosecutor who was investigating Burisma.

In the past, Biden has bragged publicly about threatening to withhold money from Ukraine in order to force the prosecutor's termination, but he claims it was due to suspicions of corruption, not because of his son's role with Burisma.

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Former Secretary of State John Kerry, who recently endorsed Biden for president, also claimed following a Biden campaign event Sunday that he "had no knowledge" of Hunter's involvement with Burisma while he was secretary.

This, despite Kerry's stepson Christopher Heinz reportedly notifying two of Kerry's aides after Hunter Biden became a Burisma board member. Heinz and Hunter Biden had been business partners, co-owning the private equity firm Rosemont Seneca. According to the Washington Examiner, an email from Heinz to Kerry's aides distanced Heinz from Burisma, saying "there was no investment by our firm in their company," and claiming ignorance as to why Hunter became involved in the Ukrainian firm.

Fox News' Rob DiRienzo contributed to this report.

Original Article