DNC Chairman: Democrat Brand Is Broken

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DNC Chairman: Democrat Brand Is Broken jamie harrison speaks into mic Democrat Senate candidate Jamie Harrison speaks at a watch party after losing the Senate race in Columbia, S. C. Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. (Richard Shiro/AP Images)

By Charlie McCarthy | Monday, 05 April 2021 10:09 AM

The Democrat brand is broken and needs to be repaired, according to the Democratic National Committee chairman.

"It's not even just with Republicans," DNC Chairman Jaime Harrison told The Daily Beast's podcast The New Abnormal. "The Democrat brand with some of the folks who are core at the base of our party is not the greatest.

"And so I want to spend a lot of time, energy, and effort understanding why the brand is where it is, what it is and how, and what we can do in order to improve it."

Harrison, who took his position on Jan. 21, lost his bid for a Senate seat to incumbant Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., in November's election. He told the podcast how he dealt with a "tarnished" Democrat brand in South Carolina.

"I experienced it on my own race, Lindsey [Graham] and his crew of dark money effectively labeled me as somebody who believed in defunding the police," Harrison said, according to The Hill. "My grandfather on my stepfather's side was in the Detroit police department for 40 years. So I don’t believe in that.

"But they were able to do it because the Democratic brand had been so tarnished in South Carolina that people would believe anything. If they said, 'Jaime kicked a puppy the other day,' they would have believed it."

With President Joe Biden and Congressional Democrats having passed a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, and now promoting a $2.25 trillion infrastructure plan, Harrison said his party needs to stress its accomplishments, especially in rural areas and red states.

"We have to take credit and claim the things that we will have gotten done over the course of this next two years," Harrison said. "We're going to do a lot for rural America.

"The American Rescue Plan has so much in there for rural communities across this country. And it will have a huge benefit, this infrastructure plan, when we get this done. The broadband component in it alone will totally transform rural America."

Harrison said the Democrat party's message to rural areas will help grow the base, and "persuade a few other folks to take a look at us."

"Those communities are also just as diverse as urban communities. We also need to make sure that we're listening to them," Harrison said. "And then, in the end, we've got to deliver and I believe we can do those things. Not only will we grow our base, but I think we also persuade a few other folks to take a look at us."

Both the DNC and Republican National Committee are gearing up for the 2022 election cycle. Traditionally, the sitting president's party loses seats in midterm elections.

Republicans hope to regain a majority in both the House and Senate. The upper chamber is currently split evenly along party lines, with Vice President Kamala Harris as the tiebreaking vote. Democrats hold a 219-211 edge in the House.

Although it has tended to take a less-active role in midterm elections, the DNC announced a coordinated effort last month to sell President Biden's coronavirus relief package to battleground state voters.

A message guide on how to promote the legislation was sent to Democrat state and national officials.

Original Article

AP-NORC Poll: Border Woes Hurt Biden Approval on Immigration

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AP-NORC Poll: Border Woes Hurt Biden Approval on Immigration AP-NORC Poll: Border Woes Hurt Biden Approval on Immigration Central American migrants walk through Houston's airport during a transfer on March 30 after their release from a U.S. government holding facility in McAllen, Texas. (ED JONES/AFP via Getty Images)

WILL WEISSERT and HANNAH FINGERHUT Monday, 05 April 2021 08:06 AM

More Americans disapprove than approve of how President Joe Biden is handling waves of unaccompanied migrant children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, and approval of his efforts on larger immigration policy falls short of other top issues — suggesting it could be a weak point for the new administration.

A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research also shows that solving the problem of young people at the border is among Americans' highest immigration priorities: 59% say providing safe treatment of unaccompanied children when they are apprehended should be a high priority, and 65% say the same about reuniting families separated at the border.

Former President Donald Trump built his presidency around tough policies that expanded and fortified border walls, made it harder for people fleeing drug violence and other desperate circumstances in Mexico and Central America to seek U.S. asylum, and separated immigrant families.

Biden has tried to seize political momentum on the issue by promising a more humane and orderly system, but his administration has struggled to cope with rising numbers of migrants coming to the border, especially unaccompanied children.

Overall, 40% of Americans disapprove of Biden’s handling of children reaching the nation's southern border without their parents, compared with just 24% who approve. Thirty-five percent don't have an opinion either way.

“I don’t know how to politically correctly say this: I do feel that, because there’s this new administration, that people feel that they can come to the country,” said Mindy Kiehl, a 40-year-old real estate agent in Erie, Pennsylvania, who otherwise approves of Biden's handling of the presidency so far.

“I get it. They’re seeking refuge," Kiehl added. "But bringing these children, it’s not good for the children, it’s not good for the families. I don’t know how that’s going to solve the problem.”

Biden said at a recent news conference that “we’re sending back the vast majority of the families that are coming.” But his struggles on the issue go beyond unaccompanied minors.

Just 42% of Americans say they approve of how the president is handling immigration in general, and a similar share, 44%, say they approve of how he’s handling border security. Both are significantly lower than the 61% of Americans who say they approve of how Biden is handling his job overall and fall short of the president's rating on some other issues, including his response to the coronavirus pandemic and managing of the economy.

That gap comes despite the White House endorsing the most ambitious overhaul of the nation's immigration system in a generation on Biden's first day in office. It has stalled in Congress, though, and Republicans and even some top Democrats say passage will be difficult.

The plan would provide an eight-year path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the U.S. illegally, but the poll shows doing so isn't high on the public's priority list. Only 29% of Americans overall, including 42% of Democrats and 14% of Republicans, called legal status for people in the country illegally a high priority.

Additionally, only a third of Americans each say that allowing refugees to come to the U.S. or expanding “guest worker” programs should be high priorities.

The gap between Biden’s overall approval rating and his handling of immigration crosses party lines. Seventy-four percent of Democrats and 10% of Republicans approve of Biden’s handling of immigration, compared with 96% of Democrats and 22% of Republicans who approve overall.

The difference also comes across racial and ethnic groups. Overall, 92% of Black Americans, 67% of Hispanics and 52% of white Americans say they approve of how Biden is handling his job. On immigration, 74% of Black Americans but only 50% of Hispanics and 34% of white Americans say they approve.

Jack Henes, a retiree in Sebastian, Florida, said Biden hasn’t handled immigration as well as some other hot-button issues while calling what's happening on the U.S. southern border an “administrative nightmare.”

While awaiting the larger legislative package, the Democrat-controlled House has passed smaller-scale reforms that face uncertain futures in a Senate split 50-50. Biden also has used executive actions to attempt to roll back many Trump administration immigration policies but has been criticized for failing to do enough fast enough.

Others feel he's already gone too far.

“My concern is that President Biden has allowed the world to feel it's OK to just come on in,” said Matthew Behrs, a Trump supporter in Wisconsin.

The poll shows many Americans rank some of the major goals of the Democrat proposal as moderate priorities instead of high ones, suggesting Biden lacks a clear mandate for how best to proceed on the issue, potentially hurting his leverage with Congress.

And many want to see efforts to step up enforcement be part of the conversation: For 53%, increasing security at the border is a high priority. Some 47% of Americans also say the federal government should make strengthening policies to prevent immigrants from overstaying their visas a high priority.

Fewer, roughly a third, say penalizing companies that hire immigrants living in the U.S. illegally and deporting immigrants living in the U.S. illegally should be high priorities.

The poll also finds Americans are more likely to favor than oppose providing a way for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to stay legally, 53% to 24%, with 22% saying they are neither in favor nor opposed. Still, just 41% call extending legal protections to so-called Dreamers a high priority. A plan approved by the House but awaiting Senate action seeks to do just that.

Biden has now assigned Vice President Kamala Harris to work with Central American countries to try to address the root causes of illegal immigration. Henes, the retiree, suggested that Biden has given the problem to Harris as a way of buying himself some time — but that it hasn’t helped.

“They’re still in the huddle,” Henes said. “They’re not ready to call a play.”

The AP-NORC poll of 1,166 adults was conducted March 26-29 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak Panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.6 percentage points.

Original Article

DeSantis: ’60 Minutes’ Report on Vaccine Rollout a ‘Fake Narrative’

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DeSantis: '60 Minutes' Report on Vaccine Rollout a 'Fake Narrative' ron desantis speaks onstage at cpac Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at the opening of the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Hyatt Regency on February 26, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Monday, 05 April 2021 08:06 AM

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is fighting back against a report on the coronavirus vaccine rollout in his state as being a "fake narrative" with its allegations that he aimed the distribution and administration of the vaccination toward the wealthy and to his own campaign contributors.

CBS' Sharyn Alfonsi, in an extensive report for "60 Minutes," reported allegations airing Sunday night that the governor had privatized the state vaccine rollout to benefit large donors who donated to his campaign and that he'd funneled the vaccines to wealthy communities at a time when minorities have been struggling to have access to the vaccine.

Florida's Democrat leaders are seeking a Justice Department investigation to determine if DeSantis had been rewarding high-dollar donors through allowing special access to the vaccine.

There have also been other questions raised about whether DeSantis discriminated when picking communities for pop-up vaccination sites, including at Lakewood Ranch in Manatee County just south of Tampa.

In Feburary, the "60 Minutes" report said, the governor announced he was giving 3,000 doses to the community, because "we saw a need, we want to get the numbers up for seniors."

The Lakewood Ranch developer, Pat Neal, however, had donated $135,000 to the Friends of Ron DeSantis PAC, the segment noted.

Alfonsi also reported that the Republican governor had given a contract to the grocery chain Publix to distribute the vaccines exclusively in the Palm Beach area after the company donated $100,000 to his campaign.

DeSantis declined CBS's request for an interview, according to Alfonsi, so she caught up with him at an event near Orlando.

"Publix as you know donated $100,000 to your campaign and then you rewarded them with the exclusive rights to distribute the vaccine in Palm Beach," she said.

"So first of all what you're saying is wrong," DeSantis told her. "I met with the county mayor. I met with the administrator. I met with all the folks in Palm Beach County and I said, 'here's some of the options. We can do more drive-thru sites. We can give more to hospitals. We can do the Publix.' And they said, 'We think that would be the easiest thing for our residents.'"

Alfonsi also told DeSantis that his critics are saying that his awarding the contract amounted to a "pay for play" scheme, and he argued with her again.

"I just disabused you of the narrative and you don't care about the facts because obviously I just laid it out for you in a way that is irrefutable," he said. "So clearly it's not."

And when she tried to question him further, DeSantis shouted over her: "No, no, no. You're wrong. You're wrong. You're wrong."

Meanwhile, Publix responded that there was no connection between its campaign contributions to DeSantis and the partnership to administer the vaccine.

"The irresponsible suggestion that there was a connection between campaign contributions made to Governor DeSantis and our willingness to join other pharmacies in support of the state's vaccine distribution efforts is absolutely false and offensive," the chain said in a statement. "We are proud of our pharmacy associates for administering more than 1.5 million doses of vaccine to date and for joining other retailers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia to do our part to help our communities emerge from the pandemic."

State Rep. Omari Hardy, a Democrat, told "60 Minutes" DeSantis' decision choice to privatize the rollout meant that low-income communities were left without a way to get the shots if they did not have a Publix grocery store. She noted that in one instance, a community's residents, including several elderly residents, had to travel nearly 30 miles to get a shot."

"Before, I could call the public health director. She would answer my calls. But now if I want to get my constituents information about how to get this vaccine I have to call a lobbyist from Publix? That makes no sense," Hardy said. "They're not accountable to the public."

Trump Puts Off Presidential Library

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Trump Puts Off Presidential Library donald trump stands onstage under spotlight Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Mark Niquette and Jennifer Jacobs Monday, 05 April 2021 07:11 AM

Donald Trump is spending his first months as an ex-president trying to ensure that he’s remembered the way he wants — but he’s holding off on plans to establish a library that would enshrine his version of his presidency.

Planning for a library would suggest he’s done being president and that’s not something he’s ready to concede, say people familiar with his thinking. Trump has publicly dangled the possibility that he will seek the Republican nomination in 2024.

“Once he says, ‘I am going to be raising money for my library,’ he’s given up even the pretense of trying to run again,” said Anthony Clark, who has written about the politics and history of presidential libraries.

By delaying a library, Trump puts aside, at least for now, a chance to shape the story of his presidency — as Richard Nixon initially did at his museum by describing the Watergate scandal as a Democrat coup attempt, or as George W. Bush did with a theater that allows participants to vote on the options that he faced such as whether to invade Iraq but ends with a video of Bush explaining his decision.

All presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt have pursued a presidential library as a way to archive and house their records for researchers as well as to burnish their legacies. Bill Clinton joked at Bush’s library opening in 2013 that it was the “latest, grandest example of the eternal struggle of former presidents to rewrite history.”

Before Barack Obama, presidents created nonprofit foundations to raise money from private donors to build libraries and museums that they then donated or leased to the federal government to staff and operate using taxpayer funds. The foundations pay for and create the exhibits, with the National Archives helping to develop the content.

Obama is having his private foundation build and administer his presidential center while allowing the National Archives to handle his records. Nixon initially did that as well with the library he opened in 1990 at his birthplace of Yorba Linda, California, before it was turned over to the government to run in 2007.

Clark said he doubts that Trump will ever have a presidential library because of how expensive and complicated they are to build, how difficult it is to secure a location, and because he didn’t start raising money and planning before leaving office as other presidents did.

Obama started his library foundation in 2014 for an expected $500 million presidential center in Chicago, his adopted hometown, but groundbreaking isn’t expected until this year because of delays from federal reviews and litigation.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center, which includes a library with his records, a museum, the Bush policy institute, and the offices of Bush’s foundation, opened on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas — former first lady Laura Bush’s alma mater — in 2013 after finalists for the site were announced in 2005.

The National Archives has already set up a Trump Presidential Library website with information about the former president and first lady Melania Trump, and holds the records of the Trump administration, which will start to become available in 2026 — though Trump can restrict access for 12 years.

While Trump may want the imprimatur of a library run by the federal government, he’d likely follow Obama’s and Nixon’s early model of having the National Archives handle records separately from a museum that he can fully control, said Timothy Naftali, who served as the first director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum after it became part of the federal system and created a new, nonpartisan Watergate gallery.

If Trump built a private library or tourist attraction for his supporters, that would allow him to depict his presidency the way he wants, Naftali said.

“His museum will have the same spirit as the private Nixon library’s museum,” said Naftali, now a presidential scholar and a clinical associate professor at New York University. “His tweets could be used as the banners for various galleries in the museum. It’ll be a center of Trumpism.”

With the delay, Trump is not only letting others write the history of his presidency, he’s giving up one opportunity to deploy his wildly successful fund-raising skills. Trump and his affiliated committees have raised more than $2.3 billion since he began his presidential campaign in 2015.

He told supporters before he left office in January that he wanted to raise $2 billion for a presidential library, according to The Washington Post, which would be the most ever. The most likely vehicle would be a nonprofit charity, the model used by modern presidents, because donations are tax deductible and the entity doesn’t have to pay tax on the money it raises, said Paul Seamus Ryan of the government-accountability group Common Cause.

He could legally accept money in unlimited amounts from sources including foreign countries, and disclosure of the donors’ identities isn’t required except by registered lobbyists who give $200 or more.

Yet such a charity requires that expenditures are used for the public good and not for private benefit of individuals.

Still, a former Nixon library official says that shouldn’t stop Trump from raising money for it.

“Donald Trump proved in 2020 that he had no problems raising money, and he now has four years, if he wants to, to just dangle that prospect of a return to power in front of potential donors,” said Paul Musgrave, a former special assistant to the director at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

Original Article

Biden fails to mention Jesus in ‘Easter Address,’ speaks of COVID

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 2: U.S. President Joe Biden pauses while speaking about the March jobs report in the State Dining Room of the White House on April 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. According to the U.S. Labor Department, employers added over 900,000 jobs in March, up from 416,000 in February. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Joe Biden. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:45 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Joe Biden has come under fire for failing to mention Jesus Christ in his purported ‘Easter Address.’

However, Biden made sure to mention COVID-19 seven times.

“We share the sentiments of Pope Francis who has said that getting vaccinated is a moral obligation,” Biden said.

Biden, who claims to be a devout Catholic, took an opportunity to promote COVID vaccines in his address, which further stirred the latest fears of the coronavirus.

Critics said his address was an insult as he failed to honor the Christian symbol of faith and instead, used a supposedly religious message for political purposes. Biden’s COVID address also caused dismay among Christian communities, many of whom oppose vaccinations for any purpose.

Critics said the focus of Biden’s address showed the modern left was really worshipping money and power instead of Jesus.

MORE NEWS: GOP Senator Blasts Infrastructure Bill For Removing 2017 Tax Cuts

Original Article

Sen. Barrasso: Border Officials Told Us to Delete Photos of Migrant Facilities

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Sen. Barrasso: Border Officials Told Us to Delete Photos of Migrant Facilities Sen. Barrasso: Border Officials Told Us to Delete Photos of Migrant Facilities Minors lie inside a pod at the Donna Department of Homeland Security holding facility, the main detention center for unaccompanied children in the Rio Grande Valley run by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in Donna, Texas. (AP/Dario Lopez-Mills, Pool)

By Brian Freeman | Sunday, 04 April 2021 10:48 PM

Sen. John Barrasso said on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” that he was told by border officials to delete photos of migrant facilities during a recent visit with other Republican lawmakers.

“We were told to delete the pictures,” the Wyoming senator said. “No one did. You’ve seen the video coming out of all of these kids crammed together under the foil blankets, huddling together.”

He added that that they are “crammed like sardines,” emphasizing that “This is what the Biden administration is trying to hide from the American public.”

Barrasso stressed that “This is both a humanitarian crisis and a national security crisis.”

He also emphasized that the fact that Customs and Border Protection is only testing children when they leave the facilities – rather than when they arrive – means the testing is not halting the spread of the virus.

"They do the instant test. And then those that have been tested positive are just kind of moved to one side of the courtyard, those negative to the other of this courtyard," Barrasso said. "They've all been exposed, and then they're sent all across the country. You know, that is the real tragedy of this. And we're not sure what variant of the of the coronavirus they're carrying. They are carrying it, though, all around America."

Barrasso added that "The irony here is that we're hearing a lot about Joe Biden wanting vaccine passports to prove that people have vaccines," "Meanwhile, the border crossers, they don't even require I.D. We don't know who they are, where they're coming from, what their background is."

Buttigieg: AOC infrastructure plan ‘bolder’ than Biden’s

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA - MARCH 30: U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg attends an event titled “Transforming Rail in Virginia” at the Amtrak-VRE station in March 30, 2021 in Alexandria, Virginia. The Transforming Rail in Virginia program will cost about $3.7 billion and will double Amtrak service and double Virginia Railway Express (VRE) service along the I-95 corridor, as well as work toward the separation of freight and passenger lines. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:10 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg commented on New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s (D-N.Y.) push to make the infrastructure bill bigger. On Sunday, Buttigieg said AOC’s proposal was bolder than the already proposed $2 trillion plan.

He said this was part of the bargaining process as Republicans have asked for a smaller bill and progressives have asked for something larger. Recently, AOC urged Joe Biden to push for a $10 trillion bill, which she claimed to be “realistic.” However, Buttigieg argued the bill has more than enough funding to develop America’s infrastructure.

“There are obviously a lot of people on the other side of the aisle saying, ‘This is too big, too bold,” Buttigieg stated. “And then, some of our friends on our side of the aisle are saying: It should be even bolder.’ Again, that’s a natural part of this conversation and this process, but let me stress, this is the biggest investment in American job creation proposed or, if achieved, since World War II. This is a huge deal.”

Republicans criticized the infrastructure bill for allocating only five percent of its budget for traditional infrastructure maintenance.

MORE NEWS: Biden Fails To Mention Jesus In ‘Easter Address,’ Speaks Of COVID

Original Article

Stanford Holds Off Arizona 54-53 to Win Women’s NCAA Title

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Stanford Holds Off Arizona 54-53 to Win Women's NCAA Title players smile as the pose with the championship trophy

Stanford players celebrate with the trophy after the championship game against Arizona in the women's Final Four NCAA college basketball tournament, Sunday. (AP/Morry Gash)

DOUG FEINBERG Sunday, 04 April 2021 08:52 PM

Tara VanDerveer hugged each of her Stanford players as they climbed the ladder to cut down a piece of the net.

It took 29 years, but VanDerveer and the Cardinal are NCAA women's basketball champions again.

Haley Jones scored 17 points and Stanford beat Arizona 54-53, giving the Cardinal and their Hall of Fame coach their first national championship in 29 years on Sunday night.

“Getting through all the things we got through, we’re excited to win the COVID championship," VanDerveer said. ”The other one was not quite as close, the last one. But we’re really excited. No one knows the score, no one knows who scored, it’s a national championship and I’m really excited to represent Stanford. It’s a great team. We did not play a great game today, however. But if we can win, not playing as well as we need to, I’m excited."

It wasn’t a masterpiece by any stretch with both teams struggling to score and missing easy layups and shots, but Stanford did just enough to pull off the win.

Stanford (31-2) built a nine-point lead in the fourth quarter before Arizona (21-6) cut it to 51-50 on star guard Aari McDonald's 3-pointer.

After a timeout, Jones answered with a three-point play with 2:24 left. That would be Stanford's last basket of the game. McDonald got the Wildcats with 54-53 with 36.6 seconds left converting three of four free throws.

“I just owe it all to my teammates, they have confidence in me when I don’t have confidence in myself,” said Jones, who was honored as the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. “I saw they needed me to come up big and I did.”

The Cardinal, after another timeout couldn't even get a shot off, giving Arizona one last chance with 6.1 seconds left, but McDonald's contested shot from the top of the key at the buzzer bounced off the rim.

“I got denied hard. I tried to turn the corner, they sent three at me. I took a tough, contested shot and it didn’t fall,” said McDonald, who fell near midcourt, slumped in disbelief while the Cardinal celebrated.

It's been quite a journey for VanDerveer and the Cardinal this season. The team was forced on the road for nearly 10 weeks because of the coronavirus, spending 86 days in hotels during this nomadic season.

The team didn’t complain and went about their business and now have another NCAA championship. Along the way the Hall of Fame coach earned her 1,099th career victory to pass Pat Summitt for the most all time in women’s basketball history.

Now the 67-year-old coach has a third national title to go along with the ones she won in 1990 and 1992. That moved her into a tie with Baylor's Kim Mulkey for third most all time behind Geno Auriemma and Summitt.

VanDerveer had many great teams between titles, including the ones led by Candice Wiggins and the Ogwumike sisters — Nneka and Chiney, but the Cardinal just couldn't end their season with that elusive win in the title game until Sunday night.

It was the first women’s basketball championship for the Pac-12 since VanDerveer and Stanford won the title in 1992. The last time a team from the conference was in the title game was 2010 when the Cardinal lost to UConn. That game was also played in the Alamodome — the site of every game in this tournament from the Sweet 16 through Sunday’s championship game.

The entire NCAA Tournament was played in the San Antonio area because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While Stanford had history on its side, Arizona has been building under coach Adia Barnes, who was the fourth Black woman to lead her team to the championship game, joining Carolyn Peck, Dawn Staley and C. Vivian Stringer. Peck and Staley won titles.

Barnes starred for the Wildcats as a player in the late 90s and came back to her alma mater five years ago. She guided the team to the WNIT title in 2019 and led them to their first NCAA title game ever. This was the team's first appearance in the NCAA Tournament since 2005 — although the Wildcats would have made the NCAAs last season had it not been canceled by the coronavirus.

The Wildcats started the season No. 7 in the poll and moved up to as high as sixth — the best ranking ever in school history —for a few weeks.

McDonald, who followed her coach from Washington as a transfer, has been a huge reason for the team's success. The 5-foot-6 guard, who is lightning quick, is one of the rare two-way players in the game who can make an impact on both ends of the court.

She struggled against the Cardinal, finishing with 22 points while going 5-for-20 from the field.

McDonald got the Wildcats on the board hitting a 3-pointer, but then Stanford scored the next 12 points. The Cardinal led 16-8 after one quarter.

Arizona got going in the second quarter and took a 21-20 lead before Stanford scored 11 straight points, highlighted by Lexie Hull's four-point play. The Cardinal led 31-24 at the half. McDonald missed nine of her 11 shots in the first half.

The Wildcats were trying to be only the fourth team to trail by double digits and win a championship.

These teams met twice during the regular season and Stanford rolled past Arizona both times, winning by double digits in each game.

TIP-INS:

Sunday night’s game was the first with two teams from west of the Mississippi playing for a title since 1986. … Notre Dame had the biggest comeback of any team in the NCAA title game rallying from 15 down to win the 2018 title on a last-second shot by Arike Ogunbowale.

STRUGGLING AGAINST STANFORD

Barnes has beaten VanDerveer just twice in her career as both a player and coach at Arizona. She lost seven of eight playing for the Wildcats in the late 90s. The lone victory came in her senior year on a last-second shot off a pass from Barnes to teammate Reshea Bristol, who hit a 20-footer for the win in 1998. As a coach she had lost 10 of the 11 previous matchups before Sunday with the only victory coming in overtime on Feb. 28, 2020.

Prayer Vigil Planned for Stricken Rapper DMX

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Prayer Vigil Planned for Stricken Rapper DMX Prayer Vigil Planned for Stricken Rapper DMX DMX (Getty Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 08:09 PM

A prayer vigil was planned for Monday outside the suburban New York hospital where rapper DMX remained on life support Sunday following a heart attack.

The family of the rapper said in an email Sunday that the vigil will be held outside White Plains Hospital at 5 p.m.

“On Friday night, April 2nd, 2021, our brother, son, father, and colleague DMX, birth name of Earl Simmons, was admitted to White Plains (NY) Hospital, facing serious health issues,” the family said through a publicist. “We ask that you please keep Earl/DMX and us in your thoughts, wishes, and prayers as well as respect our privacy as we face these challenges.”

Another statement released Sunday afternoon said the rapper remained in a coma and was on a ventilator.

Simmons' longtime lawyer, Murray Richman, said the rapper was admitted to the intensive care unit at White Plains Hospital after going into cardiac arrest. Richman said he could not confirm reports that DMX, 50, overdosed on drugs and was not sure what caused the heart attack.

DMX made a splash in rap music in 1998 with his first studio album “It’s Dark and Hell is Hot,” which debuted No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. The multiplatinum selling album was anchored by several hits including “Ruff Ryders’ Anthem,” “Get At Me Dog” and “Stop Being Greedy.”

The rapper had four other chart-topping albums including “…And Then There Was X,” “Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood,” “The Great Depression” and “Grand Champ.” He has released seven albums and earned three Grammy nominations.

Along with his music career, DMX paved his way as an actor. He starred in the 1998 film “Belly” and appeared in “Romeo Must Die” a couple years later with Jet Li and the late singer Aaliyah. DMX and Aaliyah teamed up for the film’s soundtrack song “Come Back in One Piece.”

The rapper also starred in “Exit Wounds” with Steven Seagal and “Cradle 2 the Grave” with Li.

Over the years, DMX has battled with substance abuse. The rapper canceled a series of shows to check himself into a rehabilitation facility in 2019. In an Instagram post, his team said he apologized for the canceled shows and thanked his fans for the continued support.

Last year, DMX faced off against Snoop Dogg in a Verzuz battle, which drew more than 500,000 viewers.

GOP Senator blasts infrastructure bill for removing 2017 tax cuts

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) is seen in the Senate Reception room as the Senate takes a short recess on the fifth day of the Senate Impeachment trials for former President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate will hear closing arguments and possibly vote on whether to convict former President Donald Trump for inciting the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6. (Photo by Greg Nash - Pool/Getty Images)

Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). (Photo by Greg Nash – Pool/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 5:05 PM PT – Sunday, April 4, 2021

Mississippi Senator Roger Wicker (R) suggested Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill was not meant to pass with bipartisan support. While speaking with NBC, Wicker said the removal of President Trump’s signature 2017 tax cuts was enough to lose all Republican support.

Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS) asks a question during an oversight hearing to examine the Federal Communications Commission on June 24, 2020 in Washington,DC. - The hearing was held by the Senate Committee for Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (Photo by Jonathan Newton / POOL / AFP) (Photo by JONATHAN NEWTON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Senator Roger Wicker. (Photo by JONATHAN NEWTON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

The senator said raising taxes will make it more difficult for states to restore their economies amid the pandemic. He added, Biden’s tax increase will not only affect corporations, but small businesses too.

“When you talk about big businesses and you say we should raise the tax rate from 21 percent corporate rate to 28 percent,” Wicker said. “Let me just tell you, that’s going to cut job creation in the United States.”

Wicker said he is willing to work with Democrats to produce a more bi-partisan plan and even named Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg as a potential colleague.

MORE NEWS: Miss. Gov. Reeves: Biden’s Spending Plan Is A Political Statement

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Pentagon Approves Third Military Base to House Migrant Children

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Pentagon Approves Third Military Base to House Migrant Children Pentagon Approves Third Military Base to House Migrant Children A migrant from Guatemala holding a child arrives in the U.S., crossing the Rio Grande in a raft piloted by smugglers on March 30, 2021 in Roma, Texas. (Joe Raedle/Getty)

By Nick Koutsobinas | Sunday, 04 April 2021 05:50 PM

The Pentagon on Friday approved the use of a California Army National Guard base to house unaccompanied migrant children traveling alone, reports The Associated Press. The housing, located at Camp Roberts in central California, is said only to be temporary. It is not known how many children will be placed there.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Saturday it has not finalized its decision and that the camp is “under active consideration.”

“When HHS decides to activate an Emergency Influx Site for unaccompanied migrant children we will notify state and local authorities as well as members of Congress,” the department said in a statement.

But a defense official told Fox News HHS approved the decision.

"On April 2, the Department of Defense approved a request for assistance from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for facilities and land to temporarily house unaccompanied children at Camp Roberts, California."

"This support is being provided on a fully-reimbursable basis… DoD only provides this kind of support where it has no impact on military readiness and its ability to conduct its primary missions."

Border authorities have encountered more than 9,000 children since February, a record high since May 2019, which saw 11,000 unaccompanied children at the border. President Joe Biden during his first month in office suspended Title 42 for unaccompanied children only. The policy, which began last March under the Trump administration, allows Customs and Border Protection to expel undocumented migrants to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus in holding facilities.

According to Fox, Customs and Border Protection encountered approximately 171,000 migrants in March.

Former CBP Commissioner Mark Morgan and Heritage senior research fellow Lora Ries say the crisis is only getting worse.

"We have a crisis on the border, even though the Biden administration still refuses to acknowledge it… Today's numbers are just more evidence of this undeniable reality – and proof that President Biden's policies are driving this crisis."

Original Article

Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure

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Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure Sen. Roy Blunt: GOP Would Support $615B in Actual Infrastructure Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) asks questions during a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs & Senate Rules and Administration joint hearing to discuss the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Greg Nash-Pool/Getty)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 03:36 PM

The Biden administration is making a "big mistake" in loading up a $2.25 trillion infrastructure package with things that do not pertain to roads, bridges, airports, or technology, says Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., who rebuked the legislation as a "purely partisan exercise."

"I think there's an easy win here for the White House if they would take that win, which is make this an infrastructure package, which is about 30% – even if you stretch the definition of infrastructure some – it's about 30% of the $2.25 trillion we are talking about spending," Blunt said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday."

Blunt noted about 30% of the proposal would be roughly $615 billion for roads, bridges, airports, transportation, services, and even things Democrats could loosely call infrastructure.

Instead, Blunt lamented, Democrats are pushing a massive spending package that includes a lot more non-infrastructure spending much like they did with the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, the American Rescue Plan.

Democrats are "trying to take 70 percent of this bill and call it infrastructure in a new way than we've ever talked about infrastructure before," Blunt said. "That means you're looking at another partisan package just like we had with COVID."

Democrats are clever about sneaking spending measures under the umbrellas of popular spending bills like COVID-19.

"Obviously, Democrats have figured out that infrastructure is something we need and something that's popular," Blunt said, pointing to public-private partnerships in paying for infrastructure programs and perhaps user-fee related taxes like gas tax or road fares.

"Whatever it would be, it would be a true bipartisan discussion as opposed to asking every Republican in the Senate who was there in 2017 to change their mind on a tax package that frankly, that had a lot to do with 3.5% unemployment rate we had a year ago when COVID started," Blunt said. "I think people have always accepted the user-tax concept of the transportation system."

As for the Democrats seeking to tax corporations at a 28% rate instead of the Trump tax reform rate of 21%, Blunt suggested that the tax cut paid for itself with economic growth, corporate repatriation, and greater American growth domestic product.

Taking the U.S. back to 28% would make it the second-highest tax rate in the world, he said.

"Other countries saw the success we were having and many reduced their corporate tax rate to try to keep their jobs at home," he concluded.

Original Article

Chris Christie: Biden Is a ‘Liar and a Hypocrite’ for Election Law Rhetoric

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Chris Christie: Biden Is a 'Liar and a Hypocrite' for Election Law Rhetoric chris christie and rudy giuliani walk through a door Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (L) and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani arrive at a news conference in the Briefing Room of the White House on Sept. 27, 2020 i(Joshua Roberts/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:30 PM

President Joe Biden is a hypocrite and a liar, according to Chris Christie, by pouring gasoline on raging election integrity and racial injustice fires for political expediency.

"Here's what Joe Biden's got to live with when he wakes up this morning on Easter morning: He is doing exactly what he sat around in the campaign and the transition and accused Donald Trump of doing; he is lying to cause racial divisions in this country," Christie told ABC's "This Week."

"That's what he accused Donald Trump of doing, and he's a liar and a hypocrite this morning."

Christie, the former GOP governor of New Jersey, had a firm back-and-forth with former Democrat Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on whether or not Biden is lying in his rebuke of Georgia's election reforms, which were codified into law after Democrats used the guise of COVID-19 to make massive 2020 election changes without passing them through the state legislature.

Biden was lying because the Georgia election reforms "expands early voting in Georgia" when "the president said it ended it," according to Christie.

"Let's talk about what the Georgia law is really about because we haven't had much of that," Christie said. "Drop boxes now become a permanent part of the Georgia landscape. They were not prior to COVID. They are now.

"Minimum of 17 days of early voting, including two Saturdays and two optional Sundays. You're going to have all voters being able to have multiple ways to prove who they are, driver's license, last four numbers of your Social Security number, even a utility bill or a free ID provided by the state of Georgia, and voting is going to be until – from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. as it is right now in Georgia."

Christie noted other states do not have as expansive early voting as Georgia, so the Democrat narrative it is restrictive is a lie on Biden's part, he said.

"Well, Stacey Abrams, by the way, Stacey Abrams was in New Jersey, in my state, praising Phil Murphy this week for a voting law where New Jersey early voting is nine days – half, half of what Georgia is," Christie told ABC's George Stephanopoulos, a former communications director for ex-President Bill Clinton.

"Yet she's on TV in New Jersey – I saw it myself – saying that this is one of the greatest voting expansion bills we've ever seen, but this is Jim Crow? I'm sorry, George."

Christie said Biden has broken his inauguration vow for unity, seeking to divide Americans on constitutional election law changes duly passed by state legislators – while H.R. 1 seeks to do something on the Democrats' behalf in Congress.

"Politics need not be a raging fire that destroys everything in its path," Christie said. "Every disagreement doesn't have to be a cause for total war, and we must reject a culture in which facts themselves are manipulated or made up.

"And Joe Biden's broken his own rule, 84 days. And now, he's lying to the American people, George. He's lying about this bill. He's lying to the American people about it to cause the raging fire he said he was going to put out. I'm very disappointed."

Original Article

AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas ‘Billions of Dollars’

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AG Paxton Says Open Borders Cost Texas 'Billions of Dollars' ken paxton stands at a mic with the court in the background Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks outside of the US Supreme Court in 2019.(Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:22 PM

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Sunday President Joe Biden’s open border policies are costing the state “billions of dollars.”

In an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” Paxton said the migrant surge is “a humanitarian disaster and the border towns are suffering more than any others.”

“We have the burdens in our state, we will have to educate them and take care of their health care, we have to figure out their family situation and deal with law enforcement issues,” he said. “It costs the state of Texas billions of dollars.”

“Every time the administration like Obama administration, the Biden administration, opens up the border, it increases our cost,” he added.“We also have the social cost, the crime, increased crime. I wish President [Joe] Biden would talk to the families that have been affected by the crime who have lost loved ones because of immigration. I think it might affect him and give him a different perspective on the downside of the policies that are devastating some of the families in my state.”

Paxton asserted Biden doesn’t have the power to change immigration law.

“He announced for the first 100 days of his administration that you can come across the border and you would not be deported,” he said. “That's not his job to change the law and I think his policies, his announced policies, send the signal to the world, ‘Come across the border and you'll be welcome, you'll be taken care of.’

“I think it's clear that he wants that to happen because he knows from past experience under the Obama administration that if you do that, people will come and it totally worked.”

Paxton also echoed the criticism of Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, of HR1.

“Labeling this the ‘corrupt politicians act’ is absolutely true because it would eliminate voter ID, which we do in our state to verify that you are the right person voting,” he said.

“It would push mail-in ballots which are the highest incidents of voter fraud and allow for felons to votes and would allow for illegals and do everything possible to open up elections so they are not credible anymore,” he continued.

“I think it will ruin the democracy and make our election totally unreliable in every single state instead of just a few,” he said.

But he said it was just one of the measures he is concerned about coming from the Biden administration.

“We are extremely concerned about what this administration is doing even with things like the Keystone pipeline,” he said. “We think they are in a war against fossil fuel and there's no good stated purpose for shutting down the Keystone pipeline… we are losing jobs and we have to ship that through railcar which is not environmentally friendly like pipeline. I have not heard one good reason for shutting down the pipeline.”

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Gov. Reeves: Infrastructure Plan Is a ‘Political Statement’ Resembling Green New Deal

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Gov. Reeves: Infrastructure Plan Is a 'Political Statement' Resembling Green New Deal tate reeves stands in front of a campaign sign for himself and the trump pence campaing Mississipppi Gov. Tate Reeves (Brandon Dill/Getty Images)

Sunday, 04 April 2021 01:06 PM

Mississippi GOP Gov. Tate Reeves said Sunday the Biden administration’s infrastructure plan is a “political statement” that resembles the progressive Green New Deal more than a plan to rebuild the nation’s roads, bridges, trains and airports.

In an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Reeves said infrastructure repair need not be tied to a $2 trillion tax hike — and we shouldn’t spend more on electric vehicles.

“This plan spends $110 billion on roads and bridges and spends more than that on the combination of Amtrak and public transit,” he said. “What's even worse, it spends $100 billion on clean water, which Mississippi can certainly use.

“It spends more on subsidizing electric vehicles — $155 billion to subsidize electric vehicles,” he continued. “That is a political statement. It's not a statement on trying to improve our infrastructure in America so it looks more like the Green New Deal than an infrastructure plan. “

According to Reeves, the nation needs a plan “we can afford and pay for and to truly invest in the infrastructure needs in this country.”

“We don't have to hike tax by $2 trillion to do it,” he insisted.

Reeves asserted the infrastructure work could be paid for in “different ways,” though he wasn’t specific.

“One way you pay for it is by seeing significant improved economic growth,” he said. “We saw that throughout the Trump administration, because the policies were pro business. They were pro growth and revenue has improved.”

Reeves also weighed in on vaccine compliance, and said education — and not endorsements — is the key.

“The vaccine is our path towards normalcy. It's one that I hope more folks across the country will recognize,” he said.

“We need the educate folks, we need to make sure we educate all people and let them know this vaccine is safe. …I think the education piece is more important than the endorsement piece.”

“It's kind of like politics. Getting endorsements are important,” he added. “At the end of the day, you got to educate the voters on why you should be elected. So I think that's something we need to work on.”

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Ex-NYPD Commish Ray Kelly: Mayor de Blasio ‘Has Destroyed’ NYC

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Ex-NYPD Commish Ray Kelly: Mayor de Blasio 'Has Destroyed' NYC bill de blasio stands at a bank of microphones and speaks New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a press conference with Governor Andrew Cuomo in 2018. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 12:59 PM

New York City remains "closed down" with no end in sight, and former NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly said Mayor Bill de Blasio has "destroyed" the city.

"Unfortunately, I don't see it coming back anytime soon," Kelly, the father of Newsmax TV host Greg Kelly, told "The Cats Roundtable" on WABC 770 AM-N.Y. "I love New York. I've lived here my whole life, was born here, going to die here, but it's not the place it was 10 years ago.

"Compare the end of the Bloomberg administration, a little less than 8 years ago, with the end of the de Blasio administration. It's the difference between night and day. This man has destroyed the city. This will be his legacy."

Most alarming for the longtime top cop and potential future mayoral candidate is the recent outlawing of qualified immunity for police officers in New York City, Kelly told host John Catsimatidis.

"Isn't it incredible, John, that these politicians think that their constituents are more concerned about hamstringing the police than in protecting them?" Kelly said. "They may be right. The world has turned upside down.

"This elimination of qualified immunity is just another example of politicians throwing obstacles in the path of police officers so they can't do their jobs. It's clear that they want cops to do literally nothing."

Qualified immunity had protected New York City police officers from civil lawsuits, but now criminals can sue police for alleged wrongdoing that will get tied up in courts and lead to cops "stepping back" from enforcing the laws and protecting the community, Kelly said.

"Police officers, they're not going to jeopardize the well-being of their family, their own well-being," he continued. "They will step back; they have stepped back

"If you look at crime reduction in New York City, it’s a very bleak picture. There's no light at the end of the tunnel."

Supporting police is so difficult politically now, Kelly said, noting none of the city's mayoral candidates have talked about being tough on crime, which used to be a platform selling point.

"The mayoral candidates so far are not talking about any sort of crime reduction," Kelly said. "It's all about monitoring, restricting the police. I just don't get it. I've been around a long time.

"You can remember the days when politicians would say, 'I'm tougher on crime than my opponent.' Now, you don't hear any of that."

Equally concerning to Kelly is the lack of talk about mental health issues in society leading to dangerous crime in New York City.

"That terrible attack on the Asian woman on Monday — it kind of made you sick," Kelly said of the women beaten outside of an apartment building in broad daylight. "I think it's indicative of a much deeper problem: the huge number of people who need mental health assistance on the streets of our city, roaming free. These are the people pushing subway riders onto the tracks. They are the ones who are creating assaults.

"We need something done. As far as I can see, there's nobody even talking about this issue."

Concern of the lack of safety in the city is only increasing, despite the coronavirus pandemic lockdowns making it a relative "ghost town," Kelly concluded.

"The Zoom phenomenon is upon us: People can stay home, people are staying home and doing work and getting paid for it," Kelly said. "Those businesses, mom and pop stores, if they even exist anymore, those restaurants are not going to come back unless you have pedestrian traffic. Look on the streets of Manhattan. You don't see anybody. 'It's a ghost town.

"I'm unfortunately pessimistic about the future of New York."

Original Article

Stephen Moore: Biden Spending on ‘Outrageous Boondoggles’

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Stephen Moore: Biden Spending on 'Outrageous Boondoggles' stephen moore sits on the stage and speaks with a cpac sign behind him. Economist Stephen Moore speaks at CPAC 2020. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 04 April 2021 12:02 PM

President Joe Biden's massive spending programs are beyond what the former President Barack Obama administration pushed, or even what Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., proposed, Trump economist Stephen Moore warned.

"You're going to see so many outrageous boondoggles where they are giving away all of this money to these [green] companies, a lot of them are going to go bankrupt," Sunday's "The Cats Roundtable" WABC 770 AM-N.Y. "I am very nervous about this.

"The American people have to rise up and say this is not the way we run our country. We pay our bills. We don't massively increase our debt. We don't put our financial system in jeopardy.

Among the spending packages were the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan that was called coronavirus relief, but only a fraction of it went to actual pandemic response, and a lot of the money was deferred over a long period of time, making its urgency a moot point, Republicans argued.

Moore told host John Catsimatidis the $2 trillion infrastructure plan is similarly misrepresented as infrastructure, and it is "bridge too far."

"We are in the midst of one of the largest federal power grabs in the history of the country," Moore lamented. "This week, President Biden announced this massive $2 trillion so-called infrastructure bill that's really the Green New Deal.

"They're doing another $2 trillion spending deal on top of that, which will be announced in the next couple of weeks, which will be more money for daycare and education and all these things. This is now $6 trillion of spending that has been recommended by Biden.

"I am very nervous about the impact that this will have on our financial system. It is an amazing amount of new power that we are giving to the people in Washington. It tramples on a lot of the states. And I think this is not going to be a stimulus for the economy."

Ultimately, all this spending will put the U.S. in the dangerous position of being "an incredible debtor to the rest of the world," because it is a "lie" that Biden can pay for these programs by merely taxing the top 1%, Moore said.

"People who voted for Biden tell me they don't understand what's going on in Washington," Moore continued. "They don't understand where the money is going to come from. The idea that we are going to pay for all of this just taxing the top 1% is a lie.

"I think everybody knows you're not going to get trillions and trillions of dollars out of the top 1%. They're going to have to come after the middle class."

But "a revolt is brewing," Moore said.

"America is waking up to the fact that Biden has moved to the left of Bernie Sanders," he said. "I don't know who he's listening to, but this idea that we can bring the country to the brink of bankruptcy to fight climate change and to massively increase the welfare state is very dangerous."

It will eventually wind up in voters' hands to "stop this train from going over the cliff," Moore conclude.

"I think people have started to shift their opinion," he said. "They thought that Biden would be a moderate, centrist Democrat. He's getting a lot of bad advice in the White House. Let's turn him around so we don't bankrupt our great country."

Original Article

Turkey begins requiring negative PCR test for travel

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A woman wears a protective face mask while walking on Galata bridge in Istanbul, Turkey amid the outbreak of COVID-19. (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:05 PM PT – Saturday, December 26, 2020

Turkey has begun requiring proof of a negative COVID-19 test in order to board an incoming plane. Turkey’s health minister announced the new policy Friday, which bars those who fail to comply.

All passengers flying in from Britain, South Africa or Denmark will be required to quarantine in addition to providing a negative test result. This is a change from Turkey’s previous policy, which only required a test for those showing symptoms.

One traveler said her trip to Amsterdam was derailed since she couldn’t get a PCR test on such short notice.

“Yesterday at 20 past 8 p.m., I got an email from Eurostar that if I want to go to Amsterdam, I need a PCR test,” the traveler said. “But how can I get PCR test in the night or even in one day?”

These new international requirements are effecting travelers worldwide. Only more changes are expected to come as countries continue to issue new policies to combat the pandemic.

MORE NEWS: Congress Is Focused On COVID-19 Relief Bill, Gov’t Funding

Original Article

Alan Dershowitz to Newsmax TV: More Pardons, Less Indictments

Alan Dershowitz to Newsmax TV: More Pardons, Less Indictments (Newsmax TV's "Saturday Report")

By Eric Mack | Saturday, 26 December 2020 10:17 AM

President Donald Trump is well within his constitutional rights to grant pardons, and, in fact, there should be more pardons and less talk about indicting the president once he leaves office, according to legal expert Alan Dershowitz on Newsmax TV.

"I certainly hope he doesn't get indicted; that's what banana republics do: They indict their presidents after their presidents lose an election," Dershowitz told "Saturday Report," saying "there is no real possibility" of Trump being indicted. "Let's let the president go on; let's have him finish his term.

"I hope comes to the inauguration; I hope for peaceful transition, and already we see a peaceful transition going on. Let's move on to the next administration: No incriminations, no prosecutions."

Media criticism of President Trump's recent pardons are ignoring the amount of former President Barack Obama's pardon total at the end of his first term and the constitutional authority to correct miscarriages of justice with restorative justice.

"The media is just wrong: President Trump understands better than previous presidents that the pardon power is part of the system of checks and balances," Dershowitz told host Carl Higbie. "He understands when the executive and judicial branches get out of whack, it's the job of the president to restore justice."

Trump's pardons to date, even if they have been tied to the Russia investigation, are neither corruption nor unwarranted, Dershowitz said.

"No only is it not corrupt, it's absolutely proper," Dershowitz added. "The president feels very strongly that the Mueller commission acted improperly – and if that's his belief and he believes that strongly, and he has a basis for it, he should be pardoning and commuting people who were the victims of an injustice.

"That's not corruption."

In fact, Dershowitz wishes "the president in his last days would grant even more pardons," praising the pardon review process the Trump administration has in place.

"I think he should be praised and commended, and I think he should give more pardons, more commutations, and exercise his full power under the Constitution," Dershowitz added. "That's what he's supposed to do."

Important: See Newsmax TV now carried in 70 million cable homes, on DirecTV Ch. 349, Dish Network Ch. 216, Xfinity Ch. 1115, Spectrum, U-verse Ch. 1220, FiOS Ch. 615, Optimum Ch. 102, Cox cable, Suddenlink Ch. 102, CenturyLink 1209, Mediacom Ch. 277, Frontier 615 or Find More Cable Systems – Click Here.