DNC chair wants to reform caucuses to encourage diversity

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez, addresses member of the audience on stage Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, before the start of a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC News, Apple News, and WMUR-TV at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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UPDATED 5:01 PM PT — Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez has claimed he wants to reform the Democrat caucuses. During an interview Wednesday, Perez said he wanted to review the order of when each primary happens to reflect a more diverse voter base and give candidates more of a chance to stand out.

This came after Perez suffered intense backlash for appearing to change the committee’s donor requirements, which allowed Michael Bloomberg to participate in the most recent round of debates. Despite the criticism, the chairman claimed he is ready to have a serious discussion about making presidential races a “level field for everyone.”

Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to supporters Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

“Parties should be in the business, in my judgement, of helping Democrats up and down the ticket win,” stated Perez. “I want to make sure that we reflect the grand diversity of our party in everything we do, including how we administer our primary system.”

Perez has refused calls for his resignation in the wake of the donor requirement scandal.

RELATED: Democrats Come Down On DNC Chair Tom Perez In Wake Of Iowa Caucus

Original Article

DNC chair wants to reform caucuses to encourage diversity

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez, addresses member of the audience on stage Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, before the start of a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC News, Apple News, and WMUR-TV at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 5:01 PM PT — Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez claimed he wants to reform the Democrat caucuses.

During an interview Wednesday, Perez said he wanted to review the order of when each primary happens to reflect a more diverse voter base and give candidates more of a chance to stand out.

Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to supporters Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

This came after Perez suffered intense backlash for appearing to change the committee’s donor requirements, which allowed Michael Bloomberg to participate in the most recent round of debates.

Despite the criticism, the chairman claimed he is ready to have a serious discussion about making presidential races a “level field for everyone.”

“Parties should be in the business, in my judgement, of helping Democrats up and down the ticket win,” stated Perez. “I want to make sure that we reflect the grand diversity of our party in everything we do, including how we administer our primary system.”

Perez has refused calls for his resignation in the wake of the donor requirement scandal.

RELATED: Democrats Come Down On DNC Chair Tom Perez In Wake Of Iowa Caucus

Original Article

Sen. Graham compliments Rep. Schiff on oral arguments, but wants trial to be over

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to the media before attending the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 3:10 PM PT — Thursday, January 23, 2020

Sen. Lindsey Graham is clarifying his interaction with lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff. While speaking to reporters on Thursday, the South Carolina senator said Rep. Schiff was well-spoken during Wednesday’s arguments.

“He’s well-spoken, did a good job of…making the email come alive,” said Graham. “Quite frankly, I thought they did a good job of taking bits and pieces of the evidence and creating a quilt out of it.”

Despite these compliments, Graham insisted he was not on board with calling for additional witnesses and evidence. He stated he wants to get the trial over with.

“They could have called all these people if they wanted to in the House. They denied the president his day in court and I’m not going to legitimize that. There are a bunch of people on my side who want to call Joe Biden and Hunter Biden. I want to end this thing sooner rather than later, I don’t want to turn it into a circus.” – Lindsey Graham, U.S. Senator (R-S.C.)

He added Biden isn’t above being investigated over he and his sons’ dealings with Ukraine.

RELATED: Sen. Graham: Voters Should Decide Presidency, Not Politicians

Original Article

Schumer says he wants impeachment trial focused on facts, not ‘conspiracy theories’ as he balks at GOP calling witnesses

closeSen. Schumer: If Republicans refuse witnesses they’re 'engaged in a cover-up'Video

Sen. Schumer: If Republicans refuse witnesses they’re 'engaged in a cover-up'

Chuck Schumer makes his plea to Republicans for witnesses at the Senate trial for impeachment

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said during a news conference Monday that any Senate impeachment trial should be “focused on the facts that the House presented, not on conspiracy theories” – an apparent slight at Republican attempts to alleviate blame on President Trump by casting aspersions on former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter’s business dealings in Ukraine.

“I think the trial should be focused on the facts that the House presented, not on conspiracy theories that some established liar puts forward,” Schumer said just hours after publically releasing a letter he sent to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., outlining how he would like a Senate impeachment trial to proceed.

Schumer added: “We ought to stick to the facts, and if there are other witnesses who might have witnessed what happened, who might have very strong evidence on the facts that the House presented. I'd certainly want to hear who they are.”

IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, SENATE REPUBLICANS COULD TURN TABLES ON DEMS

In his letter to McConnell, the New York Democrat specifically asked that four witnesses be called during the trial: Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff; Robert Blair, a senior Mulvaney adviser; John Bolton, the former nation-security adviser; and Michael Duffey of the Office of Management and Budget.

“These are the four who have the most direct contact to the facts that are in dispute — most particularly, why was the aid to Ukraine delayed?” Schumer said. “There is no reason on God's green earth why they shouldn't be called and testify unless you're afraid of what they might say.”

Schumer: McConnell taking cues from White House; 'very partisan, very slanted, very unfair'Video

Republicans in the Senate, however, have signaled their interest in calling different witnesses in a Trump trial — such as Hunter Biden and former Democratic National Committee consultant Alexandra Chalupa, both of whom Republicans in the House tried to call only to be blocked by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif.

At the center of the impeachment inquiry: allegations that Trump tried pressing Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to launch politically related investigations regarding the Bidens’ dealings in Ukraine, as well as issues related to the 2016 presidential election. The president’s request came after millions in U.S. military aid to Ukraine had been frozen, which Democrats have argued showed a “quid pro quo” arrangement. Trump and the White House repeatedly have denied any wrongdoing.

The House Judiciary Committee last week voted to adopt two articles of impeachment against Trump, alleging abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, on a party-line vote of 23-17. A final roll call in the full House is expected this week.

Sen. Chuck Schumer: Democrats are committed to having a fair trial in the SenateVideo

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Schumer also responded to criticism that during the Senate impeachment trial of then-President Bill Clinton in 1999, he had adamantly opposed calling witnesses to testify before the upper chamber of Congress.

“The witnesses in 1999 had already given grand jury testimony. We knew what they were to say,” he said. “The four witnesses we've called have not been heard from. That is a big difference.”

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Original Article