Warren campaign cancels $500K in S.C. ads, $60K in Nevada after latest plunge in polls

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks to supporters at a primary election night rally, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

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UPDATED 2:20 PM PT — Wednesday, February 12, 2020

2020 Democrat hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is cancelling campaign ads after a massive plunge in the polls. According to new reports, Warren has canceled $500,000 worth of campaign ads in South Carolina.

Her campaign also canceled $60,000 worth of ads in Nevada ahead of the Democrat debate later this month. Mike Bloomberg surged past her in the latest Quinnipiac and HarrisX polls.

The reports are stirring speculation Warren could drop out of the race as she struggles to maintain voter support. Thus far, the senator has rejected such claims.

“The fight we’re in, the fight to save our democracy, is an uphill battle, but our campaign is built for the long haul and were just getting started,” she said.

The Warren campaign reportedly still has around $300,000 worth of ads in both South Carolina and Nevada, as well as $67,000 worth of airtime in Maine.

READ MORE: Latest Polls Show Elizabeth Warren Trailing In N.H.

Supporters listen to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speak at a primary election night rally, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Original Article

Latest polls show Elizabeth Warren trailing in N.H.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks to members of the media on a media bus outside at a campaign stop at Rochester Opera House, Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, in Rochester, N.H. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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UPDATED 7:37 AM PT — Tuesday, February 11, 2020

The latest polls in New Hampshire show Sen Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) lagging behind other Democrat presidential front-runners in the state. For example, a new Reuters poll showed Warren with 11 percent support, trailing behind Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden as well as former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Warren was hoping to win in the Granite Atate as it shares a border with her home state of Massachusetts. The senator has been doubling down on claims that she’s running a grassroots campaign that doesn’t receive money from billionaire donors.

“I don’t have a campaign that has been shaped by a bunch of consultants, you figured that one out,’ she stated. “I don’t have a campaign that has a bunch of proposals that are carefully designed not to offend big donors, I passed that stop sign a long time ago.”

Warren has also taken aim at former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg in recent days, following his unexpected victory in Iowa. Meanwhile, Sanders has continued to outperform her in polls for her home state of Massachusetts.

RELATED: Greta Wall previews N.H. primary with Faith and Freedom executive director

Original Article

Elizabeth Warren to meet with Native American groups in Oklahoma as DNA controversy lingers

closeWhy Elizabeth Warren's wealth plan would wreck the economyVideo

Why Elizabeth Warren's wealth plan would wreck the economy

"Regressive taxes strangle the economy," says Don Peebles, former member Obama National Finance Committee, explaining why Elizabeth Warren's wealth plan is a "failed idea."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., will return to Oklahoma City on Sunday, where she will meet with Native American groups as part of a reported effort to blunt continuing criticism over her past claims to have Native American heritage.

The 2020 hopeful, who was born in the city, will meet privately with tribal leaders — where representatives from all of the approximately 40 federally recognized tribes in the state have been invited for the Sunday morning meeting, according to the Washington Post. Later in the day she will hold a town hall meeting.

FOX NEWS POLL: BIDEN STILL LEADS DEMOCRATIC RACE AS WARREN DROPS

The meeting will reportedly focus on Warren’s agenda for the community and is also part of an effort to blunt the criticism she has faced for allegedly appropriating Native American culture.

“Elizabeth is looking forward to meeting with tribal leaders to discuss ways they can continue to work together on many important issues facing Indian Country. She believes in working on a Nation-to-Nation basis to uphold the United States’ solemn trust and treaty obligations to Tribal Nations and to build a brighter future for Indian Country,” a Warren spokeswoman told the outlet.

Warren infuriated Native American leaders last year when she released a DNA test that she said proved her past claims that she has Native American heritage. That claim had been mocked for years by conservatives, and particularly President Trump — who has repeatedly nicknamed her “Pocahontas.”

"Crazy Pocahontas goes to the middle of Central Park, or whatever park, she’s in Manhattan… I mean, I could have Barron Trump go into Central Park and he’d get a crowd that would be just as big," Trump told a rally in Michigan this week. "He’s 13! He’d get a bigger crowd!"

WARREN, 70, REPLIES SHE'D BE THE 'YOUNGEST WOMAN' PRESIDENT WHEN DEBATE TALK TURNS TO AGE

Elizabeth Warren critiques rivals in New Hampshire policy speechVideo

While she initially hailed the DNA test triumphantly as debunking that criticism from conservatives, within weeks she was apologizing to tribal leaders, who said that tribal identity was not dictated by DNA. The campaign has sought to tackle and debunk claims that she gained, or tried to gain, an advantage in her career by claiming to be a member of a minority.

Should she win the Democratic presidential nomination, the Trump campaign will likely push to keep the Native American controversy in the news — and use it to allege that Warren cannot be trusted. Having Native American groups behind her will help Warren push back against such an attack.

The trip to Oklahoma is an important one for Warren, who has made her origin story a key part of her campaign narrative. She regularly tells the story of how, after her father’s heart attack, her mother got her first job at 50 in Sears for minimum wage so the family wouldn’t lose their house.

Warren has remained near the top of the polls since announcing her candidacy but in recent months has struggled as her Medicare-for-all plan came under withering criticism from both Republicans and Democrats, particularly over its cost.

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A Fox News poll published this week showed Warren moving from second to third in the Democratic presidential primary race. She was the favorite of 13 percent of primary voters, compared to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in second place with 20 percent and former Vice President Joe Biden with 30 percent.

Original Article

Warren pops her cork on Buttigieg

closePete Buttigieg's 'wine cave' fundraiser becomes Democrat debate's biggest momentVideo

Pete Buttigieg's 'wine cave' fundraiser becomes Democrat debate's biggest moment

Mayor Pete Buttigieg is attacked by Sen. Elizabeth Warren for holding a fundraiser for wealthy donors in a 'wine cave.' Karl Rove and Donna Brazile react to the night's biggest headlines.

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On the roster: Warren pops her cork on Buttigieg – Pelosi, McConnell showdown looms in New Year – Quack in her heart again
WARREN POPS HER CORK ON BUTTIGIEG
NYT: “Does the road to the White House run through a wine cave? That was the question that electrified the Democratic debate in Los Angeles on Thursday. It was specific, referring to the location of a recent fund-raiser that Pete Buttigieg had held in Napa Valley. But it was also metaphoric, a stand-in for the wider argument among Democrats over pragmatism versus purity, compromise versus idealism, a candidate like Buttigieg or Joe Biden versus a candidate like Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders. As Warren blasted Buttigieg for kissing up to wealthy donors — and he portrayed her as an unpractical hypocrite — they weren’t really sparring over cabernet and cash. They were promoting separate strategies for winning the presidential election, different ways to position their party and vanquish Donald Trump. It was the same conflict that has defined the Democratic primary from the start, but with extra fury. Passions often burn hotter when alcohol is involved.”
Biden surefooted for a change – Politico:“But the most significant story of the most intense, substantive debate of the 2020 Democratic cycle is that Joe Biden – an almost default frontrunner who has managed to stumble at one point or another in each of the past debates—may have finally found his footing in an environment where he has demonstrated persistent discomfort. In a Democratic primary that has often sounded like a battle for the hearts of the progressive blogosphere, with candidates outdoing themselves to spin out the most inclusive, greenest, most redistributed vision of America, Biden has often felt like a throwback—a visitor from Obamaworld and other vanished lands who has trouble parrying attacks from sharper and fresher voices. In Thursday's debate, however, Biden consistently demonstrated the capacity not just to defend himself but to turn that defense into effective arguments for his candidacy.”
Nate Silver: Klobuchar shines – FiveThirtyEight: “I thought this was not only [Amy Klobuchar’s] best debate, but one of the better debates that any Democrat has had so far in the cycle. I say that because she was both pretty good on the substance and smart tactically — going after Buttigieg by emphasizing electability and experience is exactly the strategy I advocated for her at the start of the evening. I don’t know whether we’re going to get a Klobuchar surge — she’s at only at 3 percent nationally so she has a looooong way to go! — but if there’s one in the cards, tonight might have been the catalyst for it.”
Huckabee Sanders apologizes for mocking speech impediment – USA Today: “Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has apologized for a tweet appearing to mock former Vice President Joe Biden when he mentioned children with speech impediments who have asked him for advice because of his own experience with a lifelong stutter during the Democratic debate. ‘There’s not one line I go through that I don’t have at least a half a dozen people come up and hug me and say, ‘Can you help me?…’’ Biden said as he rounded out his debate appearance. ‘The little kid who says, ‘I-I-I-I can’t talk, what do I do?’…’ In a tweet that has since been deleted, Huckabee Sanders said, ‘I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I hhave absolutely no idea what Biden is talking about.’”
Dems nudge up qualifications for January debate – Des Moines Register: “The Democratic National Committee announced Friday that it will ratchet up poll performance and donations criteria for presidential candidates to qualify for the January debate in Iowa. The debate, scheduled for Jan. 14, will be hosted by CNN in partnership with the Des Moines Register and held on the Drake University campus in Des Moines. … To qualify for the January, candidates must have: Received 5% or more support in at least four different polls, which may be national polls or state polls in the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. That’s up from 4% for the December debate, held Thursday night. … [The second qualification:] donations from at least 225,000 total donors and at least 1,000 donors in at least 20 states. That’s up from 200,000 total donors and 800 donors in 20 states for the December debate.”
Bloomberg already boasts biggest early-state staff – McClatchy: “Michael Bloomberg’s presidential campaign has hired more than 200 staffers to work in 21 states, aides told McClatchy, providing the New York billionaire with the largest organization after the early voting states of any 2020 Democratic candidate. Bloomberg, a late entrant into the White House race, finalized a fleet of state leadership hires this week, signing on a cadre of former campaign hands to Barack Obama, past presidential and gubernatorial races and national and state party committees. It means Bloomberg, who is skipping the first four nominating contests in February, now has teams in nine of the 14 Super Tuesday states that vote on March 3, as well as aides in four states that vote in April. The campaign’s beefed up ground game supplement the north of $80 million the former New York City mayor has already spent on TV ads through this week.”
THE RULEBOOK: THE RACE IS ON
“When the States know that the Union can apply itself without their agency, it will be a powerful motive for exertion on their part.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 36
TIME OUT: BIG FUN ON THE BAYOU
Garden&Gun: “Instead of leaving out cookies by the fireplace, Cajun Country welcomes Santa Claus with actual fire—a miles-long row of bonfires on the levees lining the Mississippi River. ‘As children, we were taught it was to light the way for Papa Noël to find his way into the swamplands,’ says John Folse, the heralded chef and author of The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine who grew up in St. James Parish, [Louisiana] the epicenter of the tradition started by early German and French settlers. … Beginning around noon Christmas Eve, families congregated and cooked, lit the fires, and feasted in the glow of roaring flames. Everyone in attendance brought a dish… But the center of the feast was always gumbo. ‘Every bonfire made a different kind,’ Folse says. … As the early Cajun and Creole settlers did before them, when Folse and his family finished their meal, they walked to church for midnight mass, stopping at fires along the way to warm up and chat with neighbors.”
[Ed. note: Well, it’s that time again… This will be the last full installment of the Halftime Report until after Christmas. We will be back a week from Monday in preparation for the beginning of what promises to be an exciting election year. Also, don’t forget to send in your nominations for the Best of Journalism 2019, the winners of which we will announce on Dec. 31. You can send your picks to HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM. More importantly, however, we hope you and your families are positively swimming in peace and joy this holiday season. For our Jewish friends who begin their celebration of Hanukkah on Sunday evening, we wish you Chag Sameach! For our fellow Christians who begin their celebration of on Tuesday evening we wish you the peace that transcends all understanding. And for everyone else, please enjoy the cookies and egg nog.]
Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.
SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 26.2 points (↓ 1.4 points from last wk.)
Sanders: 18.6 points (↑ 0.4 points from last wk.)
Warren: 16.2 points (↓ 2.2 points from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 9.4 points (↑ 0.8 points from last wk.)
Bloomberg: 5.2 points (first listing)
[Averages include: NBC News/WSJ, CNN, Quinnipiac University, USA Today/Suffolk University and NPR/PBS/Marist.]
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 43.8 percent
Average disapproval: 51.4 percent
Net Score: -7.6 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 1.8 points
[Average includes: NBC/WSJ: 44% approve – 54% disapprove; CNBC: 40% approve – 49% disapprove; CNN: 44% approve – 52% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 43% approve – 52% disapprove; USA Today/Suffolk University: 48% approve – 50% disapprove.]
WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT?
You can join Chris and Brianna every day on Fox Nation. Go behind-the-scenes of your favorite political note as they go through the must-read headlines of the day right from their office – with plenty of personality. Click here to sign up and watch!
PELOSI, MCCONNELL SHOWDOWN LOOMS IN NEW YEAR
Bloomberg: “House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell deepened their impasse over the terms of President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Thursday, as Congress left Washington for the holidays without settling when and how it would take place. Pelosi surprised many House Democrats Wednesday night after the House impeached Trump when she said she would delay transmitting the articles of impeachment and naming the impeachment managers — who will argue the House’s case — until the Senate lays out its procedures for the trial. ‘When we see what they have, we’ll know who and how many we will send over,’ Pelosi said at a news conference Thursday. Pelosi cast the timing as a procedural matter and cited the Senate’s ability to come up with a bipartisan trial plan after President Bill Clinton was impeached.”
Turncoat Dem swoons for Trump, pledges his ‘undying support’ – NJ.com: “New Jersey Rep. Jeff Van Drew, who has voted against President Donald Trump 90 percent of the time while in the U.S. House, promised his ‘undying support’ at the White House Thursday for the president as he joined the Republican Party. Democrats weren’t happy. Van Drew switched sides a day after being one of only two House Democrats to vote against impeaching Trump, a Republican, for abuse of power, and one only three who opposed impeaching him for obstruction of Congress. … On Thursday, Van Drew met in the Oval Office with Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and others on Thursday. ‘Two more things I want to say,’ Van Drew said as reporters looked on. ‘One, you have my undying support.’ ‘Thank you,’ Trump said. ‘Thank you very much.’ ‘And always,’ Van Drew said.”
Mulvaney, already marginalized, prepares for departure – Politico: “Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney is widely expected to leave his current position once the Senate wraps up its impeachment trial and the intense scrutiny of the West Wing settles down, according to five aides and confidants to President Donald Trump. Trump allies and White House aides, who have been nudging the president in recent weeks to find a new leader for the team as it delves into a crucial reelection campaign, have been circulating lists of potential replacements for weeks. Mulvaney no longer wields much control over White House staff. Lately, he has been left out of major personnel and policy decisions, and he is not driving the strategy on impeachment even though he occupies what is historically the most powerful job in the West Wing. ‘He is there. I’ll leave it at that,’ said a Republican close to the White House when asked about Mulvaney’s status. ‘He’s like a kid. His role at the dinner table is to be seen and not heard.’”
Christie-backed PAC provides impeachment air cover for GOP senators – Politico: “Chris Christie is launching a big-money effort aimed at giving Senate Republicans air cover on impeachment — and positioning the former New Jersey governor as a counterweight to liberal billionaire Tom Steyer. The newly formed issue advocacy organization, Right Direction America, is set to begin a seven-figure TV and digital advertising offensive Monday. The nonprofit group will be focused on a half-dozen states where key 2020 Senate races are taking place: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Maine and North Carolina. Christie is looking to offset a multimillion-dollar offensive funded by Steyer, a Democratic presidential candidate and hedge fund executive, who is targeting Senate Republicans over impeachment. Steyer’s organization, Need to Impeach, has spent around $3.5 million across a handful of states pressuring GOP senators.”
Trump rages on evangelical magazine after it backs his removal – WaPo: “The evangelical magazine founded by the late Rev. Billy Graham published a surprising editorial Thursday calling for President Trump’s removal and describing him as ‘a near perfect example of a human being who is morally lost and confused.’ ‘Whether Mr. Trump should be removed from office by the Senate or by popular vote next election — that is a matter of prudential judgment,’ said the piece, written by editor in chief Mark Galli. ‘That he should be removed, we believe, is not a matter of partisan loyalties but loyalty to the Creator of the Ten Commandments.’ Galli, who will retire from the magazine Jan. 3, wrote that the facts leading to Wednesday’s impeachment of Trump are unambiguous. … But the editorial didn’t just call out Trump. It called out his devout Christian supporters. … Trump lashed out at the magazine in a pair of early-morning tweets Friday, calling Christianity Today a ‘far left magazine … which has been doing poorly.’”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
North American trade pact passes in the HouseWSJ
Before Christmas recess Senate confirms 12 more Trump judicial nominees Politico
McMorris Rodgers to reimburse Treasury for misused funds after ethics ruling WaPo
Washington state Rep. Matt Shea suspended from GOP caucus for domestic terrorism ties The Seattle Times
Georgia attorneys defend voter purge, 22,000 reinstated to voting rollsAJC
Pompeo has a new deputy, another sign of impending Senate runAP
AUDIBLE: DUDE
“If you want to talk about the capacity to win, try putting together a coalition to bring you back to office with 80% of the vote as a gay dude in Mike Pence’s Indiana.” – Mayor Pete Buttigieg in response to Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s questioning of his experience during Thursday night’s debate.
ANY GIVEN SUNDAY
This weekend Mr. Sunday will sit down with chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, Marc Short. Watch “Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.” Check local listings for broadcast times in your area.
#mediabuzz – Host Howard Kurtz has the latest take on the week’s media coverage. Watch #mediabuzz Sundays at 11 a.m. ET.
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“I’m a retired federal employee. You say [Thursday:] ‘Certainly Republican incumbents would be worried about showing such generosity to one of the most resented classes of American citizens.’ I actually went looking for web results to support this widespread-resentment idea quantitatively, but didn’t find much. It’s not worth it to me to argue, and it wouldn’t surprise me greatly if you’re right, but — how do you know that?” – Steve Tulloss, Ellicott City, Md.
[Ed. note: I won’t share with you some of the other responses that we had about the new paid family leave benefit for federal workers, but suffice it to say that there is a longstanding antipathy toward federal workers, especially on the American right. We weren’t agreeing, just pointing out that the issue has been fraught before. During the Obama administration, pay raises and sometimes pay freezes for federal workers were often big political fights. Here’s a new, very generous benefit enacted without a peep.]
“Could the Republicans in the House file a lawsuit saying this current impeachment does not rise to the level the Constitution requires and ask the Supreme Court to rule? Love reading your report each day!” – Jim Arthur, Seattle
[Ed. note: Nope. There’s no appealing the judgements of the House in an impeachment. The same goes for the Senate in an impeachment trial. Congress’ power in the matter is absolute. Thanks for reading and taking the time to write!]
“What does it say about my Boomer generation that three of the four impeachments of Presidents have occurred in my lifetime?” – Ron Smith, Larned, Kan.
[Ed. note: You guys have certainly played havoc with American politics over the past 50 or so years. If we look at the arc of events from the 1968 election to today, it’s been a doozy. But taken in the longer view, the upheavals of your era have been modest compared to others, so don’t be too hard on yourselves.]
“Sorry to be so old and out of it but in the ‘Impeachment Circus’ piece [Thursday] you wrote JK! LOLZ! What on earth does that mean?” – Bill Newton, Berkeley, Calif.
[Ed. note: No need to apologize, Mr. Newton! The first one is J(ust) K(idding). LOLZ is a variant of L(aughing) O(ut) L(oud). The Z indicates, for some reason, ironic or mocking laughter.]
Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.
QUACK IN HER HEART AGAIN
Bangor [Maine] Daily News: “The ducks brought together by a Tinder-esque singles ad are hitting it off. Yellow Duck has warmed up to the mallard she was introduced to Sunday, said her owner, Chris Morris, who posted a personals ad on a community bulletin board at the Blue Hill Co-op last week seeking a companion for his lonely duck. ‘… At first she was a little wary of him, but now they follow each other around everywhere.’ Morris posted the ad because Yellow Duck appeared to be feeling blue after a bobcat snatched her two fellow ducks from the Morris’ yard on Dry Moon Lane about three weeks ago. ‘Duck seeking duck,” Morris wrote in the ad. “Lonesome runner duck seeks companion. Partner recently deceased. Serious replies only.’ … The Morris’ named their new duck Mr. Graham… The moniker is an homage to Aubrey Graham, the rapper known as Drake, which is also the term used to describe male ducks that are sexually mature.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“Over the past hundred years, Americans have elected 13 Republican Administrations and 12 Democratic ones. Power could not be more evenly divided. American presidential elections are essentially a flip of the coin. This time the coin landed on its edge.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in Time magazine on Nov. 20, 2000.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article

Warren, 70, replies she’d be ‘youngest woman’ president when debate talk turns to age

closePundits say Warren slippingVideo

Pundits say Warren slipping

Medicare plan finally draws spotlight.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., seemed to turn a potentially troublesome fact to her advantage during Thursday night's Democratic primary debate in Los Angeles, when the conversation turned to the ages of the candidates.

“Senator Warren, you would be the oldest president ever inaugurated," moderator Tim Alberta of Politico magazine noted. "I’d like you to weigh in as well."

“I’d also be the youngest woman ever inaugurated,” Warren answered, drawing applause from the audience at Loyola Marymount University.

DEM DEBATE ERUPTS AS CANDIDATES SPAR OVER DONORS; YANG SLAMS TRUMP 'OBSESSION'

The age topic has been a touchy one for several of the 2020 Democrats, with septuagenarians Bernie Sanders (78), Joe Biden and Michael Bloomberg (both 77) and Warren (70) competing for the party's nomination against younger rivals Tom Steyer (62), Amy Klobuchar (59), Cory Booker (50), Andrew Yang (44), Tulsi Gabbard (38) and Pete Buttigieg (37).

Of the younger group, only Buttigieg has managed to rank among the top-tier contenders, meaning that President Trump (73) could very likely face a fellow septuagenarian in the general election next November.

During her response, Warren also said she has posed for more than 100,000 selfies on the campaign trail so far – asserting it proves she has been connecting with average Americans. The comment appeared to be a subtle dig at rivals Biden and Buttigieg, who reportedly charge hefty sums to pose for photos.

Warren also addressed recent comments made by former President Obama, who said women were “indisputably better” leaders than men. Warren said she thought Obama was speaking about power in America.

Democratic presidential candidates spar, face impeachment questions on debate stageVideo

"I believe he’s talking about women and people of color and trans people and people whose voices just so often get shoved out,” Warren said. “For me, the best way to understand that is to look how people are running their campaigns in 2020.”

“I made the decisions, when I decided to run, not to do business as usual, and now I’m crowding in on 100,000 selfies. That’s 100,000 hugs and handshakes and stories. Stories from people who are struggling with student loan debt. Stories from people who can’t pay their medical bills. Stories from people who can’t find child care.

Democratic presidential candidates weigh in on Trump impeachment ahead of debateVideo

“Most of the people on this stage run a traditional campaign. And that means going back and forth from coast to coast to rich people and people who can put up 5,000 bucks or more in order to have a picture taken, in order to have a conversation. And in order maybe to be considered an ambassador … ”

Warren has repeatedly called out Biden and Buttigieg for accepting money from super PACs and billionaires, while her own campaign, as well as that of fellow progressive Sanders, claims to be grass-roots funded.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

In the most pointed exchange, Warren zeroed in on Buttigieg's recent private meeting with wealthy donors inside a California “wine cave."

Buttigieg, whose recent surge has been attributed in part to his fundraising success, said Democrats shouldn’t go against Trump with “with one hand tied behind our back." Trump’s reelection campaign has reportedly accumulated hundreds of millions of dollars.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Buttigieg calls out Warren for fundraiser attack: ‘Your net worth is 100 times mine’

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The on-going feud between top-tier Democratic presidential nomination rivals Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg over top-dollar donations went from the campaign trail to the primetime primary debate stage on Thursday night.

Warren – who has eschewed fundraisers with top-dollar donors during her presidential bid as she instead focuses nearly entirely on small-dollar grassroots contributions – slammed Buttigieg for holding big bucks fundraisers. Buttigieg quickly shot back that he was the only candidate on the stage who’s net worth isn’t in the millions.

HOLDING BACK NO MORE, WARREN SLAMS TOP TIER RIVALS

The verbal fist-fight kicked off with Warren taking aim at two of her top-tier rivals – Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden.

“Most of the people on this stage run a traditional campaign and that means going back and forth from coast to coast to rich people and people who can put up $5,000 or more in order to have a picture taken … and in order maybe to be considered an ambassador,” Warren emphasized.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, speaks as South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg listens during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, speaks as South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg listens during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Buttigieg responded by pointing to President Trump’s vast re-election campaign war chest, saying, “They’ve already put together more than $300 million … This is our only chance to defeat Donald Trump and we shouldn’t try to do it with one hand tied behind our back.”

Defending his mingling with top-dollar donors, Buttigieg added that “I’m not going to turn away anyone who wants to help us defeat Donald Trump.”

Warren shot back – highlighting that Buttigieg recently held a fundraiser “that was held in a wine cave full of crystals and served $900 a bottle wine.”

“Billionaires in wine caves should not pick the next president of the United States,” she stressed.

Firing back, Buttigieg said, “I’m literally the only person on this stage who’s not a millionaire or a billionaire.”

“This is the problem with issuing purity tests you cannot yourself pass,” Buttigieg added. “Senator, your net worth is 100 times mine.”

“I do not sell access to my time,” Warren responded. “I don’t meet behind closed doors with big-dollar donors.”

Buttigieg counter attacked, noting that Warren transferred millions of dollars to her presidential campaign that she initially raised at big bucks fundraisers during her 2018 Senate re-election bid.

“Your presidential campaign right now, as we speak, is funded in part by money you transferred having raised it at those exact same big ticket fundraisers you now denounce,” Buttigieg stated. “Did it corrupt you, senator? Of course not.”

The verbal fireworks between the two candidates is the latest chapter in their recent feud.

Thanks to repeated pressure from Warren, Buttigieg a week ago announced that he would open up his closed-door fundraisers to media coverage, similar to what the Biden campaign has done this election cycle.

And Buttigieg's campaign returned fire, urging Warren to release her tax returns from before 2008, when she had corporate clients similar to the giant corporations she now rails against. Warren — under pressure — announced that she earned nearly $2 million from private legal work since 1986.

Warren’s increased aggressiveness in going after her top-tier rivals comes as the one-time co-front-runner in the Democratic nomination race has seen her poll numbers deteriorate the past month in national surveys and, more importantly, in polls in New Hampshire and Iowa, the states that kicks off the primary and caucus presidential nominating calendar.

Original Article

AOC, Sanders, Warren back legislation seen as ‘first step’ towards decriminalizing sex work

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 17

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 17 are here. Check out what’s clicking on Foxnews.com

Prominent progressives are calling for additional scrutiny over anti-sex trafficking legislation by supporting a House bill which is seen by its sponsor as a potential first step to decriminalizing sex work.

The SAFE SEX Workers Study Act, sponsored by Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., would study the effects of two anti-sex trafficking bills — the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act and the Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act [SESTA/FOSTA] — that became law last year. Opponents say the new law makes consensual sex work more difficult. According to Khanna’s office, the law has forced sex workers off of online platforms and into more dangerous situations.

“Sex workers have relied on such internet platforms to screen clients and negotiate boundaries for consensual, transactional sex services, including condom use and other harm reduction strategies,” Khanna said in a press release on Tuesday,

“While SESTA/FOSTA was intended to curb online sex trafficking, by banning the ‘promotion of prostitution,’ a host of internet platforms relied on by sex workers have shut down,” he added.

IS THE ONLINE SEX TRAFFICKING ERA ABOUT TO MEET THE ‘DELETE’ KEY?

Khanna’s legislation has received support from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. — all of whom have expressed openness to decriminalization. According to the release, Sanders is an original co-sponsor. The bill, introduced on Tuesday, also received backing from Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chair Pramilia Jayapal, D-Wa., and Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich.

While the release didn’t specifically call for decriminalizing sex work, Khanna’s office confirmed that the congressman saw the study as a “first step” towards decriminalization.

KAMALA HARRIS CALLS FOR DECRIMINALIZING SEX WORK, INSISTS TRUMP IS RACIST

A spokesperson for Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, who sponsored the original legislation, suggested the study would help facilitate illegal activity.

“We have no interest in doing a study on how to facilitate any further illegal activity,” spokesperson Emmalee Kalmbach told Fox News.

Portman defended the legislation in a statement provided to Fox News.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Passage of SESTA was an important milestone and hard-fought victory for the victims and survivors of online sex trafficking. In this century, in this country, no man, woman, or child should be subjected to sex trafficking,” he said.

“Thanks to the enactment [of] SESTA, prosecutors can now go after these online traffickers, victims of this abhorrent crime can now have their day in court, and websites that knowingly facilitate sex trafficking are being shut down and being held liable for their actions.”

Spokespersons for Sanders, Warren, and Ocasio-Cortez did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Original Article

Fox News Poll: Biden still leads Democratic race as Warren drops

closeOne-term plan? Biden denies talking to aides about re-electionVideo

One-term plan? Biden denies talking to aides about re-election

Former Vice President Joe Biden denies planning for one-term presidency; Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy reports.

Former Vice President Joe Biden remains Democratic primary voters’ preferred presidential candidate, as a Fox News Poll released Sunday shows more think he is capable of beating President Trump than feel that way about any of his main competitors — and he performs best in potential 2020 matchups. In addition, Biden has the largest number of Democrats, as well as voters overall, saying his positions on the issues are “about right.”

Seventy-seven percent of Democratic primary voters think Biden can beat Trump in next year’s presidential election, up from 68 percent in October. Smaller majorities say the same about Bernie Sanders (60 percent), Elizabeth Warren (59 percent), and Mike Bloomberg (55 percent). Forty-eight percent think Pete Buttigieg can win — an 18-point jump from 30 percent in October.

More Democratic primary voters think Biden’s “about right” on issues (64 percent) than Buttigieg (56 percent), Warren (53 percent), Sanders (49 percent), and Bloomberg (47 percent). Seventy-eight percent of Republicans say Trump’s positions are “about right.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE POLL RESULTS

Running down the Democratic race: Biden leads with 30 percent, followed by Sanders at 20 percent. Warren returns to third with 13 percent, down from a high of 22 percent in October.

Next, it’s Buttigieg (7 percent), Bloomberg and Amy Klobuchar (5 percent each), Tulsi Gabbard and Andrew Yang (3 percent apiece), and Cory Booker (2 percent). The remaining candidates garner 1 percent or less.

Biden’s lead comes mostly from voters ages 45 and over (up by 26 points), moderates/conservatives (+20), and non-whites (+13). Sanders wins among voters under 35 (+19) and white men (+1).

But don’t place any bets just yet. Nearly half of those currently backing a candidate, 49 percent, say they could change their mind.

"Biden's support has been the consistent feature of this race," says Republican pollster Daron Shaw, who conducts the Fox News Poll with Democrat Chris Anderson. "It's time for consultants and pundits to seriously consider the possibility his backers aren’t simply being strategic and may be more committed than we heretofore suspected."

Sanders and Warren have experienced fairly significant swings in support, while Biden’s numbers have barely budged since March, staying between 29-35 percent. At the same time, his current 10-point edge over Sanders is down from a 19-point lead in June.

Democratic primary voters divide when choosing between a candidate who will “restore the political system” to the way it was before Trump (48 percent) and one who will “fundamentally change how the political system works” (45 percent).

Those wanting to restore the system go for Biden (39 percent) over Sanders (14 percent) and Warren (11 percent). Those wanting big changes put Sanders (26 percent) and Biden (23 percent) on top, while Warren trails (14 percent).

Fewer Democratic primary voters are satisfied with their field of candidates now (63 percent) than were in late October (69 percent). Since then, Bloomberg and Deval Patrick joined the race, while Steve Bullock, Kamala Harris and Joe Sestak dropped out.

Since late October, support for Warren is down across the board, with the notable declines among those with a college degree (-13 points), those ages 45+ (-12), and women (-11 points).

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“The most likely explanation for Warren’s drop is some primary voters souring on 'Medicare-for-all',” says Anderson. “The issue could be a real drag for the Democratic nominee in the general election. The more it’s debated, the more voters who care most about beating Trump seem to realize her push for 'Medicare -for-all' is bad politics at this moment in time.”

Currently, 54 percent of Democratic primary voters favor moving to a government-run system in lieu of private health insurance, down from a high of 65 percent in October. Large numbers like the idea of allowing every American to buy into Medicare if they want (78 percent) and making minor changes to Obamacare (67 percent).

Among all voters, majorities favor "Medicare-for-all" who want it (66 percent) and Obamacare (53 percent). Over half (53 percent) oppose an entirely government-run health care system. In addition, 68 percent favor Warren’s proposed 2 percent “wealth tax,” including 83 percent of Democrats and 51 percent of Republicans.

About 4 voters in 10 think Biden’s (42 percent), Buttigieg’s (37 percent), and Trump’s (39 percent) positions on the issues are “about right,” while over half think Sanders’ (56 percent) and Warren’s positions (52 percent) are “too liberal.”

In hypothetical head-to-heads, Biden tops Trump by 48-41 percent and has the only lead outside the poll’s margin of sampling error.

However, Biden’s 7-point lead is his narrowest since March; this is the first time he’s been below 50 percent since July, and Trump’s 41 percent support is a record high for him in a ballot test against the former vice president.

Sanders is preferred over Trump by six points (49-43) and Bloomberg is ahead by five (45-40). Warren (46-45) and Buttigieg (43-42) are each up by one point.

Biden’s advantage over Trump is driven largely by double-digit leads among women (+15 points) and non-whites (+36). Whites with a college degree go for Biden by 6 points, while whites without a degree back Trump by 12. Rural whites prefer Trump over Biden by 18 points, while suburban women favor Biden by 21.

The electorate is paying attention: 58 percent of voters are extremely interested in the presidential election, including 64 percent of Democrats and 55 percent of Republicans. At this point in the election cycle four years ago, far fewer, 32 percent of voters, said they were extremely interested (November 2015).

Conducted December 8-11, 2019, under the joint direction of Beacon Research (D) and Shaw & Company (R), this Fox News Poll includes interviews with 1,000 randomly chosen registered voters nationwide who spoke with live interviewers on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points for all registered voters and 4.5 points for Democratic primary voters (453).

Original Article

Buttigieg releases list of campaign fundraisers after criticism from Warren

closeDemocrats falling out of love with Pete ButtigiegVideo

Democrats falling out of love with Pete Buttigieg

Reaction and analysis from radio show host Howie Carr.

Presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg’s campaign on Friday released a list of people who have raised $25,000 or more for his campaign, amid continued scrutiny from his Democratic primary rivals.

The list is something that the South Bend, Ind. mayor's campaign claims make it “more transparent than any other campaign this cycle.” It includes names such as Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., while Politico reported that other names include an executive vice chairman of the private equity company Blackstone and a partner of McKinsey and Co. — a consulting firm where Buttigieg used to work.

“In addition to releasing these names, which no other current campaign has done, Pete has also opened his fundraisers to the press,” the campaign said in a statement. “He has made public 12 years of tax returns, he has held three multi-day bus tours with reporters that were completely on the record, and he has committed to restoring daily press briefings in the White House.”

BUTTIGIEG RELEASES LIST OF CLIENTS FROM 2007-10 CONSULTING WORK

Politico also reported that a number of former fundraisers for both Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama are on the list.

The release comes amid blistering criticism from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who has taken aim at Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden — without naming them directly — for mingling with wealthy donors.

"They are spending their time in fundraisers with high-dollar donors, selling access to their time for money. Some of them have spent months blocking reporters from entering those fancy, closed-door affairs,” she said at an event this week.

HOLDING BACK NO MORE, WARREN SLAMS TOP RIVALS BIDEN AND BUTTIGIEG

Elizabeth Warren critiques rivals in New Hampshire policy speechVideo

And pointing to Buttigieg, again without naming him, she said the candidate “calls the people who raise a quarter-million dollars for him his ‘National Investors Circle,’ and he offers them regular phone calls and special access. When a candidate brags about how beholden he feels to a group of wealthy investors, our democracy is in serious trouble.”

Following Warren’s address, the Buttigieg campaign returned fire.

“Senator Warren's idea of how to defeat Donald Trump is to tell people who don’t support her that they are unwelcome in the fight and that those who disagree with her belong in the other party. We need to move beyond the politics and divisiveness that is tearing this country apart and holding us back,” Buttigieg senior advisor Lis Smith said in a statement.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Buttigieg has also faced criticism from the left for an alleged lack of transparency about his work for McKinsey. He responded last week by releasing a summary of his work there and called on the company to release him from the nondisclosure agreement he had signed. It later did, and Buttigieg released a list of clients for whom he had worked.

His clients from 2007 to 2010 included Michigan Blue Cross Blue Shield, Canadian grocery store and retail chain Loblaw’s, Best Buy; the NRDC, EPA and Department of Energy, together, for an energy project; environmental nonprofit the Energy Foundation, the Department of Defense working on building the economies of Irag and Afghanistan, and the U.S. Postal Service.

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser and Morgan Phillips contributed to this report.

Original Article

Biden slams Warren, claims she’d rule by ‘executive order,’ refuse to work with GOP to unite country if elected

closeCould Biden take 2020 if he promised to only serve one term?Video

Could Biden take 2020 if he promised to only serve one term?

'The Daily Briefing' host Dana Perino reacts to the Biden campaign's bold strategy.

Former Vice President Joe Biden said Thursday that Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., would take the unorthodox approach of ruling “by executive order,” if elected president after she scoffed at the idea of working together with Republicans to unite the country on a slew of her progressive policy proposals.

Top-tier Democratic rivals have begun swiping at each other amid tightening polls ahead of February's presidential primary and caucus in New Hampshire and Iowa, respectively, when the 2020 election season — and the battle to take on President Trump next November — gets underway in earnest.

HOLDING BACK NO MORE, WARREN SLAMS TOP RIVALS BIDEN AND BUTTIGIEG

Biden, who trailed Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in a University of California at Berkeley poll released this week, made the remarks about Warren at a fundraiser in the San Francisco Bay Area — one of three such events he had scheduled for the day in one of the Democratic Party's stronghold regions. He took aim at Warren without mentioning her by name.

“I read a speech by one of my — good person — one of my opponents, saying that, you know, 'Biden says we’re going to have to work with Republicans to get stuff passed,’” Biden said in Palo Alto. “I thought, ‘Well, OK — how are you going to do it, by executive order?’”

“This particular person said, ‘He thinks he can actually unify the country. You can’t unify the country.’ Well, guys, if we can’t unify the country you all ought to go home now, because nothing’s going to happen except by executive order,” Biden continued.

“And last time I knew it, a president is not allowed to say, ‘This is how I’m changing the tax structure; this is how I’m changing the environment.’ … You need to actually get a consensus in the constitutional process,” Biden said. “And we can unify the country.”

"Last time I knew it, a president is not allowed to say, ‘This is how I’m changing the tax structure; this is how I’m changing the environment.’ … You need to actually get a consensus in the constitutional process.”

— Joe Biden

Biden seemed to react to a comment made earlier in the day in New Hampshire by Warren who — also without naming her targets – took aim at Biden before refocusing her remarks on an opponent they have in common, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

“We know that one Democratic candidate walked into a room of wealthy donors this year to promise that ‘nothing would fundamentally change’ if he’s elected president,” Warren said of Biden during her address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

Referring to Buttigieg, she continued: “Unlike some candidates for the Democratic nomination, I’m not betting my agenda on the naive hope that if Democrats adopt Republican critiques of progressive policies or make vague calls for unity, that somehow the wealthy and well-connected will stand down.”

Elizabeth Warren critiques rivals in New Hampshire policy speechVideo

Warren — who has eschewed fundraisers with top-dollar donors during her presidential bid as she instead focuses nearly entirely on small-dollar grassroots contributions — once again criticized Biden and Buttigieg for mingling with wealthy donors.

Though ranking third in California, Biden remains the narrow Democratic front-runner in national polls, according to the Mercury News of San Jose. Biden also is capitalizing on big-money donors in Silicon Valley after their home-state Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., dropped out of the primary race, according to a report in Politico this week.

On Thursday, Biden appeared at an event at the home of Sarah and Greg Sands, founder of the venture capital firm Costanoa Ventures. He then attended a fundraiser in San Francisco hosted by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and her husband, financier Richard Blum, before heading to a third event across the city hosted by attorney Joe Cotchett, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Biden took heat from Warren and Sanders in October for forming a super PAC to accept unlimited donations from billionaires and corporate elites to cure his fundraising woes. He had previously promised not to accept super PAC donations when he first announced his candidacy in April.

According to the Federal Election Commission, Biden raised $38 million from April through September. That figure means Biden falls in fifth place when it comes to fundraising dollars among Democratic presidential candidates. He has only raised about half as much as Sanders, who does not accept super PAC donations.

Biden’s campaign also has struggled with shortcomings in available cash on hand. The most recent federal fundraising report said he has just $8 million in cash on hand compared to Sanders’ $33 million, Warren’s $25 million and Buttigieg’s $23 million.

Democrats are also now contending with the seemingly limitless potential funding of campaign newcomer Michael Bloomberg, a multibillionaire who joined the race in late November — though the former New York City mayor has struggled in the polls.

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser and Tara Prindiville contributed to this report.

Original Article

Holding back no more, Warren slams top rivals Biden and Buttigieg

closeQuestions mount as Elizabeth Warren slips in national pollsVideo

Questions mount as Elizabeth Warren slips in national polls

Did Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren's gamble on Medicare for all fail? Reaction and analysis from former Republican Congressman Connie Mack and Fox News contributor Jessica Tarlov.

MANCHESTER, N.H. – In some of Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s most pointed remarks in her nearly year-long bid for the White House, the Democratic presidential candidate — who in recent weeks has seen her poll numbers slip — fired away on Thursday at two of her top-tier rivals for her party’s nomination.

And while she didn’t name names, it was crystal clear the progressive senator was taking aim at the two leading center-left candidates — former Vice President Joe Biden and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

WARREN SHAKES UP CAMPAIGN ROUTINE AS POLL NUMBERS SLIP

“No other candidate has put out anything close to my sweeping plan to root out Washington corruption," the Massachusetts Democrat touted as she gave a major address on the issue in New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

“Unlike some candidates for the Democratic nomination, I'm not counting on Republican politicians having an epiphany and suddenly supporting the kinds of tax increases on the rich or big business accountability that they have opposed under Democratic presidents for a generation,” Warren said in her speech.

The comment was an indirect jab at Biden, who has repeatedly highlighted on the campaign trail that if elected, he can work with Republicans to reach compromise.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts gives an address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, on Dec. 12, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts gives an address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, on Dec. 12, 2019

Warren also took aim at Biden and Buttigieg over their repeated attacks on her push for a government-run "Medicare-for-all" health care system, as well as other progressive policies the populist senator has pushed as she runs for the White House.

“Unlike some candidates for the Democratic nomination, I'm not betting my agenda on the naive hope that if Democrats adopt Republican critiques of progressive policies or make vague calls for unity that somehow the wealthy and well-connected will stand down,” Warren said during her address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

WARREN PUSHES BACK ON NEW ANALYSIS THAT MATH ON HER WEALTH TAX DOESN'T ADD UP

Warren — who has eschewed fundraisers with top-dollar donors during her presidential bid as she instead focuses nearly entirely on small-dollar grassroots contributions — once again criticized Biden and Buttigieg for mingling with wealthy donors.

"They are spending their time in fundraisers with high-dollar donors, selling access to their time for money. Some of them have spent months blocking reporters from entering those fancy, closed-door affairs,” she said.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

And pointing to Buttigieg without naming him, she said the candidate “calls the people who raise a quarter-million dollars for him his ‘National Investors Circle,’ and he offers them regular phone calls and special access. When a candidate brags about how beholden he feels to a group of wealthy investors, our democracy is in serious trouble.”

Asked after her speech if she’s the only Democratic White House hopeful who can fix what she says is a broken system of government, the senator — again pointing to her rivals — told reporters: "We know how bad the problems are right now. No one is proposing the kinds of solutions that address those problems."

The increased aggressiveness in going after her top-tier rivals appears to be part of Warren’s shaking up of her routine, which also includes altering her format on the campaign trail to include more interaction with voters. The moves come as the one-time co-front-runner in the Democratic nomination race has seen her poll numbers deteriorate the past month in national surveys and, more importantly, in polls in New Hampshire and Iowa, the state that kicks off the primary and caucus presidential nominating calendar.

Thanks to repeated pressure from Warren in recent days, Buttigieg announced on Sunday that he would open up his closed-door fundraisers to media coverage, similar to what the Biden campaign has done this election cycle.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Following Warren’s address, the Buttigieg campaign returned fire.

“Senator Warren's idea of how to defeat Donald Trump is to tell people who don’t support her that they are unwelcome in the fight and that those who disagree with her belong in the other party. We need to move beyond the politics and divisiveness that is tearing this country apart and holding us back,” Buttigieg senior advisor Lis Smith said in a statement.

Fox News reached out to Biden’s campaign, but they declined to respond to Warren’s criticisms.

Original Article

Biden rebound continues, Warren falls to third

closeJoe Biden rebounds, Pete Buttigieg knocks Elizabeth Warren to third in new pollVideo

Joe Biden rebounds, Pete Buttigieg knocks Elizabeth Warren to third in new poll

New national Quinnipiac poll finds billionaire Michael Bloomberg is starting toward the bottom with 3 percent national support; Peter Doocy reports from Des Moines, Iowa.

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On the roster: Biden rebound continues, Warren falls to third – Inspector general scathes FBI – Audible: Slam what now? – Axe yourself why
BIDEN REBOUND CONTINUES, WARREN FALLS TO THIRD

Quinnipiac University: “In the Democratic primary race for president, former Vice President Joe Biden is in the best position that he has been since the end of the summer, with 29 percent of the vote among Democratic voters and independent voters who lean Democratic, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released [Tuesday]. Biden is followed by Sen. Bernie Sanders with 17 percent, Sen. Elizabeth Warren with 15 percent, and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg with 9 percent. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has 5 percent, businessman Andrew Yang receives 4 percent, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar gets 3 percent. No other candidate tops 2 percent. In a November 26 poll, Biden received 24 percent, Buttigieg got 16 percent, Warren had 14 percent, and Sanders got 13 percent.”
Head-to-heads show Dems with steady, decisive advantage – Quinnipiac University: “If the general election for president were being held today, 51 percent of registered voters say they would vote for Joe Biden, while 42 percent say they would vote for President Trump. When Trump is matched against other Democratic contenders the race remains in single digits: Bernie Sanders gets 51 percent, while Trump has 43 percent; Elizabeth Warren receives 50 percent and Trump gets 43 percent; Michael Bloomberg gets 48 percent to Trump's 42 percent; Pete Buttigieg has 48 percent, while Trump receives 43 percent; Amy Klobuchar receives 47 percent, while Trump has 43 percent.”
Buttigieg leads in another New Hampshire poll – WBUR: “Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and former Vice President Joe Biden are leading the crowded Democratic presidential primary race in New Hampshire, according to a new WBUR poll. With the first-in-the-nation primary less than nine weeks away, Buttigieg is running slightly ahead of Biden, followed by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is in fourth place. … According to the WBUR survey (topline, crosstabs) of 442 likely New Hampshire Democratic primary voters, 18% say Buttigieg is their top choice. … His rise to the top of the field in the Granite State has come as support for Warren appears to have slipped. Both are competing for highly educated voters, so it's not surprising they are now taking shots at each other.”
Biden considers making single-term pledge – Politico: “Former Vice President Joe Biden’s top advisers and prominent Democrats outside the Biden campaign have recently revived a long-running debate whether Biden should publicly pledge to serve only one term, with Biden himself signaling to aides that he would serve only a single term. While the option of making a public pledge remains available, Biden has for now settled on an alternative strategy: quietly indicating that he will almost certainly not run for a second term while declining to make a promise that he and his advisers fear could turn him into a lame duck and sap him of his political capital. According to four people who regularly talk to Biden … it is virtually inconceivable that he will run for reelection in 2024, when he would be the first octogenarian president. ‘If Biden is elected,’ a prominent adviser to the campaign said, ‘he’s going to be 82 years old in four years and he won’t be running for reelection.’”
Biden won’t back up campaign diversity claims – Politico: “Former Vice President Joe Biden claims to have ‘the most diverse staff of anybody running’ but his campaign won't prove it. Biden made the sweeping assertion in an interview with NPR this week while campaigning in Iowa. But when presented with staff diversity figures from other campaigns, Biden's campaign declined to release its own numbers. Jamal Brown, Biden’s national press secretary, emailed a statement that did not address the question but instead emphasized Biden’s support among voters of color. The campaigns of Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, and Bernie Sanders’ campaigns all said that about 40 percent of their full-time campaign employees are people of color. … The Biden campaign's refusal to provide evidence backing the former vice president’s claim could provide an opening for his rivals to attack his veracity, as candidates work to create contrasts and score points ahead of the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses.”
Yang qualifies for December debate, stage likely set at seven – NPR: “Businessman Andrew Yang has qualified for the sixth Democratic primary debate next week. The upstart entrepreneur and nonprofit executive becomes the seventh — and likely final — candidate to make the Dec. 19 debate cut. He reached the polling threshold after a Quinnipiac University poll was released Tuesday. Yang will join former Vice President Joe Biden, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, billionaire businessman Tom Steyer and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren in the PBS NewsHour/Politico debate at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. The Asian American candidate also brings some needed diversity to the debate stage amid criticism that the event could feature only white candidates after California Sen. Kamala Harris, who had already qualified, dropped out last week.”
THE RULEBOOK: IMPETUOUS VORTEX, INDEED
“The legislative department is everywhere extending the sphere of its activity, and drawing all power into its impetuous vortex.” – James Madison, Federalist No. 48
TIME OUT: HAPPY HANUKKAH, Y’ALL
Garden & Gun: “April McGreger, who for eleven years ran the beloved pickle and preserve business Farmer’s Daughter outside of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is in a mixed marriage. She was raised a Christian in Mississippi. Her husband, the illustrator Phil Blank, grew up in a Jewish family in Pennsylvania. Anyone who has been in one of those relationships knows that cooking for two sets of holidays can bring on what McGreger calls ‘celebratory cooking overload.’ The cultural crush can be even more difficult when a Southern cook who made her name with hyperlocal products such as Bradford watermelon rind pickles and scuppernong chutney wades into hundreds of years of Eastern European culinary tradition. All of this helps explain why McGreger will spend Hanukkah frying dozens of sweet potato latkes for her husband’s extended family. … She hopes sweet potato latkes will help her son stay close to his Southern roots.”
Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.
SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 27.6 points (↑ 1.6 points from last wk.)
Warren: 18.4 points (↓ 1 point from last wk.)
Sanders: 18.2 points (↑ 1 point from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 8.6 points (↓ 1.6 points from last wk.)
[Averages include: Quinnipiac University, Monmouth University, CNN, NBC News/WSJ and ABC News/WaPo.]
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 43.4 percent
Average disapproval: 53 percent
Net Score: -9.6 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 0.2 points
[Average includes: Quinnipiac University: 41% approve – 55% disapprove; Monmouth University: 46% approve – 52% disapprove; CNN: 43% approve – 53% disapprove; NPR/PBS/Marist: 44% approve – 51% disapprove; Gallup: 43% approve – 54% disapprove.]
WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT?
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INSPECTOR GENERAL SCATHES FBI
Fox News: “Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz on Wednesday decried what he called ‘failure’ by the entire ‘chain of command’ involved in the FBI’s initial Trump-Russia investigation, saying they made ‘so many basic and fundamental errors’ on ‘one of the most sensitive FBI investigations.’ Horowitz appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday to testify on his report on the origins of the FBI’s Russia investigation and alleged misconduct related to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). He also criticized FBI leadership for the ‘inaccuracies’ and ‘omissions’ in their FISA applications for former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page, among other things. ‘We are deeply concerned that so many basic and fundamental errors were made by three separate, hand-picked investigative teams; on one of the most sensitive FBI investigations; after the matter had been briefed to the highest levels within the FBI; even though the information sought through the use of FISA authority related so closely to an ongoing presidential campaign’ … Horowitz said in his opening statement before the committee.”
Senate GOP may skip impeachment witnesses altogether – WashEx: “Senate Republicans do not expect to call witnesses President Trump might want to hear from most in an impeachment trial, conceding there are not the votes to summon key figures such as Hunter Biden and the unidentified government whistleblower whose complaint sparked the process. Senate impeachment rules require a majority vote to call witnesses, and with just two out of 53 votes to spare, there is no ‘appetite’ among Republicans to pursue testimony from people that Democrats blocked Republicans from subpoenaing during the House investigation. Indeed, Republicans might forgo calling witnesses altogether, saying minds are made up on Trump’s guilt or innocence and that testimony at trial on the Senate floor would draw out the proceedings unnecessarily. ‘Here’s what I want to avoid: this thing going on longer than it needs to,’ Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told the Washington Examiner. ‘I want to end this.’”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
Trump to sign executive order targeting anti-Semitism on college campusesNYT
Trump paid $2 million in damages for misuse of charity fundsWaPo
AUDIBLE: SLAM WHAT NOW?
“We put it in, slam it in the oven, take it out and there it is — get Brexit done.” – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson campaigning at a caterer as pies were being made on the eve of Thursday’s parliamentary elections.
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“My wife wants to give a generous donation to Biden, believing Biden to be the weakest candidate. I keep waiting for Warren and Sanders to forge an alliance that would vault one of them into ‘first place’ with a combined 35% backing of Democrat voters. What are your thoughts? Can Liz and Bernie make peace with one another (probably with Warren at the top of the ticket) and win the contest to be the Democrat nominee?” – Lois and Jack Conrad, Thousand Oaks, Calif.
[Ed. note: I will say this for you guys: You’ve elevated strategic voting to the next level! As for your second question, I think any such alliance to be highly unlikely. There’s real antipathy there. Remember that people treat adversaries better than heretics. Sanders is pretty clearly banking on taking his fight to Milwaukee. As for the matter of where to make a donation to do the most harm to Democratic chances, I would only remind you of all the Republicans who voted for Barack Obama in 2008 primaries on the grounds that it would weaken Hillary Clinton or deliver an Obama nomination, making it easier for the GOP. The future is not a straight-line projection, certainly when it comes to politics.]
“During the past few ‘I'll Tell You What’ podcasts, I've had the delightful experience of taking in (and laughing roundly at) the recap of Dana's take on and your reaction to her pronunciation of the word ‘raccoon.’ I missed the original episode the first time around, but I'm heartily glad I have experienced the highlight reel the second. Dana's blueblood-ish pronunciation made me think of a pet belonging to the nouveau riche summering in Newport in an Edith Wharton novel (not that I believe the Vanderbilt’s would have ever made social calls with raccoons in tow). Yours was the pragmatic take: RAC-coon. As a native Tennesseean, I can tell you our pronunciation draws out both syllables equally and longer with a bit more liquid in the second vowel sound: rac-cooon. Regardless, I think we all know what's to be done when it's confirmed there's a raccoon out back somewhere.” – Cari Shanks, Argyle, Texas (by way of Cleveland, Tenn.)
[Ed. note: But did you know that the Coolidges kept a pet raccoon at the White House? Maybe not the cottages at Newport, but pretty darned swishy for a ringtail!]
“I want to commend you for writing a courageous and uplifting article in Monday’s Halftime Report. You are right, that the world is not addicted to the awful, but to the hopeful. It seems nowadays that the media at large seems to have taken the old adage ‘if it bleeds, it leads,’ and pushed it to our breaking point. … I think the remedy is in part one that you constantly (in a good way) proclaim, that the news needs to be more local, as does the politics. Yet in this information (overload) age, I don’t see how that will ever be a profitable venture.” – Joshua A. Biggs, Susanville, Calif.
[Ed. note: I so much wish I knew the answer to that conundrum. And I promise that if I knew it, I would be out there doing it. We are watching now as the new owners of Gannett, the largest newspaper publisher in the land, looks for another $300 million in cuts. One suggestion on the table is loosening anti-trust restrictions to allow news outlets to collectively bargain with social media providers on rates, etc. But given the demand, I have to believe someone is going to find a new way to make it work. I just hope they hurry! ]
Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.
AXE YOURSELF WHY
WFTS: “A middle school in Manatee County evacuated its students after someone sprayed too much Axe body spray. According to school officials, the bus carrying Buffalo Creek Middle School students had to remove students off the bus because of the strong odor. The bus stopped at the intersection of 119th Avenue East and Erie Road near Parrish. Another bus arrived at the smelly scene to pick up the students. A local EMS came to check out the students but thankfully, no one was transported to the hospital from having too much Axe body spray.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“First, how naive we are about what constitutions are and what they mean around the world. And the second thing, the reason for the first, is how much reverence we have — in the United States and very few other countries — for this document.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) in a column from his posthumous book, “The Point of It All,” on Nov. 29, 2018.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article

Warren slips as Buttigieg, Biden, Sanders battle for lead in latest New Hampshire poll

closePundits say Warren slippingVideo

Pundits say Warren slipping

Medicare plan finally draws spotlight.

MANCHESTER, N.H. – A new poll in New Hampshire — the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House — indicates an airtight contest among South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden, and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

And the MassINC Polling Group survey for WBUR released Wednesday also points to a deterioration of support for another top-tier contender for the Democratic presidential nomination – Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

WARREN SHAKES UP CAMPAIGN ROUTINE AS POLL NUMBERS DECLINE

Buttigieg, a one-time longshot who’s soared in polls in Iowa and New Hampshire this autumn, stands at 18 percent among those likely to vote in the Granite State’s Feb. 11 Democratic presidential primary, with Biden at 17 percent and Sanders at 15 percent. Taking into account the survey’s margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 percentage points, the three candidates are basically all tied up for the top spot.

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg shakes hands with voters after filing to place his name on New Hampshire's primary ballot, in Concord, NH on Oct. 30, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg shakes hands with voters after filing to place his name on New Hampshire's primary ballot, in Concord, NH on Oct. 30, 2019

"What's remarkable about this is how close it remains," MassINC president Steve Koczela noted. “We've got three candidates, all within three points of each other — and Elizabeth Warren not that far behind, right there in that top tier.”

Koczela emphasized that the race for the New Hampshire primary “could go in any direction."

Warren – who like Sanders hails from a neighboring state to New Hampshire – stands at 12 percent in the poll. Since this is the first time the pollsters put out a survey this cycle in the New Hampshire presidential primary, no direct comparisons can be made. But her standing in the new poll is in line with her support in other surveys the past month in the New Hampshire primary. Warren registered from the upper teens to around 30 percent in most Granite State polling conducted from September through early November.

Warren has also seen her standing in the polls in Iowa and nationally deteriorate over the past month. The drop came after increased scrutiny of Warren's plans to pay for and implement a government-run, "Medicare-for-all." The populist senator continued to swear off raising middle-class taxes to pay for the high price tag attached to the single-payer health care system (roughly $20 trillion in new spending over a decade). And she broke with fellow progressive champion and 2020 rival Sanders — who wrote the "Medicare-for-all" bill in the Senate — over implementation. Warren's transition play would delay the immediate end of privately held insurance.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang – who’ve both spent a lot of time meeting voters in New Hampshire – each register at 5 percent in the poll.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and billionaire environmental and progressive activist Tom Steyer each stand at 3 percent, with former New York City mayor and multi-billionaire media mogul Mike Bloomberg at 2 percent. Bloomberg – who jumped into the race late last month – is skipping Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina, the first four states to hold contests in the presidential nominating calendar. Instead, he’s campaigning in the delegate-rich states that vote on Super Tuesday in early March, and beyond.

Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson are each at 1 percent in the survey, with everyone else in the still large field of Democratic White House hopefuls registering less than 1 percent. That includes former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, who last month declared his candidacy.

The poll also indicates that President Trump remains the overwhelming favorite to win New Hampshire’s Republican presidential primary. Trump grabs the backing of 74 percent of those saying they’re likely to vote in the state’s GOP primary. Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld – who’s been campaigning in New Hampshire nearly every week since launching his long-shot primary challenge to Trump in April, stands at 9 percent. Former Rep. Joe Walsh of Illinois – a very vocal Trump critic – registers at 4 percent.

The MassINC Polling Group survey for WBUR was conducted Dec. 3-8, with 442 likely Democratic presidential primary voters in New Hampshire questioned by live telephone operators.

Original Article

Pete Buttigieg can identify clients from 2007-10 consulting work, firm says

closeAfter the Buzz: Mayor Pete's McKinsey problemVideo

After the Buzz: Mayor Pete’s McKinsey problem

Buttigieg pressed to disclose clients.

A major consulting firm announced Monday it will allow presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, working to avoid losing momentum in his White House run, to identify the clients he served over a decade ago.

A spokesperson with McKinsey & Company told Fox News it recognized “the unique circumstances presented by a presidential campaign,” and, after getting permission from clients, “have informed Mayor Buttigieg that he may disclose the identity of the clients he served while at McKinsey from 2007 to 2010.”

McKinsey’s statement on Monday stated that the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, cannot “disclose confidential, proprietary or classified information obtained during the course of that work, or violate any security clearance.”

Buttigieg has been under growing pressure for transparency as his campaign gained traction in early voting states, particularly Iowa, less than two months before its caucuses.

BIDEN SAYS HE DOESN’T ‘NEED AN OBAMA ENDORSEMENT’ AMID REPORTED CRITICISM

The Democrat has yet to name specific companies he consulted during his tenure at the firm. But, he released a summary last Friday of the work he did at McKinsey that amounted to the most detailed look at his work to date.

Tracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contenderVideo

Buttigieg traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan for McKinsey so security issues could limit what he could reveal about that work. He has said his work for the firm largely involved working in small groups on monthslong assignments and completing studies for clients.

“The bulk of my work on these teams consisted of doing mathematical analysis, conducting research, and preparing presentations,” Buttigieg wrote. “I never worked on a project inconsistent with my values, and if asked to do so, I would have left the firm rather than participate.”

The 37-year-old mayor has been one of the party’s most prolific fundraisers this year — collecting more than $50 million so far in 2019 — in part by tapping the resources of big donors.

That’s set him apart from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who have appeased the party’s progressive base by relying largely on small-dollar donations from ordinary Americans.

Buttigieg has portrayed both progressive candidates as liberal contenders who might be too extreme to win against President Trump next year in a general election.

Pete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black votersVideo

Buttigieg has called on Warren to release additional years of tax returns to shed light on corporate clients she represented.

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Warren, in turn, called on him to release a full client list from McKinsey.

She also released new data late Sunday that said she was paid nearly $2 million for legal work stretching back three decades.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Elizabeth Warren reveals she made $1.9 million from private legal work over 3 decades

closeMarsh: Warren vs. Buttigieg is the fascinating Democrat matchup to watchVideo

Marsh: Warren vs. Buttigieg is the fascinating Democrat matchup to watch

Math and history favor the one who wins at least one of the first contests and Super Tuesday, Democratic political analyst Mary Anne Marsh says.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., received $1.9 million from private legal work during her time as a law professor stretching back three decades, according to a release by her campaign.

The work, since 1986, included fees from large corporate clients, her campaign said in the release.

Some of her clients included the attorneys for Rabobank, a Dutch financial institution that became a creditor in the Enron bankruptcy; former directors of Getty Oil, who were involved in Texaco’s bankruptcy; and women whose allegations of harm from silicone breast implants produced by Dow Corning were imperiled when the company filed for bankruptcy.

In May, Warren released a list of 56 cases on which she worked as an attorney going back to the 1980s, as The Associated Press reported; 15 pages of newly released data showed she was paid over $1.9 million on nearly 40 of those cases in total.

WARREN IN POLLING SLIDE AMID MEDICARE-FOR-ALL PLAN CRITICISM

The release Sunday came against the backdrop of an escalating feud between Warren and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana. The senator has condemned the closed-door fundraisers that the mayor has attended, suggesting Buttigieg could be making secret promises to top donors.

Buttigieg and his campaign responded that Warren should release past tax returns that detail her work for corporate clients. Warren previously had released 11 years of tax returns.

“We must nominate a candidate who can create the most robust possible contrast against Republicans on conflicts of interest and corruption issues. … Elizabeth does not sell access to her time — no closed door big dollar fundraisers, no bundling program, no perks or promises to any wealthy donor,” said Warren Communications Director Kristen Orthman.

She added: “Any candidate who refuses to provide basic details about his or her own record and refuses to allow voters or the press to understand who is buying access to their time and what they are getting in return will be seen by voters as part of the same business-as-usual politics that voters have consistently rejected.”

Tracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contenderVideo

Warren’s campaign said Sunday’s information provides more details on her business income that her returns did not provide because they didn’t fully itemize earnings.

Also Sunday, Warren said she believed Americans would be ready for a presidential ticket with two women at the top, rejecting concerns from some Democrats that a woman couldn’t beat Trump.

“Sure, why not?” she told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of a town hall campaign event in Charleston, South Carolina. “I think (voters) would support a lot of different combinations.”

Kamala Harris out of the 2020 presidential primary runningVideo

Warren has said she’d consider picking California Sen. Kamala Harris as a running mate. She also told the AP she would be “open” to asking former Vice President Joe Biden to reprise his old job.

“Look, it would be presumptuous of me to be talking about individuals, but I’m open to getting this right because that’s what we want to do,” Warren said. “We want to build a Democratic ticket and a stronger Democratic Party that’s ready to get out there and compete at the national level, at the state level, at the local level.”

Last week, Harris abruptly dropped out of the race for the presidential nomination, prompting a debate about whether a party claiming it valued diversity and inclusion was shortchanging candidates of color and women.

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Other than Warren, the top tier of Democrats has been made up entirely of white men.

Warren argued that voters were worried less about identity politics than the messages that candidates were offering.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article