Tom Cotton Grills ATF Nominee Over Hunter Biden’s Lying Firearm Background Check

Tom Cotton Grills ATF Nominee Over Hunter Biden's Lying Firearm Background Check Tom Cotton Grills ATF Nominee Over Hunter Biden's Lying Firearm Background Check Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) walks to a Senate meeting. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

By Jim Thomas | Wednesday, 26 May 2021 05:58 PM

Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton grilled President Joe Biden’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) nominee David Chipman about whether he would investigate Hunter Biden — if confirmed — for reportedly falsifying information during a background check to illegally obtain a gun, reported the Daily Caller.

“Should Hunter Biden be prosecuted for breaking this law?” Cotton asked Chipman.

Chipman responded by saying: “I will ensure that all violations of law are investigated and referred.”

During a Wednesday hearing, Cotton asked Chipman to publicly commit to investigating Hunter Biden, referencing a Politico report that said Biden answered “no” to the question about drug use on the Firearms Transaction Record for a gun in October of 2018.

Biden allegedly sent a text message on Jan. 29, 2019, saying his former sister-in-law turned girlfriend, Hallie Biden, stole a gun from the trunk of his car and told police and Secret Service that she threw it away due to concerns he might use it to hurt himself, the New York Post reported.

Just years prior, Biden had been discharged from the Navy Reserve after testing positive for cocaine.

Lying on a federal gun background check is a felony that carries up to a 10-year prison sentence as well as a $250,000 fine.

However, chances of being prosecuted by the Justice Department for falsifying information to illegally buy a gun are almost zero.

Reviews by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System in fiscal 2017 led to 112,000 gun-purchase denials because people were in forbidden categories, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). The Justice Department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) investigated 12,700 of those cases, reported the Washington Post.

How many of the investigated cases resulted in prosecutions?

Twelve.

That’s 0.09 percent of the cases ATF investigated.

Original Article