Trump Endorses Ex-Nevada GOP AG Adam Laxalt for Senate

Trump Endorses Ex-Nevada GOP AG Adam Laxalt for Senate adam laxalt points and speaks during a news conference Former Nevada GOP Attorney General Adam Laxalt (John Locher/AP)

By Eric Mack | Saturday, 21 August 2021 09:15 AM

A former Nevada attorney general and Iraq War veteran has received the coveted former President Donald Trump endorsement for Senate.

"Adam Laxalt is running for Senate in Nevada to defeat Harry Reid's, Chuck Schumer's, and Nancy Pelosi's handpicked successor, and win an America First majority in the U.S. Senate," Trump wrote Friday night in a statement from his Save America PAC.

"Adam is a Navy veteran who served our nation bravely in Iraq. As a former attorney general he has always supported our law enforcement and keeping our communities safe. He fought valiantly against the election fraud, which took place in Nevada. He is strong on secure borders and defending America against the radical left.

"Adam has my complete and total endorsement!"

Laxalt, 42, who served as the 33rd Nevada attorney general from 2015 to 2019, has the political bloodlines.

He is the son of former Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., and grandson of former Nevada governor and Sen. Paul Laxalt, R-Nev.

Laxalt has been vocal in calling out President Joe Biden's failures in the Afghanistan withdrawal.

"One of the toughest parts of a battlefield is capturing the bad guys, and especially when it comes to capturing the really bad guys, there's a lot that goes into it," Laxalt told Fox News on Friday night. "SEAL teams and the best of our best are sent on those missions at grave risk and those captures are – were incredibly important over the last few decades to get as many of the really hardened and terrible terrorists . . . off of the international terror battlefield for good."

"And to see that the Bagram prison was not properly secured and that we have thousands of those detainees that were released is absolutely unconscionable. I can't imagine that there weren't, you know, hundreds of hours devoted to figuring out what to do with these really bad folks," he added.

"And I won't take it as an excuse that somehow they didn't realize or didn't have enough chance to plan because the conversations were going as far back as 2006 about what the long-term plans were for the high-value terrorists."

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