Efforts to rebuild the Notre Dame cathedral resume

Carpenters put the skills of their Medieval colleagues on show on the plaza in front of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:15 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

As efforts to rebuild the Notre Dame resume, cathedral workers are turning to medieval methods in an effort to restore the building to what it once was. Carpenters and masons went back to work this week following months of little progress on the charred cathedral.

One issue that slowed the building process was a debate over the materials that were going to be used. Builders were divided on whether to use more fire safe materials or rebuild with the original supplies.

“I think this shows that it was the right thing to choose to reconstruct the framework of the cathedral identically in French oak,” stated restoration leader Jean-Louis Georgelin. “Secondly, it also shows us the method that we will use to rebuild the framework, truss after truss.”

Carpenters put the skills of their Medieval colleagues on show on the plaza in front of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

COVID-19 also slowed up the process, delaying repairs even later.

A fire broke out last year in the cathedral, creating damages worth an estimated $1 billion euros.

MORE NEWS: Police Clash With Yellow Vest Protesters In Paris

Original Article

Pence’s chief of staff says President Trump has narrowed Supreme Court nomination list

FILE – In this March 22, 2018, file photo, then-White House Director of Legislative Affairs and Assistant Marc Short speaks in the Brady press briefing room at the White House in Washington.(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:35 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff has said he expects a Supreme Court nomination will come very soon. On Sunday, Marc Short highlighted the history of Supreme Court nominations.

He believes the President will honor his obligation to the American people and nominate someone soon.

According to Short, President Trump has interviewed plenty of candidates for the position and recently narrowed his list for the position down to a handful of names.

“The President is going to stick with his obligation to do that,” stated Short. “He looks forward to making a nominee that, I think, the American people will be proud of.”

The chief of staff went on to say it is the obligation of the Senate to approve the nomination in whatever timeline they believe in.

Historically, he added the party in power has gone on to confirm the nominees and fulfill their obligation to the American people.

RELATED: Lawmakers Gear Up For Debate Over New Supreme Court Justice

Original Article

Biden accused of hypocrisy after 2016 comments in favor of Supreme Court confirmation during election year

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after he arrives at at New Castle Airport, in New Castle, Del., Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, as he returns from Duluth, Minn. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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UPDATED 10:15 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

Critics of Joe Biden have accused him of hypocrisy after he previously stated a Supreme Court justice could be replaced during an election year. Biden’s 2016 comments have garnered attention as Democrats push Republicans not to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat ahead of the election.

In a 2016 opinion piece for the New York Times, the former vice president blasted Republicans for holding up court nominees.

During an appearance the same year, he said if the President consults with the Senate, then a nominee would get his support even during an election year.

“I made it absolutely clear I would go forward with a confirmation process as chairman, even a few months before a presidential election, if the nominee were chosen with the advice and not merely the consent of the Senate, just as the Constitution requires,” stated Biden.

The President has called on Biden to release his own list of possible court nominees. He suggested the Democrat is afraid of alienating voters by naming nominees ahead of the election.

MORE NEWS: President Trump Pushes Back On Biden Criticism Of COVID-19 Response

Original Article

Bobcat Fire continues to spread in Calif., more than 90K acres burned

The wind whips embers from the Joshua trees burning in the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, Calif., Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:30 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

Several homes have been destroyed by the Bobcat Fire as it spreads in California.

According to authorities, the fire near Los Angeles County has burned over 90,000 acres of land and was 15% contained on Sunday.

Erratic winds pushed the flames into the Juniper Hills community, burning several semi-rural properties there. Evacuation orders were issued in the foothills north of the blaze on Saturday afternoon.

Alexis Miller of Los Angeles County Fire holds a water hose while protecting a home from the advancing Bobcat Fire along Cima Mesa Rd. Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Juniper Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

“It’s really, really sad out here, honestly,” said Littlerock resident Genovio Ascencio. “I feel sorry for all the people going through this right now.”

Officials have predicted the fire may not be fully contained until October 30th.

A home burns along Cima Mesa Rd. as the Bobcat Fire advances Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Juniper Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

RELATED: More Than 50K Acres Burned In Bobcat Fire, Officials Steer Flames Away From Historic Observatory

Original Article

Talks of new Supreme Court appointment prompt violent threats from left-wing activists

People gather at the Supreme Court in Washington, Saturday night, Sept. 19, 2020, to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the high court’s liberal justices, and a champion of gender equality. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:55 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

The possibility of President Trump potentially appointing another Supreme Court justice has prompted the left to make threats.

Democrat lawmakers, members of the media and Hollywood figures took to social media Saturday, where they appeared to urge citizens to commit violent crimes and riot to stop the administration from filling the seat of the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

One exchange included calls from a Canadian political science professor, Emmet Macfarlane, who encouraged people to “burn Congress down before letting Trump try to appoint anyone.”

A Canadian attorney later shared his concerns over the professor’s message. He asked, “If you were a Trump supporter in his class, would you risk being a target of his violent rage if he found out about you?”

American writer Beau Willimon suggested shutting the country down if President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell try to “ram through an appointment before the election.”

According to Washington Post writer Laura Bassett, riots will happen on a larger scale if the vote goes through.

Some far left members of Congress have also called for action, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. On social media, she called for all Americans to vote for Joe Biden, even if they don’t agree with him.

With the election less than two months away, Republicans and Democrats continue to debate whether or not the seat should be filled before the election.

Meanwhile, President Trump has reaffirmed Republicans have an obligation to fill the vacancy without delay.

RELATED: President Trump Hosts Rally In N.C., Pledges To Pick A Woman Supreme Court Nominee

Original Article

Murkowski ‘would not support’ Senate taking up potential Supreme Court nominee amid Ginsburg vacancy

close‘Extremely unlikely’ new SCOTUS justice could be confirmed before election: ExpertVideo

‘Extremely unlikely’ new SCOTUS justice could be confirmed before election: Expert

WSJ Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin on the possible election outcomes that could impact the future of the Supreme Court.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski on Sunday said her position “has not changed,” and that she “would not” support taking up a potential Supreme Court nominee ahead of the 2020 presidential election, despite Senate Republican leadership plans to forge ahead in filling the vacancy left bythe late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Murkowski, R-Alaska, in a statement Sunday, said that “for weeks,” she has said that she “would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election.”

MURKOWSKI, PRIOR TO GINSBURG PASSING, SAID SHE 'WOULD NOT VOTE' TO CONFIRM A NOMINEE TO SUPREME COURT BEFORE THE ELECTION

“Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed,” she said. “I did not support taking up a nomination eight months before the 2016 election to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Justice Scalia.”

She added: “We are now even closer to the 2020 election — less than two months out — and I believe the same standard must apply.”

Murkowski’s comments come after Ginsburg passed away on Friday at the age of 87 from complications surrounding metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Murkowski, prior to Ginsburg’s passing, did an interview with Alaska Public Media, where she said she “would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee.”

During the interview, Murkowski based her reasoning on precedent — noting the situation surrounding former President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee and D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Merrick Garland.

Obama nominated Garland to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who passed away in 2016, but Senate Majority Leader McConnell and Senate Republicans refused to hold a hearing or vote on his nomination, citing the imminent 2016 presidential election.

MCCONNELL: TRUMP'S SUPREME COURT NOMINEE 'WILL RECEIVE A VOTE ON THE FLOOR OF THE UNITED STATES SENATE'

“That was too close to an election, and that the people needed to decide,” Murkowski told Alaska Public Media, referencing McConnell’s argument at the time. “That the closer you get to an election, that argument becomes even more important.”

Just hours after learning of Ginsburg’s passing, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell vowed that a President Trump nominee to the high court to fill her vacancy “will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

Sen. Murkowski says she's 'disturbed' by McConnell's pledge to coordinate impeachment trial with White HouseVideo

“In the last midterm election before Justice Scalia’s death in 2016, Americans elected a Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of a lame-duck president’s second term. We kept our promise,” McConnell continued. “Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president’s Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year.”

SCHUMER: GINSBURG VACANCY SHOULD NOT BE FILLED UNTIL AFTER THE ELECTION

McConnell added that “by contrast, Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary.”

“Once again, we will keep our promise,” he said. “President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

But the nomination and confirmation process for the latest addition to the Supreme Court, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, took 89 days total for confirmation. It took 57 days from Kavanaugh's nomination to his confirmation hearing.

There are 44 days until Election Day.

Murkowski, during Kavanaugh’s confirmation process, was looked at as one of the final four swing senators who would determine whether the now-justice would be confirmed to the bench of the High Court. Murkowski remained undecided until the final hours prior to the confirmation vote.

Meanwhile, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine,said Saturday that whoever wins the presidency should nominate the next justice.

"In order for the American people to have faith in their elected officials, we must act fairly and consistently — no matter which political party is in power," Collins said in a tweeted statement. President Trump has the constitutional authority to make a nomination to fill the Supreme Court vacancy, and I would have no objection to the Senate Judiciary Committee's beginning the process of reviewing his nominee's credentials.”

"Given the proximity of the presidential election … I do not believe that the Senate should vote on the nominee prior to the election. In fairness to the American people, who will either be reelecting the president or selecting a new one, the decision on a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court should be made by the president who is elected in November 3.”

Meanwhile, President Trump urged Senate Republicans to confirm his eventual nominee.

“@GOP We were put in this position of power and importance to make decisions for the people who so proudly elected us, the most important of which has long been considered to be the selection of United States Supreme Court Justices,” Trump tweeted Saturday.

“We have this obligation, without delay!” He added.

Original Article

Cory Booker says GOP move to immediately confirm Ginsburg successor undermines legitimacy of Supreme Court

closeBret Baier on the death of Justice Ginsburg: 'She was quite a figure'Video

Bret Baier on the death of Justice Ginsburg: 'She was quite a figure'

Bret Baier shares his thoughts on the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her relationship with Antonin Scalia

Sen. Cory Booker said on Sunday that Republican plans to quickly move on confirming a successor to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was the face of the liberal bloc of the court and a trailblazer for women's rights, would undermine the legitimacy of the court, which serves as a check on the other two branches of government and relies on its implicit legitimacy because it doesn't have official means with which to enforce its rulings.

Booker, D-N.J., is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee that would play a key role in vetting and moving along any Trump nominee to fill Ginsburg's seat. He garnered headlines during the most recent Supreme Court confirmation for Justice Brett Kavanaugh after he declared an "I am Spartacus" moment after releasing an allegedly confidential email relating to Kavanaugh's confirmation although it had been cleared to be released at the time.

He is likely to again be at the forefront of Democrats' resistance to Trump's eventual Supreme Court nominee if Republicans move ahead with hearings.

Ex-Democratic presidential contender Cory Booker poses for photos after a black men's round table on Monday, Dec. 2, 2019, in Columbia, S.C. Booker is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee which will play a key role in vetting any Supreme Court nominee from President Trump. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

Ex-Democratic presidential contender Cory Booker poses for photos after a black men's round table on Monday, Dec. 2, 2019, in Columbia, S.C. Booker is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee which will play a key role in vetting any Supreme Court nominee from President Trump. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG DEAD AT 87

"I can only imagine that Justice Ginsburg… understood that the legitimacy of the Supreme Court at a time that other institutions in our democracy have been losing legitimacy, have been under attack," Booker said on CBS' "Face the Nation."

"I think she believed that the legitimacy of the court was so profoundly important. And this is one of those moments with so much at stake, from civil rights to voting rights to health care in and of itself, these decisions that the Supreme Court makes, it's important that they not only have the force of law but the force of the legitimacy of everyone. So, for Republicans to move forward like this, it really undermines that," he continued.

Booker emphasized that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has "a tremendous amount of control" over the Senate's agenda, but said he hoped some Republicans would be receptive to "a moral appeal" to wait until after the presidential election to move on a Supreme Court appointment.

CBS News' Margaret Brennan pushed back against Booker, noting that he had said in 2016 it was wrong for the Senate to delay action on then-President Barack Obama's nominee for late Justice Antonin Scalia's seat. Booker noted that the 2020 presidential election is much closer now than it was in 2016 when Scalia died and that in some states voting for the presidential election has already started.

He added that Republicans are reversing their 2016 position when they said voters should have a say in who gets to nominate the next Supreme Court justice.

TOM COTTON SAYS SENATE WILL MOVE FORWARD ON CONFIRMING GINSBURG SUCCESSOR 'WITHOUT DELAY' WHILE TOP SENATE DEM ALLEGES HYPOCRISY

"We had literally my colleagues speaking to what the rules should be, what the guiding principles they we're operating on," he said. "And for now for them to so severely violate their own words I think does a tremendous amount of damage to the institution of the Senate as well as to the legitimacy of the court."

Republicans argue that things are different now compared to how they were in 2016 — the Senate in 2014 was elected to serve as a bulwark against then-President Barack Obama, they say, and was elected in 2018 to support Trump.

"In the last midterm before Justice Scalia's death in 2016, Americans elected a Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of a lame-duck president's second term. Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president's Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year," McConnell said in a statement Friday.

"By contrast, Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary," he added.

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Brennan also asked Booker to weigh in on allusions some Democrats have made to packing the Supreme Court and getting rid of the legislative filibuster in the case that Republicans fill Ginsburg's seat but Democrats take the Senate and White House. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has said that "nothing is off the table" if that happens.

Booker did not directly address the question from Brennan, and instead implored Democrats to focus on winning the upcoming elections and convincing some moderate Republicans to buck their party on the Supreme Court nomination.

"There's a double presumption in there that I just do not want people to lose focus on," he said. Booker instead said people should let "their voices be heard now to appeal to the decency and honor of people who spoke what this process should be. And number two, is this election. Unless we win the Senate back, unless we win the White House, all these questions are just hypothetical and moot. We need to focus on what is at hand… We need to win this election. Everything is on the line."

Fox News' Brian Flood contributed to this report.

Original Article

When Iran regime changes its behavior, there’ll be chance for true global stability in region: Pompeo

closePompeo: President Trump realized the 'real threat' to Middle East peace was IranVideo

Pompeo: President Trump realized the 'real threat' to Middle East peace was Iran

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo provides insight into the historic Middle East peace plan.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday there is a chance for global stability in the Middle East only if the Iranian regime changes its behavior.

The world needs to unite around the central idea that the Islamic Republic of Iran is the greatest threat,” Pompeo told “Sunday Morning Futures.” “And when that regime changes its behavior, we have the chance to create true global stability in the region.”

“That's what we've been working on. That's what President Trump asked us to do. And now, three years in, we can show the fruits of that effort,” he added.

US OFFICIALS TO MOVE FORWARD WITH ENFORCING UN SANCTIONS ON IRAN

The Trump administration took action against Iran this week, declaring that there will be "consequences" for United Nations member countries that violate the arms embargo that was set to expire on Oct. 18.

"The U.N. sanctions snapped back, putting another increasing restraint on the capacity for the Islamic Republic of Iran to create harm in the Middle East," Pompeo said. "The previous deal which Secretary [of State John] Kerry and Vice President [Joe] Biden signed off on was to allow the Iranians on Oct. 18, just a couple of weeks from now, to traffic in weapons again. It's nuts, absolutely nuts, and we stopped that. We stopped it last night with action at the United Nations."

Pompeo also said Sunday that more countries in the Middle East will follow the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain in normalizing relationships with Israel.

"There will be other countries that will make the right decision to recognize that Israel has its right to exist, and they’ll want to do business with them and want to connect with them and want their people to have exchanges," Pompeo said. "I saw the number of LinkedIn exchanges between the United Arab Emirates and Israel — off the charts the day after this announcement. The people of those countries understand that this historic rejection of Israel and its right to exist was the wrong thing to do."

President Donald Trump walks to the Abraham Accords signing ceremony at the White House, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, in Washington with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Bahrain Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa and United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Donald Trump walks to the Abraham Accords signing ceremony at the White House, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, in Washington with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Bahrain Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa and United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Trump on Tuesday declared the "dawn of a new Middle East” as he presided over the signing of two historic Middle East diplomatic deals between Israel and the two Gulf nations.

Pompeo described the Trump administration as taking a "fundamentally different approach" to foreign policy in the Middle East.

"The establishment Middle East policy was that you had to resolve the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians first," Pompeo said. "The president came to understand quickly that the real threat to these countries was the Islamic Republic of Iran so we flipped the narrative. We worked to deliver a coalition to get the Gulf states to work together, to convince them that they could in fact work alongside and partner with and do commerce with the state of Israel."

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Fox News' Caitlin McFall and Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Original Article

Rochester, N.Y. provides counseling services after shooting

Screengrab via AFP News Agency.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:05 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

The city of Rochester, New York will be providing counseling services following a tragic mass shooting this weekend. The services will be held at church and school campuses on Sunday to provide support to the community.

Two people were killed and 14 injured in the shooting, which occurred early Saturday morning during a party.

The city held counseling services Saturday afternoon as well after the tragedy shook the community.

Mayor Lovely Warren has urged residents to take advantage of the counseling services and adhere to safety restrictions.

“I’m asking everyone to allow the police department to do what they need to do to make sure justice is served here,” she said. “We’re all in this together and we need your help.”

Police continue to investigate the shooting and have not yet taken a suspect into custody.

READ MORE: 2 Dead, 14 Injured Following Backyard Party Shooting In N.Y.

Original Article

Biden accused of hypocrisy after 2016 comments in favor of Supreme Court confirmation during election year

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after he arrives at at New Castle Airport, in New Castle, Del., Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, as he returns from Duluth, Minn. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:15 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

Critics of Joe Biden have accused him of hypocrisy after he previously stated a Supreme Court justice could be replaced during an election year. Biden’s 2016 comments have garnered attention as Democrats push Republicans not to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat ahead of the election.

In a 2016 opinion piece for the New York Times, the former vice president blasted Republicans for holding up court nominees.

During an appearance the same year, he said if the President consults with the Senate, then a nominee would get his support even during an election year.

“I made it absolutely clear I would go forward with a confirmation process as chairman, even a few months before a presidential election, if the nominee were chosen with the advice and not merely the consent of the Senate, just as the Constitution requires,” stated Biden.

The President has called on Biden to release his own list of possible court nominees. He suggested the Democrat is afraid of alienating voters by naming nominees ahead of the election.

MORE NEWS: President Trump Pushes Back On Biden Criticism Of COVID-19 Response

Original Article

Bobcat Fire continues to spread in Calif., more than 90K acres burned

The wind whips embers from the Joshua trees burning in the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, Calif., Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:30 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

Several homes have been destroyed by the Bobcat Fire as it spreads in California.

According to authorities, the fire near Los Angeles County has burned over 90,000 acres of land and was 15% contained on Sunday.

Erratic winds pushed the flames into the Juniper Hills community, burning several semi-rural properties there. Evacuation orders were issued in the foothills north of the blaze on Saturday afternoon.

Alexis Miller of Los Angeles County Fire holds a water hose while protecting a home from the advancing Bobcat Fire along Cima Mesa Rd. Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Juniper Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

“It’s really, really sad out here, honestly,” said Littlerock resident Genovio Ascencio. “I feel sorry for all the people going through this right now.”

Officials have predicted the fire may not be fully contained until October 30th.

A home burns along Cima Mesa Rd. as the Bobcat Fire advances Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Juniper Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

RELATED: More Than 50K Acres Burned In Bobcat Fire, Officials Steer Flames Away From Historic Observatory

Original Article

GOP’s Scott, Baker don’t want Trump to fill Supreme Court vacancy before election

closeSen. Tom Cotton: Senate will move forward 'without delay' on Ginsburg successorVideo

Sen. Tom Cotton: Senate will move forward 'without delay' on Ginsburg successor

Sen. Tom Cotton on Republicans having enough votes to confirm a nominee to the Supreme Court.

Moderate Republican Govs. Phil Scott of Vermont and Charlie Baker of Massachusetts separately pushed for the Trump administration to hold off on filling Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat until after Election Day.

GINSBURG VACANCY PUTS PRESSURE ON TRUMP-CRITIC REPUBLICANS IN SENATE

"The passing of Justice Ginsburg is not only a loss for the court but for the entire nation, and I urge President Trump and the U.S. Senate to allow the American people to cast their ballots for president before a new justice is nominated or confirmed," Baker wrote on Twitter.

"The Supreme Court is too important to rush and must be removed from partisan political infighting," he continued.

Scott expressed a similar sentiment following news of Ginsburg's death Friday at the age of 87.

"I am saddened to learn of the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg," Scott wrote on Twitter. "I send my heartfelt condolences to her family, friends, and colleagues. … While it is important to take the time to mourn her passing, we must also follow precedent, as well as her dying wishes, and delay the appointment process until after Inauguration Day."

Moderates including Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, oppose President Trump's intention to nominate a new Supreme Court justice before Americans vote in November. Collins, who is in a reelection fight, said on Saturday she wants whoever wins in November to nominate the next justice. She faced backlash in 2018 for supporting Trump nominee Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

In this April 6, 2018, file photo, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg applauds after a performance in her honor after she spoke about her life and work during a discussion at Georgetown Law School in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

In this April 6, 2018, file photo, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg applauds after a performance in her honor after she spoke about her life and work during a discussion at Georgetown Law School in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

"In fairness to the American people, who will either be reelecting the president or selecting a new one, the decision on a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court should be made by the president who is elected on November 3," she said in a statement.

MURKOWSKI, PRIOR TO GINSBURG PASSING, SAID SHE 'WOULD NOT VOTE' TO CONFIRM A NOMINEE TO SUPREME COURT BEFORE ELECTION

And former Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., a noted Trump critic, also opposes nominating a justice before the election in November. He compared the situation at hand to that of former President Barack Obama nominating Merrick Garland to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia in 2016.

"In 2016, nine months before an election, we Republicans said that the next president should fill a Supreme Court vacancy," Flake wrote on Twitter on Saturday. "Today, six weeks before an election, we should hold the same position. Preserving the institution of the Senate should be paramount to any political gain."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced, soon after Ginsburg's death, that the Senate would vote on a nominee put forward by Trump to replace her.

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McConnell hopes to avoid any Republican defections as Democrats plan to try to peel off enough GOP senators to defeat a vote before Inauguration Day. (A tie would place the fate of a nominee in the hands of Vice President Pence, in his role as Senate president.)

Fox News' Sam Dorman and Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Original Article

President Trump gives TikTok deal his blessing

FILE – A federal judge has approved a request from a group of WeChat users to delay looming U.S. government restrictions that could effectively make the popular app nearly impossible to use. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:40 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

President Trump has given the deal between TikTok, Oracle and Walmart his blessing. His administration confirmed the deal this weekend, which will keep the video sharing service from shutting down.

Oracle will now host all data affiliated with American users.

The company will also get at least a 12% stake in TikTok, while Walmart will be able to claim up to a 20% stake.

“They’ll be hiring at least 25,000 people, and it will most likely be incorporated in Texas,” stated President Trump. “It’ll be a brand new company, …it will have nothing to do with China.”

The deal will also provide $5 billion to the U.S. to use for educational purposes. It is expected to take effect on Sunday.

“It’s a great deal for America,” added the President.

MORE NEWS: President Trump Slams Mail-In Voting As A ‘Scam,’ Says It Will Be ‘A Disaster’

Original Article

President Trump hosts rally in N.C., pledges to pick a woman Supreme Court nominee

President Donald Trump wraps up his speech at a campaign rally at Fayetteville Regional Airport, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Fayetteville, N.C. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:30 AM PT – Sunday, September 20, 2020

President Trump hosted a “Great American Comeback” event in North Carolina on Saturday night as part of his presidential campaign for a second term. He shared his condolences for the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whom he called a tremendous inspiration to all Americans, regardless of their political views.

“Her landmark rulings, fierce devotion to justice and her courageous battle against cancer should inspire all Americans,” he stated. “You may disagree with her, but she was an inspiration to a tremendous number of people, I say all Americans.”

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020 at the Fayetteville Regional Airport in Fayetteville, N.C. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

He then confirmed he will pick a replacement for Ginsburg’s seat before the election and pledged to select a woman for the job.

“I will be putting forth a nominee next week,” he said. “It will be a woman.”

The President went on to highlight how he has fulfilled his promises to the American people over the last three years. He touted raising the real median household income by nearly $70,000 and getting more than 16 million people out of poverty.

He also referred to Democrat nominee Joe Biden as “the worse candidate in history” and slammed the media as an “enemy of the people.” This comment was in reference to a CNN hosted town hall, where President Trump said Biden was given easy questions to answer.

President Donald Trump wraps up his speech at a campaign rally at Fayetteville Regional Airport, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Fayetteville, N.C. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The President praised the recent efforts of his administration and concluded the event by saying he is confident in his ability to win the battleground state.

RELATED: Lawmakers Gear Up For Debate Over New Supreme Court Justice

Original Article

Hillary Clinton says McConnell, Trump move to confirm Ginsburg successor shows ‘lust for power’

closeBret Baier on the death of Justice Ginsburg: 'She was quite a figure'Video

Bret Baier on the death of Justice Ginsburg: 'She was quite a figure'

Bret Baier shares his thoughts on the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her relationship with Antonin Scalia

Former Democratic president Bill Clinton and former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on Sunday both weighed in on the fight over the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was a trailblazer for women's rights and the face of the liberal bloc on the Supreme Court — and Hillary Clinton accused Republicans of a "lust for power" in moving to quickly confirm Ginsburg's successor.

Hillary Clinton was part of a major Supreme Court battle after the death of late Justice Antonin Scalia in 2016 as she ran for president. Senate Republicans chose to hold Scalia's seat open until after the presidential election that year, meaning that Clinton was running with a Supreme Court seat on the line. Now President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden should be doing the same, she said, and Republicans are in the wrong for trying to push through a nomination before Inauguration Day in January.

"The decision that Senator McConnell made back in 2016 in the midst of that presidential election, but at a much earlier time when Justice Scalia unexpectedly passed away, is what should be the standard now," Hillary Clinton said on NBC's "Meet The Press" Sunday. She added Republicans should be "held to account" for their previous actions.

Former U.S. Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at the Woman's National Democratic Club in Washington, U.S., November 2, 2017. Clinton Sunday accused President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of "lust for power." REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RC113EB26F20

Former U.S. Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at the Woman's National Democratic Club in Washington, U.S., November 2, 2017. Clinton Sunday accused President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of "lust for power." REUTERS/Joshua Roberts – RC113EB26F20

TOM COTTON SAYS SENATE WILL MOVE FORWARD ON CONFIRMING GINSBIRG SUCCESSOR 'WITHOUT DELAY' WHILE TOP SENATE DEM ALLEGES HYPOCRISY

She added: "But as you clearly heard, that is not what they are intending and it's another blow to our institutions. Our institutions are being basically undermined by the lust for power, power for personal gain in the case of the president or power for institutional gain in the case of Mitch McConnell."

Republicans argue that 2020 is different than 2016 — the Senate in 2014 was elected to serve as a bulwark against then-President Barack Obama and was elected in 2018 to support Trump. Democrats say that argument is dishonest.

"In the last midterm before Justice Scalia's death in 2016, Americans elected a Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of a lame-duck president's second term. Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president's Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year," McConnell said in a statement Friday.

"By contrast, Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary," he added.

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG DEAD AT 87

Bill Clinton, as the president who nominated Ginsburg to the Supreme Court, also opined on Republicans' plans, but first reflected on his relationship with the late justice who has been praised by those on both sides of the aisle since her death Friday.

"She was a force for equality for men as well as women," Bill Clinton said on CNN's State of the Union. "She was consistent and she did it in a way that was level headed and on the level and respectful of different opinions and other judges on the court."

Clinton added, regarding when he nominated Ginsburg to the court: "She was disarmingly straightforward. We hadn't been talking but a couple of minutes before I felt like we were just two friends having an honest conversation about American history, the Constitution, and the law and how it affected real people."

Bill Clinton also slammed Republicans for aiming to immediately confirm a successor to Ginsburg without waiting for the results of the presidential election.

"Well it's superficially hypocritical, isn't it," he said. "Mitch McConnell wouldn't give President Obama's nominee, Merrick Garland, a hearing 10 months before the presidential election. And now that meant that we went a long time with eight judges on the court… Both for Senator McConnell and President Trump their first value is power and they're trying to jam the court with as many ideological judges as they can."

Bill Clinton also tongue-in-cheek gave McConnell credit, saying, "there's a case to be made for the argument" McConnell made in 2016 for letting the voters decide who they wanted nominating the next Supreme Court justice. He said what McConnell is arguing now "doesn't cut any mustard."

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While then-President Bill Clinton may have been the one to nominate Ginsburg, Hillary Clinton was the one who recommended that he consider Ginsburg for the seat. On Sundya, she reflected on her thoughts on the late justice, as well.

"I had known Ruth Bader Ginsburg for a number of years and I had followed her work, I was a great admirer of her groundbreaking litigation," she said, while praising Ginsburg's time as a law professor and as an appellate judge. Clinton also praised "how well she got along with her colleagues including at that time Judge Scalia before he was elevated to the Supreme Court."

She added that she asked her husband to "take a very hard look at Judge Ginsburg" but that "probably her most effective advocate was her husband Marty … Her love affair, her long marriage with her partner Marty was really a sight to behold… He was in her corner from the very moment he met her at Cornell right until the very end."

Original Article

Klobuchar urges Senate Republicans to use their ‘moral compasses’ in considering Supreme Court vacancy

closeSupreme Court vacancy takes focus in 2020 raceVideo

Supreme Court vacancy takes focus in 2020 race

Lt. Col. Allen West, Republican Party of Texas chairman on the political impact of Trump nominating a Supreme Court justice ahead of the election.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar on Sunday called on Senate Republicans to use their "moral compasses" and resist replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg until after the next president is inaugurated..

During an appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Klobuchar, D-Minn., hailed Ginsburg, who died Friday, as an “icon” and “hero.” Saying "our democracy is at stake," she urged her Senate colleagues to vote against considering President Trump’s nominee, expected to be announced as soon as next week.

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG DEAD AT 87

“I put it on my Republican colleagues because they know what is at stake. People are literally voting in my state right now,” she said, noting that “health care is on the line” and that oral arguments before the high court over the Affordable Care Act are slated for Nov. 10. “This is coinciding with an election.”

“Whatever [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell does right now, my Republican colleagues understand that the voters are voting,” she continued. “And a number of them have already said that the next president, whoever wins, should be able to pick the justice.”

Klobuchar was seemingly referring to Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who said before Ginsburg’s death that she would not vote to confirm a high court nominee ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election; and Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, who said Saturday that whoever wins the presidency should nominate the next justice.

“The people pick the president; the president picks the justice,” Klobuchar said. “That was the McConnell rule, and that is the precedent they set.”

McConnell, R-Ky., hours after learning of Ginsburg’s passing, vowed Friday that a Trump nominee “will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

Democrats quickly accused McConnell and Republican leaders of hypocrisy, citing President Obama’s 2016 Supreme Court nominee, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Merrick Garland.

Obama nominated Garland to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia, but McConnell refused to hold a hearing or vote on his nomination, citing the imminent presidential election.

TRUMP URGES REPUBLICANS TO FILL GINSBURG VACANCY 'WITHOUT DELAY'

“While Mitch McConnell has said what he has said, these people are not beholden to him,” Klobuchar said of Senate Republicans. “They are beholden to their own integrity, own moral compasses, and are going to have to make their own decisions.”

But CNN’s Jake Tapper pressed Klobuchar, citing her comments in 2016 about the Garland nomination, when she said: “The Constitution is clear. The Senate must consider the president’s nominee and then choose whether to vote yes or no. We must do our job, hold hearings and vote.”

Klobuchar pushed back, saying Republicans effectively changed the rules with Garland.

“They sen,t this precedent, and [now] they can’t mess around and use raw political power right in the middle of an election," she said.

Original Article

Pelosi doesn’t rule out using impeachment as option to stop Trump Supreme Court pick

closeWhat is the legal legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg?Video

What is the legal legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

King's College senior fellow scholar Mark Smith and University of Memphis law professor Steve Mulroy discuss Ginsburg's career.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday would not rule out impeachment as an option to stop President Trump’s U.S. Supreme Court pick from being confirmed to the bench, saying Democrats will “use every arrow in our quiver” to block the eventual nominee.

Just hours after it was announced that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had passed away on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., vowed that a Trump nominee to the Supreme Court to fill her vacancy “will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

During an interview on ABC News’ “This Week,” Pelosi, D-Calif., was asked whether she and House Democrats would move to impeach the president, or Attorney General Bill Barr in an effort to prevent the Senate from acting.

“We have our options. We have arrows in our quiver that I’m not about to discuss right now but the fact is we have a big challenge in our country,” Pelosi said. “This president has threatened to not even accept the results of the election.”

She added: “Our main goal would be to protect the integrity of the election as we protect the people from the coronavirus.”

Pelosi was pressed again on whether she would employ impeachment tactics, to which she said the Constitution requires that Congress “use every arrow in our quiver.”

“We have a responsibility,” Pelosi said. “We take an oath to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. We have a responsibility to meet the needs of the American people.”

She added: “When we weigh the equities of protecting our democracy, it requires us to use every arrow in our quiver.”

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.

Original Article

Tom Cotton says Senate will move forward on confirming Ginsburg successor ‘without delay’ while top Senate Dem alleges hypocrisy

closeSen. Tom Cotton: Senate will move forward 'without delay' on Ginsburg successorVideo

Sen. Tom Cotton: Senate will move forward 'without delay' on Ginsburg successor

Sen. Tom Cotton on Republicans having enough votes to confirm a nominee to the Supreme Court.

Sen. Tom Cotton said on "Fox News Sunday" that the Senate "will move forward without delay" in confirming a new Supreme Court justice to the seat of late justice and women's rights pioneer Ruth Bader Ginsburg — as Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Chris Coons said Republicans are being hypocritical by moving to advance a nominee.

"My condolences to Justice Ginsburg's family and my regard for her lifelong dedication to public service," Cotton, R-Ark., said of the justice, who is regarded as one of the lions of the legal profession and was the face of the liberal bloc of the Supreme Court.

"The Senate will exercise our constitutional duty," Cotton said, saying the Senate would process the nomination and hold hearings. "We will move forward without delay."

FILE - In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton is on President Trump's Supreme Court list. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)

FILE – In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton is on President Trump's Supreme Court list. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG DEAD AT 87

Asked whether a vote would happen before the presidential election, Cotton noted that it was possible, but not guaranteed.

"There will be a vote, there have been some cases like Justice Ginsburg herself" when the confirmation process "took less than 44 days," Cotton said. "There have been other cases which it took longer, so it's too soon to say right now."

Meanwhile, Coons, D-Del., implored Republicans to honor a precedent he says they set in 2016 by blocking then-President Barack Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland, a judge on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, as well as the reported dying wishes of Ginsburg that whoever is elected on Nov. 3 choose her successor.

"My condolences to the family, the loved ones, of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg," Coons said. "She spent 27 years on our country's highest court as a towering figure, a trailblazer, someone who fought for gender equity."

Coons added: "Her dying wish, dictated to her granddaughter, as she passed on Rosh Hashana, was that the voters should choose the next president. The next president should choose her successor. That's because she understood deeply our Constitution and the significance of the Supreme Court and its legitimacy. For the Republican majority to push through a new justice in a partisan confirmation process will further divide our country, will further challenge the legitimacy of the court, and I think would dishonor Justice Ginsburg's legacy."

In this image from video, Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., delivers a nominating speech during the second night of the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. (Democratic National Convention via AP)

In this image from video, Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., delivers a nominating speech during the second night of the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. (Democratic National Convention via AP)

LIVE UPDATES: AFTER RUTH BADER GINSBURG'S DEATH, THE LATEST ON THE SUPREME COURT NOMINATION FIGHT

"Fox News Sunday" host Chris Wallace pushed back on Coons, showing him comments he made in 2016 telling senators to "do our jobs" and process the Garland nomination.

Coons said that among key differences between now and then are the fact that early voting for president has already started — the 2016 vacancy fight started much earlier in the year as presidential primaries were still raging. Further, Coons said, there was not as significant a precedent in 2016 but now Republicans have entrenched one.

"The Republican majority set this new precedent," Coons said. "They set it in 2016, they fought hard for it. In fact, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee Lindsey Graham restated it in 2018. So if they were going to set a new precedent that in an election year there shouldn't be a hearing, meetings, votes, they should live by it."

Wallace also pushed back on Cotton, playing his own words from 2016 when he told the Senate that they should hold off on processing the Garland nomination and give American voters a say in who nominated the next Supreme Court justice. Cotton said that 2016 is different too, but in the mandate voters gave the Republican Senate majority in the most recent midterms

"In 2014 the American people elected a Republican majority to the Senate to put the brakes on President Obama's judicial nominations. In 2018 we had a referendum on this question. Just a month before the 2018 midterms we had the vote on Justice Kavanaugh. There could not have been a clearer mandate," Cotton said, referencing that Republicans managed to actually expand their Senate majority in 2018 despite losing the House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has made a similar argument since 2016, saying it would be consistent for Republicans to confirm a justice nominated by President Trump.

"In the last midterm before Justice Scalia's death in 2016, Americans elected a Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of a lame-duck president's second term. Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president's Supreme Court nominee ina presidential election year," McConnell said in a statement Friday.

"By contrast, Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary," he added.

Cotton was recently added to Trump's list of potential Supreme Court nominees, but is unlikely to be picked, as Trump has said he will choose a woman to replace Ginsburg. Two of the women currently perceived to be frontrunners are Amy Coney Barrett, a judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, and Barbara Lagoa, who sits on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Barrett, a former Notre Dame law professor and devout Catholic, gained cult-like popularity among religious leaning court-watchers after her contentious 2017 confirmation hearing for the 7th Circuit.

"The dogma lives loudly within you, and that's a concern," Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said at the time, outraging conservatives.

Trump has said that he will nominate a person to fill Ginsburg's seat and McConnell has sworn that nominee will get a Senate vote. Democrats, however, have said that the person elected president on Nov. 3 should make the selection. They've alluded that if they take the Senate and presidency they could bust the Senate legislative filibuster next year and pack the Supreme Court in retaliation if Republicans move ahead. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has said "nothing is off the table" in that case.

Wallace asked Coons whether or not Democrats would take those actions if a Trump nominee is confirmed and Democrats manage to take the Senate and presidency as Republicans replace Ginsburg. He did not directly answer the question but said the Senate "shouldn't be racing through this partisan process" and that he would "see if I can't pursuade some friends" to "respect" tradition and precedent by putting off a confirmation vote on a Trump nominee.

Original Article

Bill Gates says he’s ‘optimistic’ pandemic ‘won’t last indefinitely’ in ‘Fox News Sunday’ interview, lauds vaccine progress

closeBill Gates: The way travel ban was executed may have actually made things worse, not betterVideo

Bill Gates: The way travel ban was executed may have actually made things worse, not better

‘Fox News Sunday’ anchor Chris Wallace previews his exclusive interview with Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

EXCLUSIVE: Microsoft founder Bill Gates said in an exclusive "Fox News Sunday" interview that he believes the United States will be able to get back to normal life around summer 2021 due to progress made on vaccines and he's "optimistic" the coronavirus pandemic "won't last indefinitely" — although he also panned President Trump's handling of the health crisis and said the coronavirus caused "huge setbacks" in human progress in poorer countries.

Gates' interview with host Chris Wallace came as the tech titan's charitable foundation is giving $650 million to fight the disease, which is the largest commitment by any independent foundation. Gates told Wallace that much of that money is going toward ensuring that once vaccines are approved, they are able to be manufactured for poor countries as well as more developed countries like the United States.

Gates said that during the coronavirus pandemic, vaccination rates have dropped by 14% in developing countries, erasing 20 years of progress, and that for the first time in years "extreme poverty" is increasing, causing ill-effects on education, mental health, and other indicators that he said is "much greater than I expected."

"We’re helping seed some R&D money very quickly for the best vaccine approaches, and then making sure that, when we get a vaccine, it’s not just for the rich countries," Gates said of his foundation's efforts.

Co-Founder of Microsoft Bill Gates answered questions during an interview on at the EU Commission Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium in 2018. Gates said on "Fox News Sunday" that (Photo by Thierry Monasse/Getty Images)

Co-Founder of Microsoft Bill Gates answered questions during an interview on at the EU Commission Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium in 2018. Gates said on "Fox News Sunday" that (Photo by Thierry Monasse/Getty Images)

BILL GATES TELLS CHRIS WALLACE TRUMP'S TRAVEL BAN MAY HAVE WORSENED CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

He added that stomping out the pandemic worldwide will help ensure "that the pandemic isn't just constantly coming back to the United States."

Gates said he expects vaccine approvals to come by early 2021, as White House Coronavirus Task Force member Dr. Anthony Fauci and many others in the government said is a realistic timeline at the rate trials are currently moving. If that is the case, Gates said, "then by next summer the U.S. will be starting to go back to normal. And by the end of the year, our activities can be fairly normal, if we’re also helping these other countries."

He added: "The end of the epidemic, best case is probably 2022. But during 2021, the numbers, we should be able to drive them down, if we take the global approach. So, you know, thank goodness vaccine technology was there, that the funding came up, that the companies put their best people on it. That’s why I’m optimistic this won’t last indefinitely."

Fauci and others have said the major challenge on vaccines goes beyond just having a safe and effective vaccine, and Gates said there could be "three or four" safe and effective formulas that get Food and Drug Administration approval. The government and vaccine-makers will have to mass-manufacture vaccine doses and distribute them widely, making decisions along the way about who gets doses first. Gates said he is disappointed in the United States for not putting in efforts to make and distribute vaccines in poorer countries.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a House Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing on July 31, 2020 in Washington, DC. Fauci has repeatedly said one or more coronavirus vaccines are likely to be approved by late 2020 or early 2021. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a House Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing on July 31, 2020 in Washington, DC. Fauci has repeatedly said one or more coronavirus vaccines are likely to be approved by late 2020 or early 2021. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

BIDEN, HARRIS CONCERNS ABOUT TRUMP INTERFERENCE IN CORONAVIRUS VACCINE NOT SHARED BY TOP HEALTH EXPERTS

"The place the U.S. has not shown up is in this issue of helping to buy the vaccine for these developing countries," he said. "Now, that vehicle doesn’t look like it’ll come to fruition. You know, so maybe the continuing resolution — you know, we’re hoping to get that organized."

Gates added, once vaccines are proven: "[T]he challenge will be, OK, how do you allocate it? The way to answer that challenge is just to get so much volume that you’re not having to make really terrible tradeoffs. You know… if you distribute equitably, you have half as many deaths than if you just give to — only to the rich."

Gates during the interview also criticized the Trump administration's coronavirus response in more general terms, and specifically said that the early travel bans issued on China in January and Europe in March may have actually exacerbated coronavirus spread.

The U.S. government's effort to quickly test and manufacture vaccines is called "Operation Warp Speed." Officials have said that as several potential vaccines are currently going through testing to ensure their safety and efficacy, there are already doses being manufactured so that once they are approved they can immediately be widely distributed.

A political fight has broken out over the efforts to speed along vaccines, with Democrats casting doubt over whether President Trump might push an unsafe vaccine on the American people for political reasons. Republicans have accused Democrats of irresponsible rhetoric that may drive down the number of Americans willing to take a vaccine once one or more formulas are approved.

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams speaks during a briefing on coronavirus in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, Saturday, March 14, 2020, in Washington, as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin listens. Adams has said in no uncertain terms that any coronavirus vaccine distributed to Americans will be safe and effective. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams speaks during a briefing on coronavirus in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, Saturday, March 14, 2020, in Washington, as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin listens. Adams has said in no uncertain terms that any coronavirus vaccine distributed to Americans will be safe and effective. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

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But Surgeon General Jerome Adams has sworn that any vaccines given to the American people will be safe. He made especially frank comments under questioning from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing this month. Sanders said he was satisfied with the surgeon general's answer.

"There will be no shortcuts. This vaccine will be safe. It will be effective. Or it won't get moved along. And when a vaccine is either approved or authorized by the FDA, I and my family will be in line to get it," Adams said.

Thank you," Sanders replied. "I think that's the kind of answer that the American people are looking toward hearing."

Original Article

Tom Cotton says Senate will move forward on confirming Ginsburg successor ‘without delay’

closeSupreme Court vacancy takes focus in 2020 raceVideo

Supreme Court vacancy takes focus in 2020 race

Lt. Col. Allen West, Republican Party of Texas chairman on the political impact of Trump nominating a Supreme Court justice ahead of the election.

Sen. Tom Cotton said on "Fox News Sunday" that the Senate "will move forward without delay" in confirming a new Supreme Court justice to the seat of late justice women's rights pioneer Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

"My condolences to Justice Ginsburg's family and my regard for her lifelong dedication to public service," Cotton said of the justice, who is regarded as one of the lions of the legal profession and was the face of the liberal bloc of the Supreme Court.

"The Senate will exercise our constitutional duty," Cotton said, saying the Senate would process the nomination and hold hearings. "We will move forward without delay."

FILE - In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton has risen to the ranks of potential 2024 Republican presidential contenders by making all the right enemies. Now, the Arkansas lawmaker is making more by lining up behind President Donald Trump’s law and order recipe for controlling civic unrest (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)

FILE – In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton has risen to the ranks of potential 2024 Republican presidential contenders by making all the right enemies. Now, the Arkansas lawmaker is making more by lining up behind President Donald Trump’s law and order recipe for controlling civic unrest (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG DEAD AT 87

Asked whether a vote would happen before the presidential election, Cotton noted that it was possible, but not guaranteed.

"There will be a vote, there have been some cases like Justice Ginsburg herself" when the confirmation process "took less than 44 days," Cotton said. "There have been other cases which it took longer, so it's too soon to say right now."

Cotton was recently added to Trump's list of potential Supreme Court nominees, but is unlikely to be picked, as Trump has said he will choose a woman to replace Ginsburg. Two of the women currently perceived to be frontrunners are Amy Coney Barrett, a judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, and Barbara Lagoa, who sits on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Barrett, a former Notre Dame law professor and devout Catholic, gained cult-like popularity among religious leaning court-watchers after her contentious 2017 confirmation hearing for the 7th Circuit.

"The dogma lives loudly within you, and that's a concern," Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said at the time.

President Trump has said that he will nominate a person to fill Ginsburg's seat and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has sworn that nominee will get a Senate vote. Democrats, however, have said that the person elected president on Nov. 3 should make the selection. They've alluded that if they take the Senate and presidency they could bust the Senate legislative filibuster next year and pack the Supreme Court in retaliation if Republicans move ahead.

Original Article