Georgia GOP Gov. Kemp Launches Federal PAC

Georgia GOP Gov. Kemp Launches Federal PAC (Newsmax)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 27 November 2022 05:11 PM EST

Fresh off a resounding victory over Democrat firebrand Stacey Abrams, Georgia GOP Gov. Brian Kemp is taking his case to the nation, launching a federal political action committee fundraising apparatus.

The move suggests Kemp has plans to run for Senate when his term ends, which coincides with the 2026 reelection year for Sen. Jon Ossoff, D-Ga.

Kemp has been campaigning with Republican candidate Herschel Walker, who is seeking to unseat Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., in the Dec. 6 runoff. Early voting began Saturday.

Kemp filed to create Hardworking Americans Inc. PAC with the Federal Election Commission, Axios reported Sunday.

Kemp defeated former President Donald Trump's endorsed GOP gubernatorial primary candidate in Georgia – former Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga. – and Abrams, giving him political cachet with establishment GOP donors who might not back Democrats or Trump Republicans.

After having kept Walker at an arm's length in the Nov. 8 midterm election, Kemp and Walker have been campaigning together in Georgia for the first time in recent weeks.

"We're all in to help get Herschel over the goal line and keep Georgia red for years to come!" senior Kemp adviser Cody Hall told Axios.

Georgia GOP Gov. Kemp Launches Federal PAC

Georgia GOP Gov. Kemp Launches Federal PAC (Newsmax)

By Eric Mack | Sunday, 27 November 2022 05:11 PM EST

Fresh off a resounding victory over Democrat firebrand Stacey Abrams, Georgia GOP Gov. Brian Kemp is taking his case to the nation, launching a federal political action committee fundraising apparatus.

The move suggests Kemp has plans to run for Senate when his term ends, which coincides with the 2026 reelection year for Sen. Jon Ossoff, D-Ga.

Kemp has been campaigning with Republican candidate Herschel Walker, who is seeking to unseat Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., in the Dec. 6 runoff. Early voting began Saturday.

Kemp filed to create Hardworking Americans Inc. PAC with the Federal Election Commission, Axios reported Sunday.

Kemp defeated former President Donald Trump's endorsed GOP gubernatorial primary candidate in Georgia – former Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga. – and Abrams, giving him political cachet with establishment GOP donors who might not back Democrats or Trump Republicans.

After having kept Walker at an arm's length in the Nov. 8 midterm election, Kemp and Walker have been campaigning together in Georgia for the first time in recent weeks.

"We're all in to help get Herschel over the goal line and keep Georgia red for years to come!" senior Kemp adviser Cody Hall told Axios.

Original Article

Neil Chatterjee to Newsmax: WH Wants to Skip Straight to Non-Fossil Fuels

Neil Chatterjee to Newsmax: WH Wants to Skip Straight to Non-Fossil Fuels (Newsmax/"Wake Up America")

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Sunday, 27 November 2022 11:47 AM EST

Parts of the United States are facing the potential of rolling blackouts this winter because the Biden administration wants to "skip the transition part of the energy transition" to non-fossil fuels, and the end result of that is shortages, Neil Chatterjee, the chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission under former President Donald Trump, said on Newsmax's "Wake Up America" Sunday.

"We need more infrastructure in the United States," Chatterjee said. "We need permitting reform. We need to make it easier to build energy infrastructure in this country."

The United States, he said, is going through an "incredible energy transition" but without doing the work to make that process happen, the shortages become "really dangerous, when the power goes out when it's freezing cold outside."

Part of the issue is that the government "doesn't create anything," but it can block things, and 'that's what's happening right now," said Chatterjee. "My former colleagues at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission are making it harder to build natural gas pipelines in this country."

They are also making it harder to build liquefied natural gas export facilities, which would help Ukraine and other allies, he said.

"We need to make it easier to build things," he added. "You can incentivize new technology for sure. Congress just did that $369 billion in tax incentives for the clean energy transition, but we still have to build stuff. If we don't build transmission lines in this country to get that clean energy onto the grid, $9 billion might have just been might as well just been flushed down the toilet."

Meanwhile, the Biden administration is "going after American oil companies and demonizing them, while simultaneously trying to make nice with the Saudis and begging them to increase production because they're trying to satisfy their environmental base," said Chatterjee. "The reality of the situation is we do it cleaner and better than anyone else in the world. "If we increase domestic energy production, not only would it be good from an economics standpoint, from a national security standpoint, it's actually better for the environment as well."

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Original Article

Macron’s Visit to New Orleans First by a French Leader in 46 Years

Macron's Visit to New Orleans First by a French Leader in 46 Years

(Newsmax/"American Agenda")

By Sandy Fitzgerald | Saturday, 26 November 2022 06:22 PM EST

French President Emmanuel Macron is planning a visit to New Orleans and its famous French Quarter as part of his brief trip to the United States next week, marking the first time a president from France has visited the once-French city in 46 years.

Macron is planning a meeting with Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, where he and the Democrat leader will discuss climate issues, reports The Hill.

He is also scheduled to announce a fund that supports French-language education in schools in the United States.

During his first two days in the United States, however, Macron will be in Washington, D.C., for a state visit with President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and other top officials. He was last in the United States in 2018 while then-President Donald Trump was in office.

The state visit, from Nov. 30-Dec. 2, marks the first state visit during Biden's term in office, with discussions expected to range from the Russian invasion of Ukraine to trade and energy, reports The Advocate in New Orleans.

Macron and his wife Brigitte will attend a state dinner at the White House on Dec. 1 before heading to Louisiana, according to an administration announcement.

Macron will be only the third president from France to visit the country's former colony of Louisiana. Charles de Gaulle visited in 1941 and Valéry Giscard d’Estaing visited in 1976, reports Le Figaro, a French newspaper.

Original Article

Biden, Family Hit Nantucket Stores on ‘Small Business Saturday’

Biden, Family Hit Nantucket Stores on 'Small Business Saturday' (Newsmax)

DARLENE SUPERVILLE Saturday, 26 November 2022 06:15 PM EST

President Joe Biden went holiday shopping on the Massachusetts resort island where he spends Thanksgiving, patronizing smaller independently owned stores on what the retail industry has called "Small Business Saturday."

Biden, his wife, Jill, and daughter Ashley went from store to store on Main Street in downtown Nantucket, lingering at Polo Ralph Lauren, Murray's Toggery Shop and The Black Dog, among other establishments.

The president's son Hunter and his wife, Melissa, were also shopping with their 2-year-old son, Beau.

Biden emerged from The Black Dog holding a small brown paper shopping bag. The White House had no immediate comment on the president's purchases.

The retail industry came up with the moniker to help independent and locally owned business gain a share of the holiday shopping rush and to counter the markdowns and deeper discounts larger corporate retailers offer to drum up business on the day after Thanksgiving, known as Black Friday.

As Biden went from store to store, a reporter asked what he thought about a dinner meeting former President Donald Trump recently had at his Florida home with Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, and Nick Fuentes, a white nationalist.

Both of Trump's dinner guests have expressed anti-semitic views. Trump has said he did not know anything about Fuentes' background.

"You don't want to hear what I think," Biden replied. Biden has said such views have no place in America.

Biden also shopped in downtown Nantucket on Friday before the annual Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

Biden, Family Hit Nantucket Stores on ‘Small Business Saturday’

Biden, Family Hit Nantucket Stores on 'Small Business Saturday' (Newsmax)

DARLENE SUPERVILLE Saturday, 26 November 2022 06:15 PM EST

President Joe Biden went holiday shopping on the Massachusetts resort island where he spends Thanksgiving, patronizing smaller independently owned stores on what the retail industry has called "Small Business Saturday."

Biden, his wife, Jill, and daughter Ashley went from store to store on Main Street in downtown Nantucket, lingering at Polo Ralph Lauren, Murray's Toggery Shop and The Black Dog, among other establishments.

The president's son Hunter and his wife, Melissa, were also shopping with their 2-year-old son, Beau.

Biden emerged from The Black Dog holding a small brown paper shopping bag. The White House had no immediate comment on the president's purchases.

The retail industry came up with the moniker to help independent and locally owned business gain a share of the holiday shopping rush and to counter the markdowns and deeper discounts larger corporate retailers offer to drum up business on the day after Thanksgiving, known as Black Friday.

As Biden went from store to store, a reporter asked what he thought about a dinner meeting former President Donald Trump recently had at his Florida home with Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, and Nick Fuentes, a white nationalist.

Both of Trump's dinner guests have expressed anti-semitic views. Trump has said he did not know anything about Fuentes' background.

"You don't want to hear what I think," Biden replied. Biden has said such views have no place in America.

Biden also shopped in downtown Nantucket on Friday before the annual Christmas tree lighting ceremony.

Rep. Fleischmann to Newsmax: ‘Country Should Be Worried’ About Biden Border Policy

Rep. Fleischmann to Newsmax: 'Country Should Be Worried' About Biden Border Policy The House Appropriations Committee's Homeland Security Subcommittee ranking member Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN). (Chip Somodevilla/Getty)

By Charles Kim | Saturday, 26 November 2022 02:37 PM EST

Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, R- Tenn., told Newsmax Saturday that the country "should be worried" about President Joe Biden’s failed policies at the southern border and the incoming GOP House majority plans to use its financial power to address the record 4 million influx of illegal migrants when it takes control in January.

"I think [Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro] Mayorkas should be worried, the country should be worried," Fleischmann said during an appearance on "Saturday Report."

"The problem starts with Joe Biden and the Biden administration for [the last] two years."

According to Customs and Border Protection data, 1.9 million illegal immigrants entered the country in Fiscal Year 2021 followed by another 2.7 million in Fiscal Year 2022.

Almost 200,000 illegal migrants have entered the country since Oct. 1 when the new Fiscal Year started for 2023, the agency reported.

"For the last two years every attempt on my part as the ranking member of homeland security on appropriations, on the authorizers’ part to secure the border, whether that's with proper funding, proper technology, proper human resources, has been thwarted by Joe Biden," he said. "The calls are coming from the top all the way down. They are failing, the border is porous. It's been porous. It's going to get worse."

He said things will change when the new majority is sworn in.

"At every step, at every turn, Joe Biden has thwarted border security," he said. "It's border security, it’s national security. It's a failure of immigration policy. Don't look for them to change any time soon. House Republicans will change [this] with the power of the purse. I'm an appropriator, and. we're going to make sure that we direct spending in the appropriate way. We're going to have to stand firm now."

Fleischmann said that under former President Donald Trump the border was secure, having a buffer with the "remain in Mexico" policy that made illegal migrants wait in Mexico for their court cases before staying on American soil.

"The buffer in Mexico policy, which was working under President Trump, making sure that illegals who were in those countries had to wait in another country before they could come in," he said. "The Biden administration wants open, porous borders. They think there's a political gain to this. There is not. It is long term problems. It is short term problem. This will cost our country for decades. I just don't know what their endgame is. It's chaotic. It's wrong. It's hurting the national security of this country, and it's got to stop."

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Original Article

Musk: Twitter Corrected ‘Grave Mistake’ Banning Trump

Musk: Twitter Corrected 'Grave Mistake' Banning Trump (Newsmax)

Kanishka Singh Saturday, 26 November 2022 02:22 PM EST

Twitter's ban on then President Donald Trump after the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol by his supporters was a "grave mistake" that had to be corrected, CEO Elon Musk said Friday, although he also stated that incitement to violence would continue to be prohibited on Twitter.

"I'm fine with Trump not tweeting," Musk tweeted. "The important thing is that Twitter correct a grave mistake in banning his account, despite no violation of the law or terms of service.

"Deplatforming a sitting president undermined public trust in Twitter for half of America."

In another thread, Musk vowed to support Ron DeSantis in 2024 if the Florida governor, who recently coasted to a second term, were to run for president.

Last week, Musk announced the reactivation of Trump's account after a slim majority voted in a Twitter poll in favor of reinstating Trump, who said, however, he had no interest in returning to Twitter. He added he would stick with his own social media site Truth Social, the app developed by Trump Media & Technology Group.

Republican Trump, who 11 days ago announced he was running for election again in 2024, was banned Jan. 8, 2021, from Twitter under its previous owners.

At the time, Twitter said it permanently suspended him because of the risk of further incitement of violence following the storming of the Capitol. The results of the November 2020 presidential election won by Democrat Joe Biden were being certified by lawmakers when the Capitol was attacked after weeks of false claims by Trump that he had won.

Trump repeatedly used Twitter and other sites to claim there had been widespread voter fraud, and had urged supporters to march on the Capitol in Washington to protest.

Earlier Friday, Musk tweeted that calling for violence or incitement to violence on Twitter would result in suspension, after saying Thursday that Twitter would provide a "general amnesty" to suspended accounts that had not broken the law or engaged in spam.

Replying to a tweet, Musk said it was "very concerning" Twitter had taken no action earlier to remove some accounts related to the far-left Antifa movement. In response to another tweet asking if Musk considered the statement "trans people deserve to die" as worthy of suspension from the platform, the billionaire said: "Absolutely."

Musk Supporting DeSantis

DeSantis earlier this month defeated Democrat opponent Charlie Crist by nearly 20 percentage points to be re-elected as Florida governor and cemented himself as the Republican Party's top rising star.

Political pundits have been doling out high marks to DeSantis, who is seen as a potential challenger to former president Donald Trump in the 2024 field of Republican presidential candidates. Trump announced 10 days ago he was running for election again in 2024.

"My preference for the 2024 presidency is someone sensible and centrist. I had hoped that would the case for the Biden administration, but have been disappointed so far," Musk said on Twitter.

"Yes," he replied in a tweet when asked if he would support DeSantis in 2024.

"As a reminder, I was a significant supporter of the Obama-Biden presidency and (reluctantly) voted for Biden over Trump," the Twitter owner said.

Musk had previously said in June he was leaning toward supporting DeSantis for president in 2024, and added the Florida governor would easily defeat Biden in the election.

When asked back then about Musk's support, DeSantis joked, "I welcome support from African-Americans, what can I say." Musk, who is white, grew up in South Africa.

DeSantis is especially popular with conservatives for taking the lead on culture war issues concerning race and gender. His governorship has been marked by his rejection of pandemic-related health restrictions, passage of a law limiting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools, and a feud with Walt Disney over the law.

Musk urged Americans to elect a Republican Congress in the U.S. midterm elections earlier this month to counterbalance Biden's Democrats. However, the Democrats defied Republican hopes for a "red wave" in the midterms and retained control of the Senate while the Republicans only won a narrow majority in the House of Representatives.

Original Article

Musk: Twitter Corrected ‘Grave Mistake’ Banning Trump

Musk: Twitter Corrected 'Grave Mistake' Banning Trump (Newsmax)

Kanishka Singh Saturday, 26 November 2022 02:22 PM EST

Twitter's ban on then President Donald Trump after the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol by his supporters was a "grave mistake" that had to be corrected, CEO Elon Musk said Friday, although he also stated that incitement to violence would continue to be prohibited on Twitter.

"I'm fine with Trump not tweeting," Musk tweeted. "The important thing is that Twitter correct a grave mistake in banning his account, despite no violation of the law or terms of service.

"Deplatforming a sitting president undermined public trust in Twitter for half of America."

In another thread, Musk vowed to support Ron DeSantis in 2024 if the Florida governor, who recently coasted to a second term, were to run for president.

Last week, Musk announced the reactivation of Trump's account after a slim majority voted in a Twitter poll in favor of reinstating Trump, who said, however, he had no interest in returning to Twitter. He added he would stick with his own social media site Truth Social, the app developed by Trump Media & Technology Group.

Republican Trump, who 11 days ago announced he was running for election again in 2024, was banned Jan. 8, 2021, from Twitter under its previous owners.

At the time, Twitter said it permanently suspended him because of the risk of further incitement of violence following the storming of the Capitol. The results of the November 2020 presidential election won by Democrat Joe Biden were being certified by lawmakers when the Capitol was attacked after weeks of false claims by Trump that he had won.

Trump repeatedly used Twitter and other sites to claim there had been widespread voter fraud, and had urged supporters to march on the Capitol in Washington to protest.

Earlier Friday, Musk tweeted that calling for violence or incitement to violence on Twitter would result in suspension, after saying Thursday that Twitter would provide a "general amnesty" to suspended accounts that had not broken the law or engaged in spam.

Replying to a tweet, Musk said it was "very concerning" Twitter had taken no action earlier to remove some accounts related to the far-left Antifa movement. In response to another tweet asking if Musk considered the statement "trans people deserve to die" as worthy of suspension from the platform, the billionaire said: "Absolutely."

Musk Supporting DeSantis

DeSantis earlier this month defeated Democrat opponent Charlie Crist by nearly 20 percentage points to be re-elected as Florida governor and cemented himself as the Republican Party's top rising star.

Political pundits have been doling out high marks to DeSantis, who is seen as a potential challenger to former president Donald Trump in the 2024 field of Republican presidential candidates. Trump announced 10 days ago he was running for election again in 2024.

"My preference for the 2024 presidency is someone sensible and centrist. I had hoped that would the case for the Biden administration, but have been disappointed so far," Musk said on Twitter.

"Yes," he replied in a tweet when asked if he would support DeSantis in 2024.

"As a reminder, I was a significant supporter of the Obama-Biden presidency and (reluctantly) voted for Biden over Trump," the Twitter owner said.

Musk had previously said in June he was leaning toward supporting DeSantis for president in 2024, and added the Florida governor would easily defeat Biden in the election.

When asked back then about Musk's support, DeSantis joked, "I welcome support from African-Americans, what can I say." Musk, who is white, grew up in South Africa.

DeSantis is especially popular with conservatives for taking the lead on culture war issues concerning race and gender. His governorship has been marked by his rejection of pandemic-related health restrictions, passage of a law limiting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools, and a feud with Walt Disney over the law.

Musk urged Americans to elect a Republican Congress in the U.S. midterm elections earlier this month to counterbalance Biden's Democrats. However, the Democrats defied Republican hopes for a "red wave" in the midterms and retained control of the Senate while the Republicans only won a narrow majority in the House of Representatives.

Newsom: I Won’t Challenge Biden in ’24

Newsom: I Won't Challenge Biden in '24 Newsom: I Won't Challenge Biden in '24 US President Joe Biden is greeted by California Governor Gavin Newsom as he disembarks from Air Force One upon arrival at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego, California, November 3, 2022, during a 4-day campaign trip ahead of next week's midterm elections. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty)

By Nick Koutsobinas | Saturday, 26 November 2022 12:33 PM EST

California Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom will not challenge President Joe Biden for the 2024 presidential Democratic nomination.

"I've told everyone in the White House, from the chief of staff to the first lady," Newsom told Politico, adding that he "enthusiastically" supports Biden running again and believes he could "beat" former President Donald Trump "again."

Still, Biden, who turned 80 on Sunday, has made no formal announcements about a reelection campaign but has said he intends to run. According to CBS News, early exit polls conducted on Nov. 8 showed two-thirds of voters opposed Biden running in 2024.

When asked by CNN's Don Lemon in June if Biden "has the stamina, physically and mentally" to run in 2024, a laughing White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre responded, "Don, you're asking me this question? … I can't even keep up with him … That is not a question that we should be even asking. Just look at the work that he does."

Original Article

Dick Morris to Newsmax: Dem Voters on the Dole ‘Insulated’ on Inflation

Dick Morris to Newsmax: Dem Voters on the Dole 'Insulated' on Inflation (Newsmax/"Saturday Report")

By Eric Mack | Saturday, 26 November 2022 12:38 PM EST

While inflation hurts most of us, Democrat voters on government support are "insulated" from it – a scheme of dependency and virtual control – according to presidential campaign adviser Dick Morris on Newsmax.

"What they're doing is borrowing like crazy, spending like crazy, knowing that that will cause inflation and then protecting their constituencies so that there are on protected islands in this frothing sea of inflation," Morris told "Saturday Report." "And to get on the island, you need to vote Democrat; you need to be part of the constituency, and that's a way to insulate their voters from what's happening to the rest of us, and I think that played important role."

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Americans for Limited Government President Rick Manning and his associate Robert Romano studied Americans impacted by inflation for Morris, former President Donald Trump's presidential campaign adviser told host Rita Cosby.

"They found that 37% of Americans are essentially insulated from inflation – by cost of living adjustments in their social security checks, their food stamps, their disability benefits or in their private employment," Morris told Cosby. "And that – while the two thirds of us that are not take inflation on the chin and we hate it and it really crimps our lives for them – for them, it's a minor annoyance, because they get it back at the end of the year with an increase of their benefit checks.

"This puts the idea of what the Democrats are doing into a new perspective – from me at least."

Morris hailed Trump's 30-point lead over Florida GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis in a recent poll, saying, DeSantis is "probably going to choose to keep his powder dry and not run."

"He has a clear choice: He has an option of running in 2028, and winning the nomination, and probably winning the election and having eight years to serve as president; or running in 2024 and run into the teeth of a meat grinder," Morris said.

"And I predicted in my book, "The Return: Trump's Big 2024 Comeback," exactly how Trump will go about winning, what his plan is, the way he will put together a majority, the way he'll get the Latino vote, blue-collar white vote, the way he will challenge the Democrats and RINO Republicans in key states, and why, as a former president, he has an argument for his candidacy that nobody else has."

Morris pitched his book "The Return: Trump's Big 2024 Comeback" as a holiday shopping season prize.

"It's in red already, so you don't have to wrap it for Christmas, but it would be a great present," he told Cosby.

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Original Article

Dick Morris to Newsmax: Dem Voters on the Dole ‘Insulated’ on Inflation

Dick Morris to Newsmax: Dem Voters on the Dole 'Insulated' on Inflation (Newsmax/"Saturday Report")

By Eric Mack | Saturday, 26 November 2022 12:38 PM EST

While inflation hurts most of us, Democrat voters on government support are "insulated" from it – a scheme of dependency and virtual control – according to presidential campaign adviser Dick Morris on Newsmax.

"What they're doing is borrowing like crazy, spending like crazy, knowing that that will cause inflation and then protecting their constituencies so that there are on protected islands in this frothing sea of inflation," Morris told "Saturday Report." "And to get on the island, you need to vote Democrat; you need to be part of the constituency, and that's a way to insulate their voters from what's happening to the rest of us, and I think that played important role."

Urgent: Dick Morris predicted a DOJ attack on Trump after he announced. Now his bestselling "The Return" warns of more troubles. Get this book with FREE Offer and Save $28! See Offer Here Now

Americans for Limited Government President Rick Manning and his associate Robert Romano studied Americans impacted by inflation for Morris, former President Donald Trump's presidential campaign adviser told host Rita Cosby.

"They found that 37% of Americans are essentially insulated from inflation – by cost of living adjustments in their social security checks, their food stamps, their disability benefits or in their private employment," Morris told Cosby. "And that – while the two thirds of us that are not take inflation on the chin and we hate it and it really crimps our lives for them – for them, it's a minor annoyance, because they get it back at the end of the year with an increase of their benefit checks.

"This puts the idea of what the Democrats are doing into a new perspective – from me at least."

Morris hailed Trump's 30-point lead over Florida GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis in a recent poll, saying, DeSantis is "probably going to choose to keep his powder dry and not run."

"He has a clear choice: He has an option of running in 2028, and winning the nomination, and probably winning the election and having eight years to serve as president; or running in 2024 and run into the teeth of a meat grinder," Morris said.

"And I predicted in my book, "The Return: Trump's Big 2024 Comeback," exactly how Trump will go about winning, what his plan is, the way he will put together a majority, the way he'll get the Latino vote, blue-collar white vote, the way he will challenge the Democrats and RINO Republicans in key states, and why, as a former president, he has an argument for his candidacy that nobody else has."

Morris pitched his book "The Return: Trump's Big 2024 Comeback" as a holiday shopping season prize.

"It's in red already, so you don't have to wrap it for Christmas, but it would be a great present," he told Cosby.

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Emboldened Biden, Dems Push Ban on So-Called Assault Weapons

Emboldened Biden, Dems Push Ban on So-Called Assault Weapons a silencer at the end of a gun (Dreamstime)

COLLEEN LONG, MARY CLARE JALONICK and LINDSAY WHITEHURST Friday, 25 November 2022 07:20 PM EST

When President Joe Biden speaks about the "scourge" of gun violence, his go-to answer is to zero in on so-called assault weapons.

America has heard it hundreds of times, including this week after shootings in Colorado and Virginia: The president wants to sign into law a ban on high-powered guns that have the capacity to kill many people very quickly.

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"The idea we still allow semi-automatic weapons to be purchased is sick. Just sick," Biden said Thanksgiving Day. "I'm going to try to get rid of assault weapons."

After the mass killing last Saturday at a gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, he said in a statement: "When will we decide we've had enough? … We need to enact an assault weapons ban to get weapons of war off America's streets."

When Biden and other lawmakers talk about "assault weapons," they are using an inexact term to describe a group of high-powered guns or semi-automatic long rifles, like an AR-15, that can fire 30 rounds fast without reloading. By comparison, New York Police Department officers carry a handgun that shoots about half that much.

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A weapons ban is far off in a closely divided Congress. But Biden and the Democrats have become increasingly emboldened in pushing for stronger gun controls — and doing so with no clear electoral consequences.

The Democratic-led House passed legislation in July to revive a 1990s-era ban on "assault weapons," with Biden's vocal support. And the president pushed a ban nearly everywhere that he campaigned this year.

Still, in the midterm elections, Democrats kept control of the Senate and Republicans were only able to claim the slimmest House majority in two decades.

The tough talk follows passage in June of a landmark bipartisan bill on gun laws, and it reflects steady progress that gun control advocates have been making in recent years.

"I think the American public has been waiting for this message," said Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who has been the Senate's leading advocate for stronger gun control since the massacre of 20 children at a school in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012. "There has been a thirst from voters, especially swing voters, young voters, parents, to hear candidates talk about gun violence, and I think Democrats are finally sort of catching up with where the public has been."

Just over half of voters want to see nationwide gun policy made more strict, according to AP VoteCast, an extensive survey of more than 94,000 voters nationwide conducted for The Associated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago. About 3 in 10 want gun policy kept as is. Only 14% prefer looser gun laws.

There are clear partisan divides. About 9 in 10 Democrats want stricter gun laws, compared with about 3 in 10 Republicans. About half of Republicans want gun laws left as they are and only one-quarter want to see gun laws be made less strict.

Once banned in the United States, the high-powered firearms are now the weapon of choice among young men responsible for many of the most devastating mass shootings. Congress allowed the restrictions first put in place in 1994 on the manufacture and sales of the weapons to expire a decade later, unable to muster the political support to counter the powerful gun lobby and reinstate the weapons ban.

When he was governor of Florida, current Republican Sen. Rick Scott signed gun control laws in the wake of mass shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and a night club in Orlando. But he has consistently opposed weapons bans, arguing like many of his Republican colleagues that most gun owners use them lawfully.

"People are doing the right thing, why would we take away their weapons?" Scott asked as the Senate was negotiating gun legislation last summer. "It doesn't make any sense."

He said more mental health counseling, assessments of troubled students and law enforcement on campus make more sense.

"Let's focus on things that actually would change something," Scott said.

Law enforcement officials have long called for stricter gun laws, arguing that the availability of these weapons makes people less safe and makes their jobs more dangerous.

Mike Moore, chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, the country's third-largest, said it just makes sense to talk about guns when gun violence is rising nationwide, and consider what the government can do to make the streets safer. He is grateful Biden is bringing it up so much.

"This isn't a one-and-done," Moore said of the shooting in Colorado Springs. "These things are evolving all the time, in other cities, at any moment another incident happens. It's crying out for the federal government, for our legislators, to go out and make this change," he said.

On Tuesday, six people were shot dead at a Walmart in Virginia. Over the past six months there has been a supermarket shooting in Buffalo, New York; a massacre of school children in Uvalde, Texas; and the July Fourth killing of revelers in Highland Park, Illinois.

The legislation that Biden signed in June will, among other things, help states put in place "red flag" laws that make it easier for authorities to take weapons from people judged to be dangerous.

But a ban was never on the table.

A 60-vote threshold in the Senate means some Republicans must be on board. Most are are steadfastly opposed, arguing it would be too complicated, especially as sales and varieties of the firearms have proliferated. There are many more types of these high-powered guns today than in 1994, when the ban was signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

"I'd rather not try to define a whole group of guns as being no longer available to the American public," said Sen. Mike Rounds, R-S.D., who is a hunter and owns several guns, some of them passed down through his family. "For those of us who have grown up with guns as part of our culture, and we use them as tools — there's millions of us, there's hundreds of millions of us — that use them lawfully."

In many states where the bans have been enacted, the restrictions are being challenged in court, gaining strength from a Supreme Court ruling in June expanding gun rights.

"We feel pretty confident, even despite the arguments made by the other side, that history and tradition as well as the text of the Second Amendment are on our side," said David Warrington, chairman and general counsel for the National Association for Gun Rights.

Biden was instrumental in helping secure the 1990s ban as a senator. The White House said that while it was in place, mass shootings declined, and when it expired in 2004, shootings tripled.

The reality is complicated. The data on the effectiveness is mixed and there is a sense that other measures that are not as politically fraught might actually be more effective, said Robert Spitzer, a political science professor at the State University of New York-Cortland and author of "The Politics of Gun Control."

Politically, the ban sparked a backlash, even though the final law was a compromise version of the initial bill, he said.

"The gun community was furious," Spitzer said.

The ban has been blamed in some circles for the Democrats losing control of Congress in 1994, though subsequent research has shown that the loss was likely more about strong, well-funded conservative candidates and district boundaries, Spitzer said.

Still, after Democrat Al Gore, who supported stricter gun laws, lost the 2000 White House race to Republican George W. Bush, Democrats largely backed off the issue until the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. Even after that, it was not a campaign topic until the 2018 midterms.

Now, gun control advocates see progress.

"The fact that the American people elected a president who has long been a vocal and steadfast supporter of bold gun safety laws — and recently reelected a gun sense majority to the Senate — says everything you need to know about how dramatically the politics on this issue have shifted," said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety.

Doctor: Eat Red Meat to Protect Your Liver, Get Liver-Detoxifying Omega-3s

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Mexican President López Obrador Hints of Biden Visit in January

Mexican President López Obrador Hints of Biden Visit in January Mexican President López Obrador Hints of Biden Visit in January Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador reviews the honor guard at the Revolution Palace in Havana, Cuba, on May 8, 2022. (Yamil Lage/AFP via Getty Images)

By Jay Clemons | Friday, 25 November 2022 04:54 PM EST

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador dropped hints Friday of President Joe Biden making a formal visit to Mexico in January.

While speaking to reporters, López Obrador suggested that Jan. 9-10, 2023, would be the target dates of Biden coming to Mexico City, as a means of attending the North American Leaders' Summit, which will include Canada.

The summit had initially been scheduled for December. However, those plans fell through, according to White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre.

"We're still working through plans for the next North Americans Leaders' Summit and have no travel announcement to make at this time," said Jean-Pierre in mid-October.

Neither the White House nor Canadian officials have yet to confirm any dates for a possible Biden-Mexico visit, according to The Hill.

Prior to the Trump administration, the U.S., Mexico and Canada prioritized meeting annually for a round of talks.

In November 2021, Biden hosted Mexico's López Obrador and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for a summit meeting in Washington, D.C.

In June, López Obrador boycotted the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, reportedly due to the Biden administration's refusal to invite the leaders of Cuba and Nicaragua, along with representatives of the Nicolás Maduro government in Venezuela — which the U.S. government does not formally recognize.

One month later, though, López Obrador visited the White House for a bilateral meeting, with the discussions reportedly covering the proliferation of lethal drugs, such as fentanyl, wreaking havoc on both countries, along with immigration policies.

And in April, the Biden and López Obrador administrations were seemingly at odds over the White House's energy policies.

According to ForeignPolicy.com, Biden officials wanted to increase state control of Mexico's electric power market from 38% to 54% — a move that would have amounted to "the biggest conflict yet" between Mexico and the U.S., under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

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Trump: Ye And I Had ‘Quick And Uneventful’ Dinner

Trump: Ye And I Had 'Quick And Uneventful' Dinner (Newsmax)

By Charlie McCarthy | Friday, 25 November 2022 02:55 PM EST

Former President Donald Trump says he had a "quick and uneventful" dinner with musical artist Ye earlier this week.

Trump posted on Truth Social after it was reported that Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, claimed the former president "started screaming" at him during dinner at Mar-a-Lago. Ye added that Trump said the rapper would lose if he ran for president.

"This past week, Kanye West called me to have dinner at Mar-a-Lago," Trump posted Friday afternoon. "Shortly thereafter, he unexpectedly showed up with three of his friends, whom I knew nothing about.

"We had dinner on Tuesday evening with many members present on the back patio. The dinner was quick and uneventful. They then left for the airport."

Ye last week announced plans to run for president in 2024 following a failed bid in 2020.

On Tuesday, Ye tweeted: "First time at Mar-a-Lago Rain and traffic Can't believe I kept President Trump waiting And I had on jeans Yikes What you guys think his response was when I asked him to be my running mate in 2024?"

On Thursday, Ye posted a video of him speaking of his meeting with the former president.

"I think the thing that Trump was most perturbed about [was] me asking him to be my vice president. I think that was lower on the list of things that caught him off guard," Ye says in the video.

Ye later says that during dinner, "Trump started basically screaming at me at the table telling me I was going to lose. I mean has that ever worked for anyone in history?"

Ye added, "I'm like whoa hold on, hold on, hold on. You're talking to Ye."

Earlier this month, Trump described Ye's recent comments about Jews as "rough." The rapper repeatedly has made antisemitic comments and promoted conspiracy theories.

"He made some statements, rough statements, on Jewish [people]," Trump said during an interview with conservative podcaster Chris Stigall.

Trump suggested to Stigall that Ye was being punished for supporting the former president.

"So then you ask, Well, would it have been the same thing if he didn't say all those good things about Trump?" he asked. "You know, you just don't know."

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GOP Strategists Outline Challenges for DeSantis White House Bid

GOP Strategists Outline Challenges for DeSantis White House Bid (Newsmax)

By Theodore Bunker | Friday, 25 November 2022 02:28 PM EST

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has emerged as one of the front-runners for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination, but GOP strategists note that he would face several challenges if he were to run.

Martin Sweet, who teaches political science at Purdue University, told The Hill that DeSantis' personality could turn off voters, especially in early primary states where voters "really want those up-close, multiple-times visits. Lots of people want to look under the hood and kick the tires. Can he do that low-level persuasion?"

He added, "DeSantis emotes a lot less than other prospective candidates and might have some trouble."

One Republican supporter, who was not named, told the Hill that DeSantis is " 'angry guy at the podium' all the time. It's always 'own the libs.' "

Sweet also noted that DeSantis may not want to face off against former President Donald Trump, who has already announced his intent to run in 2024.

DeSantis "has everything to lose and nothing to gain," Sweet said. "Why piss off the Trump base right now?"

Another difficulty is his lack of experience running for national office. Longtime GOP strategist Keith Naughton noted, "DeSantis has never run nationally before. He's going to do some dumb things at some point."

He added, "From the polling we've seen in Florida, where people know him and recognize him, it tells me that when DeSantis actually starts introducing himself to voters elsewhere, he's got a lot of room to grow."

DeSantis could also face a backlash over his policy positions, which one Florida GOP veteran said "aren't all that different from Donald Trump's. So I think if we're going to have a conversation about Trump's electability, his appeal to the electorate as a whole, there's gotta be a similar conversation about DeSantis."

The strategist added, "Personality-wise, I think [DeSantis] comes off as more in control, more restrained. But again, there's not a lot of daylight between him and Trump when it comes to the issues."

Original Article

MyPillow Founder Lindell Weighs Run for RNC Chair

MyPillow Founder Lindell Weighs Run for RNC Chair (Newsmax)

By Solange Reyner | Friday, 25 November 2022 02:11 PM EST

MyPillow founder Mike Lindell reportedly is considering challenging Ronna McDaniel for her role as Republican National Committee chair because she has "failed in her leadership" and because the party needs "new input to get a different output."

"One of the things I will tell you, [we] will never, ever stop to get rid of these machines and make this the best elections in world history in our country," Lindell said during his "Frank TV" livestream this week in reference to his claims that voting machine tampering cost former President Donald Trump the 2020 election. "We need someone, everybody, and I would step into that, God willing."

Lindell also told National File that Republicans "need someone who knows how to run a business to lead one of the most important organizations in our country."

Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., is also considering calls for him to mount a challenge against McDaniel.

"It is time for our party to retool, transform, win back the Presidency in 2024, expand our number of Republican held seats in Congress, and elect the maximum number of down ballot races across the country," Zeldin wrote in a letter to the RNC last Thursday. "The Republican Party needs to be all in to do everything in its power to save America."

McDaniel previously told RNC members that she intends to run for reelection, and sources told Politico that she has already secured the support of a majority of the committee's members.

Zeldin, who recently lost his attempt to unseat New York Democrat Gov. Kathy Hochul, wrote in his message: "Not only should the Republican Party compete in all 50 states, and ensure we are driving up turnout within our base, but we also need to go to all communities no matter how blue they are, show up often, build relationships, and advance our proposals on education, upward economic mobility, housing, mental health, public safety, and more.

"This means making sure people know what we stand for, and not just what we are against."

Original Article

Rep. Jordan: Jack Smith Sought to Prosecute Innocent Americans

Rep. Jordan: Jack Smith Sought to Prosecute Innocent Americans (Newsmax)

By Theodore Bunker | Friday, 25 November 2022 12:34 PM EST

Jack Smith, the recently appointed special counsel investigating former President Donald Trump, "was looking for ways to prosecute the innocent Americans that Lois Lerner targeted during the IRS scandal," Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, told the Washington Examiner.

According to the Examiner, Smith might have provided the impetus for the IRS sending nonprofit tax records to the FBI by telling officials to contact Lois Lerner, the former director of the IRS Exempt Organizations Unit who became embroiled in a scandal over investigations into Tea Party groups and other conservative nonprofits.

Smith previously said in testimony that while his office "had a dialogue with the FBI," it "never opened any investigations" into those groups.

Jordan previously criticized Smith's appointment during an interview with Fox News, saying: "Merrick Garland says we're going to put in as the special counsel the very individual who was at the Justice Department and was looking for ways to prosecute the people Lois Lerner and Obama's IRS targeted."

Jordan added: "If that's not a political Justice Department, I don't know what is. So this is why we're going to look into this issue. And we're going to get to the bottom of everything they've been doing at the politicized DOJ."

Original Article

Rep. Jordan: Jack Smith Sought to Prosecute Innocent Americans

Rep. Jordan: Jack Smith Sought to Prosecute Innocent Americans (Newsmax)

By Theodore Bunker | Friday, 25 November 2022 12:34 PM EST

Jack Smith, the recently appointed special counsel investigating former President Donald Trump, "was looking for ways to prosecute the innocent Americans that Lois Lerner targeted during the IRS scandal," Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, told the Washington Examiner.

According to the Examiner, Smith might have provided the impetus for the IRS sending nonprofit tax records to the FBI by telling officials to contact Lois Lerner, the former director of the IRS Exempt Organizations Unit who became embroiled in a scandal over investigations into Tea Party groups and other conservative nonprofits.

Smith previously said in testimony that while his office "had a dialogue with the FBI," it "never opened any investigations" into those groups.

Jordan previously criticized Smith's appointment during an interview with Fox News, saying: "Merrick Garland says we're going to put in as the special counsel the very individual who was at the Justice Department and was looking for ways to prosecute the people Lois Lerner and Obama's IRS targeted."

Jordan added: "If that's not a political Justice Department, I don't know what is. So this is why we're going to look into this issue. And we're going to get to the bottom of everything they've been doing at the politicized DOJ."

Ye: Trump ‘Started Screaming’ in Mar-a-Lago Meeting

Ye: Trump 'Started Screaming' in Mar-a-Lago Meeting (Newsmax)

By Theodore Bunker | Friday, 25 November 2022 10:23 AM EST

Musical artist Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, said this week that former President Donald Trump "started screaming" at him during dinner at Mar-a-Lago, saying Ye would lose if he ran for president.

The rapper announced his intention to run for the White House earlier this week after an unsuccessful bid in 2019. He met with Trump on Wednesday, saying in a tweet: "First time at Mar-a-Lago Rain and traffic Can’t believe I kept President Trump waiting And I had on jeans Yikes What you guys think his response was when I asked him to be my running mate in 2024?"

In a video released on Twitter, Ye says that Trump was "perturbed" by his offer, which he noted was "lower on the list of things that caught him off guard."

Ye later said in the video that during dinner, "Trump started basically screaming at me at the table telling me I was going to lose," adding, "I mean has that ever worked for anyone in history?"

Ye said, "I'm like whoa hold on, hold on, hold on. You're talking to Ye."

Ye met with Trump at Mar-a-Lago on the same day that Nick Fuentes, who has been described as a white supremacist by the Justice Department after attending the deadly 2017 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, was also seen at Trump’s resort, and the two were spotted arriving together at a Miami airport by the group Right Wing Watch.

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