Afghanistan marketplace explosion kills at least 10, injures 5

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani holds up the resolution on the last day of an Afghan Loya Jirga or traditional council, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. (AP Photo)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 3:10 PM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

At least 10 people are dead after an explosive device went off in a busy Afghan marketplace. According to reports, two civilians were killed and five police officers were injured after a hidden mine detonated.

Security personnel had reportedly been trying to diffuse the device before it went off.

“Suddenly an explosion happened on the other side of the road. A lot of people were saved by the police, as they already knew about explosives, but still, five people were wounded. Two women and policemen were among the casualties.” – Mohammad Hakim, witness

The area’s recent spike in violence has largely been blamed on Islamic State affiliates, who are still fighting against U.S. and Afghan forces in the country. One Defense Department official has reportedly said Washington, D.C. considers the Islamic State to be the biggest threat in Afghanistan.

American military convoy stops near the town of Tel Tamr, north Syria, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Baderkhan Ahmad)

Earlier on Sunday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper announced the U.S. will be withdrawing a number of troops from the region amid the ongoing peace process there. During an interview, he confirmed U.S. forces in Afghanistan will reduce to below 5,000 troops by November.

According to Esper, the Afghan government is slowly advancing talks with the Taliban, which will reduce terror threats to the U.S.

The secretary added his department will soon brief Congress on the latest drawdown.

This came after Kabul vowed to release 400 Taliban prisoners to advance political settlement in Afghanistan.

RELATED: Afghanistan Releases Taliban Prisoners As Part Of Ceasefire

Original Article

Hillary Clinton bashes Trump’s executive orders as ‘a stunt’ and ‘a big diversion’

closeHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’Video

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joins Chris Wallace with insight on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Hillary Clinton joined the chorus of Democrats blasting President Trump’s executive orders on Saturday – calling them “a stunt” and “unconstitutional.”

Clinton, the 2016 Democrat presidential nominee, weighed in on Trump’s executive orders during an appearance on MSNBC’s “AM Joy.”

“It's a stunt,” she said. "There's no doubt about it, it's most likely, as even Republican senators have said, unconstitutional, bypassing the Congress, trying to spend money that he has no authority to direct."

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS?

She added: “It's also meant to be a big diversion from the hard work that Congress should be engaged in to provide the kind of relief that tens of millions of Americans need.”

Trump’s executive orders, which have been widely panned by Democrats and even some Republicans, followed the collapse of negotiations with Congress on a new coronavirus rescue package. In bypassing Congress, Trump deferred payroll taxes and replace an expired unemployment benefit with a lower amount.

Trump's orders encroached on Congress' control of federal spending and seemed likely to be met with legal challenges. The president cast his actions as necessary given that lawmakers have been unable to reach an agreement to plunge more money into the stumbling economy, which has imperiled his November reelection.

Trump moved to continue paying a supplemental federal unemployment benefit for millions of Americans out of work during the outbreak. However, his order called for up to $400 payments each week, one-third less than the $600 people had been receiving. How many people would receive the benefit and how long it might take to arrive were open questions.

The previous unemployment benefit, which expired on Aug. 1, was fully funded by Washington, but Trump is asking states to now cover 25 percent. He is seeking to set aside $44 billion in previously approved disaster aid to help states, but said it would be up to states to determine how much, if any of it, to fund, so the benefits could be smaller still.

Many states already faced budget shortfalls due to the coronavirus pandemic and would have difficulty assuming the new obligation.

Trump hopes the four executive orders he signed will signal to Americans that he is acting where Congress will not to address economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has upended nearly all aspects of American life. It's unclear what the economic impact of his actions will be, and his orders do not address several areas that have been part of the congressional negotiations, including funding for schools and state and local governments.

US surpasses 5M coronavirus casesVideo

While the orders were roundly dismissed by Democrats – with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., calling them “meager” – they also saw opposition from some Republican critics of Trump.

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The use of executive actions drew criticism from Republican Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska.

“The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop," said Sasse, a member of the Senate's Judiciary and Finance panels. He added that Trump "does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law. Under the Constitution, that power belongs to the American people acting through their members of Congress.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Coronavirus negotiation ‘makes me wonder’ if Democrats want to tank economy: Navarro

closeHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’Video

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joins Chris Wallace with insight on 'Fox News Sunday.'

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Sunday that he's beginning to wonder if Democrats are purposely stalling coronavirus stimulus negotiations to tank the economy in an attempt to make President Trump look bad.

"There is this theory, Chuck, that the Democrats would prefer to see the economy go into the tank for another 90 days because that harms the president," Navarro told Chuck Todd on Sunday in an interview on "Meet the Press." "I hope that Capitol Hill hasn't become that cynical. But watching these negotiations makes me wonder, because we've been willing to bend."

PELOSI SLAMS TRUMP'S EXECUTIVE ACTIONS AS AN 'ILLUSION' IN 'FOX NEWS SUNDAY' INTERVIEW

Talks have been stalled for weeks as Democrats have asked for more than $3 trillion in the relief bill while Republicans are looking for a narrower package around $1 trillion. Democrats on Thursday offered to lower their request by $1 trillion if Republicans were to increase their proposal by $1 trillion. However, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday the idea was a "non-starter."

Meanwhile, President Trump signed four executive orders on Saturday aimed at providing Americans with ongoing relief until a deal can be reached, including a $400-per-week supplemental unemployment payment for out-of-work Americans, an extension of student loan relief, protections from evictions for renters and homeowners, and a payroll tax holiday through the end of the year for Americans earning less than $100,000.

MCCARTHY BLAMES PELOSI'S 'PERSONAL WISH LIST' FOR CORONAVIRUS STIMULUS BILL FAILURE

Pelosi slammed the executive orders and Republicans' reluctance to meet the $2 trillion number during an interview on "Fox News Sunday."

"What the president did doesn't even accomplish what he sets out to do in the categories that he did," she said. "But we said to them, we'll come down a trillion, you go up a trillion. Meet us halfway, and we'll be able to have an agreement that meets the needs of the American people."

She added that the Republicans' proposal in its current form doesn't come close to doing enough to help Americans.

"How do you justify tens of billions of dollars to feed the hungry to $250,000," she said. "You understand how far apart we are. just by that example."

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS?

Navarro defended the president's use of the executive orders, arguing that Trump is "working on behalf of the American people" while Congress remains gridlocked.

"What we've got here is the failure of talks and the president taking action on forefronts to help for discrete groups," Navarro said.

He also blasted Pelosi, who he said should not be bringing private negotiations into the public forum.

"You don't do them here on TV. You don't do them on Capitol Hill in the rotunda like Nancy Pelosi does," Navarro said. "You do it with sincerity. You have to have both sides willing to make a deal. I know a deal can be done if you just go by that rule."

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Navarro acknowledged that if Congress can solve the problem, there's no need for the president to take executive action, but argued that Democrats need to show they are willing to come to the table if real progress is to be made. Otherwise, the administration will continue to step in.

"We've got four actions President Trump has taken that will help workers, the unemployed, renters, homeowners and students, student who have student loans," Navarro said. "What we need is a sincere negotiation. We have to believe that both sides actually want a deal."

Fox News' Tyler Olson contributed to this report.

Original Article

Sen. Ron Johnson denies getting dirt on Biden from Ukrainian lawmaker, blasts Blumenthal for ‘twisting’ classified briefings

closeSen. Johnson on the biggest question of the Russia probe: 'Who knew what and when?'Video

Sen. Johnson on the biggest question of the Russia probe: 'Who knew what and when?'

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson gives an update on efforts to uncover the truth on the origins of the Russia investigation.

Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., is hitting back against a scathing op-ed in the Washington Post by Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., arguing that he never received documents relating to Joe Biden’s family nor did the CIA refuse to brief him on the matter.

In a lengthy thread on Twitter, Johnson denied Blumenthal’s claims that he received documents relating to Joe Biden and his son's activities in Ukraine from the son of a former Soviet intelligence agent and blasted the Connecticut Democrat for his “twisting of classified briefings and repeating of false news reports.”

“[Blumenthal’s] twisting of classified briefings and repeating of false news reports is beyond the pale,” Johnson tweeted. “It is a flat-out lie that I received the documents from Ukrainians that Democrats keep claiming. And they know it. It is unconscionable that Democrats and the press continue to report it.”

Johnson’s Twitter screed continued: “It is a flat-out lie that I asked for the CIA to brief our committee and that they refused. We’ve already been briefed repeatedly on these issues, Democrats simply didn’t like what they heard.”

In his op-ed on Friday, Blumenthal suggested that Johnson, the chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, may be using Russian disinformation to move ahead with his investigation into Biden’s family. Blumenthal cites a report from last week that says Johnson had been provided with tapes by Andrii Derkach, a Ukrainian lawmaker whose father was a KGB agent.

Derkach has been active in leveling unsubstantiated corruption allegations against Biden and his son Hunter, who used to sit on the board of Burisma, a Ukrainian natural gas company. That effort has included publicizing leaked phone calls.

“Johnson’s actions are of such concern to the CIA, according to news reports, that the agency has refused to brief him,” Blumenthal wrote. “Think of it: Congress may become a forum for debunked conspiracy theories peddled by Kremlin proxies.”

MARIE YOVANOVITCH, FORMER UKRAINE AMBASSADOR RECALLED BY TRUMP, IS RETIRING FROM STATE DEPARTMENT

He added: “There is no excuse for perpetuating Russian disinformation in the U.S. Senate, just as there is no excuse for barring the American public from learning more about the genuine foreign threats to the November election. The Trump administration appears to be failing to take the danger seriously, failing to prepare adequately.”

The senatorial spat comes just days after the U.S. counterintelligence chief said that officials believe that Russia is using a variety of measures to denigrate Biden ahead of the November election and that individuals linked to the Kremlin are boosting Trump’s reelection bid.

The statement Friday from William Evanina is believed to be the most pointed declaration by the U.S. intelligence community linking the Kremlin to efforts to get Trump reelected — a sensitive subject for a president who has rejected intelligence agency assessments that Russia tried to help him in 2016. It also connects Moscow’s disapproval of Biden to his role as vice president in shaping Obama administration policies supporting Ukraine, an important U.S. ally, and opposing Russian leader Vladimir Putin.

Asked about the intelligence assessment Friday evening in Bedminster, New Jersey, Trump appeared to dispute the idea that Russia was disparaging Biden. “I think the last person Russia wants to see in office is Donald Trump because nobody has been tougher on Russia than I have — ever,” he said.

Concerns about election interference are especially acute following a wide-ranging effort by Russia to meddle in the 2016 election on Trump’s behalf through both the hacking of Democratic emails and a covert social media campaign aimed at sowing discord among U.S. voters. Trump has routinely resisted the idea that the Kremlin favored him in 2016, but the intelligence assessment released Friday indicates that unnamed Kremlin-linked actors are again working to boost his candidacy on social media and Russian television.

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The White House reacted to Friday’s news with a statement saying “the United States will not tolerate foreign interference in our electoral processes and will respond to malicious foreign threats that target our democratic institutions.”

Tony Blinken, a senior adviser to Biden’s campaign, responded that Trump “has publicly and repeatedly invited, emboldened, and even tried to coerce foreign interference in American elections. … Joe Biden, on the other hand, has led the fight against foreign interference for years.”

Democrats in Congress who have participated in recent classified briefings on election interference have expressed alarm at what they have heard. They have urged the U.S. intelligence community to make public some of their concerns in part to avoid a repeat of 2016, when Obama administration officials were seen as slow and overly deliberate in their public discussion of active Russian measures in that year’s election.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Lockdowns spark discussions for long-term alcohol reform

A bartender pours a beer while wearing a mask and face shield amid the coronavirus pandemic at Slater’s 50/50 Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in Santa Clarita, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:17 PM PT – Sunday, August 9, 2020

Bar closures and other lockdown measures meant to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 have sparked potentially permanent alcohol reforms in U.S.

The consumption of alcohol in bars is often associated with tightly packed crowds and drink sharing, which are both suspected to be major catalysts for spreading the virus. Local authorities have cracked down on this kind of activity in hopes of bringing an end to the pandemic.

However, this move has also prompted a series of reforms on how Americans can consume alcohol.

Bars, which were hardest hit by COVID closures, have been ordered to close or limit capacity.

A patron watches TV in a bar prior to NHL hockey exhibition game action betweent the Columbus Blue Jackets and the Boston Bruins in Toronto, Thursday, July 30, 2020. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP)

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has opted to shut down alcohol sales for dine in after 10 pm.

“We believe stopping the sales at 10 o’clock is going to help,” he said. “It will help thin that crowd out and slow the spread.”

Meanwhile, some reforms have eased restrictions on alternative forms of business to keep them afloat. For example, more than 30 states have voted to allow to-go and delivery sales of alcoholic beverages.

Although originally intended as a temporary fix, many of these reforms could endure well after the coronavirus has subsided. Lawmakers in multiple states, including Michigan and New York, have voted to maintain these changes for years after the pandemic ends to help booze based businesses recover.

Iowa has even opted to make to-go cocktails permanent, while other states like Ohio are considering doing the same.

People crowded around bars in Sturgis, S.D., on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020 during the 80th anniversary of the Sturgis Motorcyle Rally. (AP Photo/Stephen Groves)

Bar staff make up a significant portion of workers who lost their jobs as a result of the pandemic. Many people argued making these reforms last will be key to helping these businesses hire back employees and recover from the economic impact of COVID-19.

MORE NEWS: Economist Moore: America Cannot Have Anymore Lockdowns

Original Article

White House economic adviser optimistic on economic resurgence

Stephen Moore is interviewed in his Washington office in 2016. (Tom Williams / CQ Roll Call via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:15 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

A member of the White House economic task force has expressed his optimism over the economy’s recovery. On Sunday, economist Stephen Moore voiced a positive outlook on seeing a V-shaped climb in the economy.

The adviser has suggested the economy may begin to rise as long as President Trump continues to help job resurgences.

Though the economy took a major hit during the pandemic, Moore believes the July jobs report indicated clear hope for an economic comeback.

“We saw 1.8 million jobs created in one month. That’s the third highest monthly job increase in American history. We saw increases in construction, we saw increases in restaurant jobs, we saw increases in the factories and manufacturing. So, it was a very positive report. We regained 9.2 million jobs in three months. We regained 4,045% of the jobs that were lost.” – Stephen Moore, White House economic adviser

Though the report is optimistic, the adviser added it may still take up to a year for the economy to fully recover.

RELATED: Wall To Wall: Stephen Moore On July Jobs Report

Original Article

Hospital fire in India kills 11 coronavirus patients

Rescuers in protective suits carry the body of a victim from Hotel Swarna Palace where a fire broke out early morning in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh state, India, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. (AP Photo)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:45 AM PT – Sunday, August 9, 2020

A deadly hotel fire killed at least 11 people and left around 22 others injured in India this weekend. The blaze erupted earlier on Sunday at a hotel, which was being used as a temporary COVID-19 facility.

According to reports, it was caused by a faulty electrical circuit on the building’s first floor. The circuit shorted and ignited the fire, which quickly engulfed the hotel.

17 of the alleged 30 patients being treated at the facility were able to escape with the help of the local police and fire departments.

“15 to 20 COVID patients and government hospital staff were rescued. They were shifted to other private hospitals immediately. There are about, right now, a minimum of six to seven dead bodies inside. Some of them are critical in other hospitals. Now we have to count how many deceased are there, it will be known in a short while.” – B. Srinivasulu, Police Commissioner, Vijaywada District

Rescuers and others stand outside Hotel Swarna Palace where a fire broke out early morning in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh state, India, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. (AP Photo)

A similar incident occurred last week in a private hospital in western India, claiming the lives of eight coronavirus patients.

MORE NEWS: Locals Try To Stop The Spread Of Leaking Oil Off East African Coast

Original Article

White House economic adviser optimistic on economic resurgence

Stephen Moore is interviewed in his Washington office in 2016. (Tom Williams / CQ Roll Call via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:15 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

A member of the White House economic task force has expressed his optimism over the economy’s recovery. On Sunday, economist Stephen Moore voiced a positive outlook on seeing a V-shaped climb in the economy.

The adviser has suggested the economy may begin to rise as long as President Trump continues to help job resurgences.

Though the economy took a major hit during the pandemic, Moore believes the July jobs report indicated clear hope for an economic comeback.

“We saw 1.8 million jobs created in one month. That’s the third highest monthly job increase in American history. We saw increases in construction, we saw increases in restaurant jobs, we saw increases in the factories and manufacturing. So, it was a very positive report. We regained 9.2 million jobs in three months. We regained 4,045% of the jobs that were lost.” – Stephen Moore, White House economic adviser

Though the report is optimistic, the adviser added it may still take up to a year for the economy to fully recover.

RELATED: Wall To Wall: Stephen Moore On July Jobs Report

Original Article

Locals try to stop the spread of leaking oil off East African coast

This photo taken and provided by Eric Villars shows oil leaking from the MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship that recently ran aground off the southeast coast of Mauritius, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. (Eric Villars via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:33 AM PT – Sunday, August 9, 2020

According to officials on the East African island nation of Mauritius, the oil spill on their coast is still a “very sensitive situation.”

Containment efforts continued in the area on Sunday. Locals erected makeshift barriers, made of fabric sacks filled with sugar cane leaves, along the walls of the leaking ship.

The incident occurred back in July after a Japanese ship, which was carrying nearly 4,000 tons of fuel, ran itself aground on a coral reef. Since then, oil has been leaking into the Indian Ocean and beyond.

“For the local people, it’s been terrible. They are fishermen, they are boat operators, they are divers. They live from the sea and they eat from the sea. So, tourism will be affected for a long period of time, and they won’t be able to do any of that. The government has had to close a school because of the smell. It’s terrible, it’s detrimental to the health of the people there.” – Reuben Pillay, resident

This photo provided by the French Defense Ministry shows a French military transport aircraft carrying pollution control equipment after landing in Mauritius island, Sunday Aug.9, 2020. (Gwendoline Defente/EMAE via AP)

The small island nation has since declared an environmental emergency. French President Emmanuel Macron has vowed to send help.

MORE NEWS: The World Comes To The Aid Of Beirut

Original Article

Washington, D.C. shooting kills 1, injures at least 20

Screengrab via WUSA9 report.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:55 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

More than 20 people were injured and at least one was killed in a shooting in Southeast Washington, D.C. On Sunday morning, several suspects opened fire on a crowd that was gathered for a block party in the nation’s capital.

17-year-old Christopher Brown was killed and one off-duty female police officer was critically injured.

Hundreds had massed for an event before the shooting took place. Families were walking around the crowded neighborhood before shots rang out around them.

“So in total, we have 20 victims. Two of the victims are 17 years of age, the rest of the victims are adults. Other than the 17-year-old who lost his life and the police officer who’s struggling for her life, the rest of the gunshot wounds, as far as we know, are non-life threatening.” – Chief Peter Newsham, Washington, D.C. Police Department

The Washington, D.C. Police Department has yet to make an arrest. The incident remains under investigation.

Screengrab via NBC Washington report.

MORE NEWS: Thousands Gather In S.D. For Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

Original Article

Ga. police arrest suspected gunman in fatal shooting

Photo via Gwinnett County Police Department.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:20 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

A manhunt in Georgia came to an end after police apprehended a suspect gunman, who has been accused of fatally shooting one person and injuring another. On Saturday, authorities identified the assailant as 18-year-old Joshua Brandt.

Photo via Gwinnett County Police Department.

The incident happened on Friday in Suwanee, which is just 30 miles outside of Atlanta. Brandt allegedly opened fire inside a manufacturing business building.

Authorities initially believed it to be an active shooter situation. However, they have since said, based on the shooter’s movements, that the victim was specifically targeted.

“We were just sitting around and then, in the warehouse area, we just heard gunshots. A few gunshots, then a break, then more gunshots. Then our managers told us to run to the break room for safety and we ran outside.” – Bryant Armstrong, employee

The victim has been identified as 38-year-old James Ross. The others injured in the incident suffered non-life threatening injuries.

MORE NEWS: High Speed Police Chase Leaves 2 Bystanders Dead, 2 Injured

Original Article

Kai Kahele wins Democrat nomination to replace Rep. Gabbard in Hawaii

FILE – State Sen. Kai Kahele, center, waves at the Hawaii State Capitol in Honolulu Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (Craig Kojima/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:35 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

Former Democrat presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s replacement won a landslide victory in Hawaii’s latest Democrat primary election. State Sen. Kai Kahele reportedly won roughly 75% of the vote to represent the state’s second district on Saturday.

Gabbard, the incumbent, did not seek reelection, which paved an easier path for Kahele to fill her seat.

“I definitely thought that when congressman Gabbard decided to not seek reelection that somebody would have jumped into this race on the Democratic side,” said Kahele. “I was surprised that did not happen.”

The state senator initially announced his decision to run after several Hawaiians voiced frustration over Gabbard’s presidential ambitions. He has been on active duty with the National Guard for the past four months, but is excited to get back on the campaign trail.

Kahele will face off with Republican Joe Akana in November’s general election.

MORE NEWS: Hagerty Wins GOP Senate Nomination In Tenn.

Original Article

Pew poll: 79% of Americans believe houses of worship should practice social distancing

Catholic priest Fr. Ian Espartero walks past empty pews as he prepares to distribute communion to a few parishioners as a measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19 at the Our Lady of Consolation Parish on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Quezon city, Philippines. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:50 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

According to new poll, the vast majority of Americans believe houses of worship should follow the same pandemic guidelines as other businesses and organizations. The poll, which was released by Pew on Friday, revealed nearly eight in 10 Americans agree with this line of thinking.

Nearly 3/4 of Christians surveyed said churches synagogues, mosques and others should be required to practice social distancing.

The poll also found both sides of the aisle seemed to come together on this issue. 63% of Republicans and an overwhelming 93% of Democrats agreed the guidelines are important.

“It’s vital that to control the spread of the virus, anytime people get together, including for religious services, everyone wear masks, practice social distancing, wash their hands, and while indoors make sure there’s good ventilation and airflow,” explained Governor Mike DeWine (R-Ohio).

The results came from the responses of more than 10,000 adults and has a 1.5% margin of error.

MORE NEWS: Los Angeles To Shut Off Power, Water To Homes Caught Violating Social Distancing Orders

Original Article

Washington, D.C. shooting kills 1, injures at least 20

Screengrab via WUSA9 report.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:55 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

More than 20 people were injured and at least one was killed in a shooting in Southeast Washington, D.C. On Sunday morning, several suspects opened fire on a crowd that was gathered for a block party in the nation’s capital.

17-year-old Christopher Brown was killed and one off-duty female police officer was critically injured.

Hundreds had massed for an event before the shooting took place. Families were walking around the crowded neighborhood before shots rang out around them.

“So in total, we have 20 victims. Two of the victims are 17 years of age, the rest of the victims are adults. Other than the 17-year-old who lost his life and the police officer who’s struggling for her life, the rest of the gunshot wounds, as far as we know, are non-life threatening.” – Chief Peter Newsham, Washington, D.C. Police Department

The Washington, D.C. Police Department has yet to make an arrest. The incident remains under investigation.

Screengrab via NBC Washington report.

MORE NEWS: Thousands Gather In S.D. For Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

Original Article

High speed police chase leaves 2 bystanders dead, 2 injured

Photo via Cincinnati Police Department.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:10 AM PT — Sunday, August 9, 2020

Two bystanders are dead following a high speed police chase from Cincinnati, Ohio to Newport, Kentucky. Cincinnati police were attempting to conduct a traffic stop on Friday when the vehicle sped away.

The three suspects were reportedly the subjects of an ongoing felony investigation by the Organized Crime Investigations Squad and the ATF Task Force.

The chase came to an end when the suspects crashed into four bystanders, killing two and injuring two.

“Pursuits are always a concern. Unfortunately, because of the nature of the crimes individuals could commit, we cannot allow them just to roam free. However, we have to be mindful of public safety.” – Chief Elliot Isaac, Cincinnati Police Department

The suspects sustained minor injuries in the crash and have been arrested. The Newport Police Department is conducting an investigation into the crash.

MORE NEWS: Washington, D.C. Shooting Kills 1, Injures At Least 20

Original Article

Coronavirus bill a monster lift that worries lawmakers on two fronts: ballot box and economy

closeFox News Flash top headlines for August 9Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for August 9

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on FoxNews.com.

“Bit by bit. Putting it together.

Piece by piece. Only way to make a work of art.

Every moment makes a contribution.

Every detail plays a part.

Having just a vision’s no solution.

Everything depends on execution.” – “Putting it Together” from “Sunday In the Park With George” by Stephen Sondheim

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’Video

PELOSI SLAMS TRUMP'S EXECUTIVE ACTIONS AS AN 'ILLUSION' IN 'FOX NEWS SUNDAY' INTERVIEW

It probably won’t be a “work of art” if and when….if and when…negotiators ever finalize a coronavirus bill. Those talks seem permanently stalled now after Friday’s meeting on Capitol Hill and President Trump taking executive action in lieu of a legislative agreement on Saturday.

But the words from Sondheim on Broadway echo even in the marble halls of Congress.

Any coronavirus bill this big, this complex, covering almost unprecedented scope, is a monster lift. “Every detail plays a part,” as they say in the song. “Bit by bit.” That’s why an old saw prevails on Capitol Hill when the sides struggle with a complicated bill. “Nothing is decided until everything’s decided.”

And, it all depends on execution.

“There’s still a huge number of differences. I’m not real optimistic that we’re going to get a deal done in the short term,” lamented Sen. Mike Rounds, R-S.D.

Sec. Steve Mnuchin: Democrats are holding up benefits to hardworking AmericansVideo

MNUCHIN WARNS DEMOCRATS AGAINST CHALLENGING TRUMP'S EXECUTIVE ORDERS

There is now consternation about no bill to combat the pandemic.

“I feel discouragement and desperation,” said Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, heading into a Senate GOP Conference meeting last week with no firm deal within reach on the coronavirus bill. “We don’t have answers for people right now that are really worried.”

Lawmakers are concerned on two fronts. First, voters will blame them if they fail to forge an accord. That could resonate at the ballot box. Second, a level of terror is starting to set in about the shape of the U.S. economy heading into the fall and winter. Restaurants and cafes are closing. Schools may have to shutter. And the only alternative lawmakers may have is coughing up gobs of money, just to keep the economy afloat.

“The last six months have just been emotionally exhausting for people. We’ve all heard this before. We’re ready for COVID-19 to be over. But the virus is not ready to be over with us,” said Murkowski.

A bill of this dimension is practically unprecedented. Only rivaled in sheer size by the $3 trillion coronavirus bill House Democrats assembled and passed in May. This is why lawmakers are increasingly jittery about never moving anything on the floor of the House or Senate. Finding the right cocktail of votes remains elusive with such a behemoth measure.

The price tag alone gives many Republicans heartburn.

It is often said that Congress is a “reactive” institution. Something big happens – and then Congress acts.

Trump signs coronavirus relief executive ordersVideo

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR COROANVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ACTIONS?

But that is a misnomer. A gunman shot former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in the head in 2011. Unadulterated evil tore through Sandy Hook in 2012. Parkland in 2018. Firearms are a radioactive subject on Capitol Hill. But many observers expected the freeze on gun legislation would thaw in some form after any of those events.

Nothing happened.

Nothing.

In 2008, the nation teetered on the precipice of the biggest economic calamity since 1929. The administration of President George W. Bush and congressional leaders quickly crafted a surprisingly simple, but expensive and controversial measure to salvage the economy. Known as the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, the legislation created TARP, the Troubled Asset Relief Program. The bill awarded the Treasury Department $700 billion to snap up mangled mortgages, loans, debts and other holdings which were so volatile, they risked collapsing the economy.

In the most dramatic floor vote in decades, the House of Representatives defeated the initial version of TARP. The result stunned everyone. The market plunged out of control.

But a few days later, the Senate took charge, passing the measure and sending it back over to the House, which synced up.

And so here we are with discussions on the next coronavirus measure.

“There is a fear that people don’t really understand how bad this is,” said one senior House source who asked to not be identified. “Poverty. Starvation. We have to act.”

TRUMP PAYROLL TAX EXECUTIVE ORDER LIKELY WORTH $1,200 PER WORKER: KUDLOW

But it is so hard to cobble together a bill of this size and sell it to rank-and-file lawmakers. That’s the lesson from TARP.

“I feel optimistic there’s light at the end of the tunnel. But how long that tunnel is, is yet to be seen,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., last week.

Pelosi hosted almost daily meetings in her office with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. Those conclaves produced millimeters of progress. With so little movement, Fox began hearing from trade groups and industry representatives. They fretted the sides may never forge a bill. There’s worry about businesses collapsing or significant layoffs if another package isn’t in the works. They worried about the lack of urgency on Capitol Hill.

“There is a fight-or-flight concern from the business industry,” said one government relations source. “It’s scary.”

“Having just a vision’s no solution,” wrote Stephen Sondheim.

If there is ever a pact, it will take days to merge ideas into legislative text.

If there ever was legislative language, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Pelosi, Schumer and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., would have to massage the plan with their conferences and caucuses. Concocting the right vote matrix to pass both chambers would loom as the most daunting task in this process. A mixture of Democrats and Republicans were supposed to vote TARP in the House in 2008 – but initially fell short.

Few Republicans will back anything unless there is a direct blessing by President Trump. McConnell reiterated to colleague Mike Emanuel last week that there are “15 or 20 of my members who believe that we’ve already added quite enough to the national debt.” It’s unclear if even Mr. Trump could pry any of those members loose.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., steps away from the microphone as he speak to reporters following the weekly Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 9, 2020. McConnell has struggled to come to a compromise with congressional Democrats on another coronavirus relief bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., steps away from the microphone as he speak to reporters following the weekly Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 9, 2020. McConnell has struggled to come to a compromise with congressional Democrats on another coronavirus relief bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

MCCONNELL CLAIMS DEMS DON'T HAVE 'SENSE OF URGENCY .. THAT I'D LIKE TO SEE' TO GET CORONAVIRUS BILL DONE

Don’t forget how the President blew up an interim accord to avoid a government shutdown in December 2018. President Trump braised McConnell in that episode. McConnell thought he had the green light that the president would sign an interim measure to avert a shutdown. The Senate approved a stopgap plan and left town. Hours later, Mr. Trump balked. That triggered a 35-day government shutdown.

Certainly Democrats will have to compromise to get a deal. But Republicans and the president must compromise, too. And President Trump must send a clear, clarion signal that he would sign a final agreement into law.

Pelosi indicated she was prepared to drop her requirement of a $3 trillion-plus bill to something in the $2 trillion range. But administration negotiators say that was still too high. Schumer indicated that Democrats couldn’t go that low.

Democrats are key to the entire package since there is GOP resistance. Some Republicans will reject anything. But the Democrats may only be able to go to $2 trillion before there is attrition on their side of the aisle.

“The House doesn’t have the votes to go south of $2 trillion,” said Schumer. “The Senate Democrats [don’t have] votes below $2 trillion. That’s what compromise is all about.”

The sides are locked in. But, it should have been expected that Meadows and Mnuchin would have to be at loggerheads with Pelosi and Schumer for at least a while. This could demonstrate to President Trump that they’re not being rolled. Moreover, Pelosi and Schumer — but especially Pelosi – would have to show liberals they’re not willing to bend. The stalemate also gives the president the chance to implement an executive order and memoranda, bypassing Congress. That’s not to say this is staged parliamentary performance art. But the sides must definitely go through machinations if there ever is to be an agreement.

The president isn’t in the room – primarily because of epic blow-ups between him and Pelosi last year at the White House. It’s unclear if Mr. Trump has the bona fides to craft such a deal of this magnitude with Congress — despite his 1987 business book “The Art of the Deal.”

The person doing most of President Trump’s bidding is Meadows. Meadows helped create the Freedom Caucus when he represented North Carolina in Congress. His calling card was blowing things up. Meadows upended various proposals during his time on Capitol Hill. His July 2015 effort to prompt a new vote for Speaker in the middle of the Congress nudged then House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, to retire later that year. It’s unknown if Meadows can pivot 180 degrees and fashion an agreement considering his track record. And, even if he can, can Meadows simultaneously get the president to sign off?

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As Sondheim may say, “bit by bit. Putting it together.”

But it’s a glacial pace. And that’s a problem. No bill is coming any time soon.

“This is not a fine wine,” said Meadows. “It doesn’t improve with time.”

Original Article

McCarthy blames Pelosi’s ‘personal wish list’ for coronavirus stimulus bill failure

closeRep. McCarthy: Trump showed that he puts people in front of politicsVideo

Rep. McCarthy: Trump showed that he puts people in front of politics

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy joins ‘Sunday Morning Futures.’

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., on Sunday heaped the blame on Congress’ failure to pass another coronavirus stimulus bill on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's “personal wish list” and defended President Trump’s use of executive orders to defer payroll taxes and replace an expired unemployment benefit with a lower amount.

“Remember, every time we've done legislation when it comes to COVID, Nancy Pelosi has always held it up for her own personal wish list,” McCarthy said during an interview on “Sunday Morning Futures.” Remember when we did the Cares Act, she held it up for more than a week when thousands of people were being unemployed because she wanted more money for the arts and the Kennedy Center… now when we are sitting here coming forward with people unemployed again, she held it up.”

McCarthy’s comments come a day after Trump signed his executive orders following the collapse of negotiations with Congress on a new coronavirus rescue package.

Trump's orders on Saturday encroached on Congress' control of federal spending and seemed likely to be met with legal challenges. The president cast his actions as necessary given that lawmakers have been unable to reach an agreement to plunge more money into the stumbling economy, which has imperiled his November reelection.

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS?

Trump moved to continue paying a supplemental federal unemployment benefit for millions of Americans out of work during the outbreak. However, his order called for up to $400 payments each week, one-third less than the $600 people had been receiving. How many people would receive the benefit and how long it might take to arrive were open questions.

The previous unemployment benefit, which expired on Aug. 1, was fully funded by Washington, but Trump is asking states to now cover 25 percent. He is seeking to set aside $44 billion in previously approved disaster aid to help states, but said it would be up to states to determine how much, if any of it, to fund, so the benefits could be smaller still.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’Video

“What President Trump did, he really showed he was the one person in the room that put people before politics,” McCarthy said. “[Trump] said, ‘You know what? I'm going to continue to help the people on unemployment. If you're going to continue to play these games, I'm going to take action and put America first instead of your own personal ambitions.’”

Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. dismissed Trump's actions as “meager” in the face of economic and health crises facing Americans. Democrats initially sought a $3.4 trillion package, but said they lowered their ask in talks to $2 trillion. Republicans had proposed a $1 trillion plan.

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"Today’s meager announcements by the president show President Trump still does not comprehend the seriousness or the urgency of the health and economic crises facing working families," Pelosi said in a joint statement with Schumer on Saturday. "We’re disappointed that instead of putting in the work to solve Americans’ problems, the President instead chose to stay on his luxury golf course to announce unworkable, weak and narrow policy announcements to slash the unemployment benefits that millions desperately need and endanger seniors’ Social Security and Medicare."

Trump signs coronavirus relief executive orders, blames Democrats for prolonged stalemateVideo

Trump's Democratic opponent in the presidential race, Joe Biden, called the orders "a series of half-baked measures" and accused him of putting at risk Social Security, which is funded by the payroll tax.

The use of executive actions also drew criticism from Republican Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska.
"The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop," said Sasse, a member of the Senate's Judiciary and Finance panels. He added that Trump "does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law. Under the Constitution, that power belongs to the American people acting through their members of Congress."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

US tech companies interested in ‘Trojan horse’ TikTok must prove no ties to China: Sen. Cotton

closeSen. Cotton: TikTok is like a Trojan horse on American phonesVideo

Sen. Cotton: TikTok is like a Trojan horse on American phones

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton weighs in on U.S. National Security concerns involving TikTok with ‘Sunday Morning Futures.’

Any U.S. company interested in acquiring part or all of popular app TikTok's business should be required to prove they do not have lingering ties to China, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., said on Sunday.

"[TikTok] has to have an American parent and be wholly owned and operated – not just the servers and the data, but all of the source code, the algorithms, the engineers," Cotton told "Sunday Morning Futures." "There can be no lingering ties to China."

"And I think we have to be reasonably skeptical about any American companies to do that," he said. "They have to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the U.S. government that they can sever all those ties."

SENATE UNANIMOUSLY PASSES BILL BANNING TIKTOK FROM GOVERNMENT DEVICES

Cotton's statement comes as Microsoft appears to be the frontrunner among U.S. companies interested in acquiring TikTok's U.S. business after President Trump set a 45-day time limit for TikTok to find an American buyer.

TikTok is controlled by parent company ByteDance, which is based in China.

In this Feb. 25, 2020 photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. (AP Photo)

In this Feb. 25, 2020 photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. (AP Photo)

"TikTok is like a Trojan horse on American cellphones, and that's why I commend the president for taking the action to ban TikTok in America if it's not wholly-owned and operated by an American parent company," Cotton said. "I encouraged the administration about a year ago to conduct the security review that ultimately led to this decision."

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The Senate unanimously passed a bill spearheaded by Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., Thursday to banTikTok from all government devices.

Original Article

Mnuchin warns Democrats against challenging Trump’s executive orders

closeSec. Steve Mnuchin: Democrats are holding up benefits to hardworking AmericansVideo

Sec. Steve Mnuchin: Democrats are holding up benefits to hardworking Americans

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin warned Democrats on Sunday that any legal challenge to President Trump’s recent executive orders would delay financial assistance to millions of Americans as he defended the move to drop federal unemployment benefits from $600 a week to $400.

“We’ve cleared with the office of legal counsel all these actions,” Mnuchin said on “Fox News Sunday.” “If the Democrats want to challenge us in court and hold up unemployment benefits to those hardworking Americans that are out of a job because of COVID, they’re going to have a lot of explaining to do.”

Trump on Saturday signed executive orders to defer payroll taxes and replace an expired unemployment benefit with a lower amount after negotiations with Congress on a new coronavirus rescue package collapsed.

The president’s order calls for up to $400 payments each week, one-third less than the $600 people had been receiving. How many people would receive the benefit and how long it might take to arrive were open questions.

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS?

The previous unemployment benefit, which expired on Aug. 1, was fully funded by Washington, but Trump is asking states to now cover 25 percent. He is seeking to set aside $44 billion in previously approved disaster aid to help states, but said it would be up to states to determine how much, if any of it, to fund, so the benefits could be smaller still.

When questioned why the administration lowered the federal unemployment benefits, Mnuchin said it was “a fair compromise” and that the White House had offered to continue paying the $600 a week while they negotiated with Democrats. “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace countered by saying the administration had offered to extend the $600 benefits by one week.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slams Trump’s executive order as an ‘illusion’Video

“Actually we extended it to two weeks,” Mnuchin said.

Mnuchin also argued that Trump’s proposed payroll tax suspension would not lead to reductions in Social Security payments – an issue raised by presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and other Democrats.

“The president in no way wants to harm those trust funds, so they’d be reimbursed just as they always have in the past when we’ve done these types of things,” Mnuchin said.

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Trump’s executive orders, which he signed Saturday from his country club in New Jersey, have been met with sharp resistance from Democrats, and even some Republicans, as unconstitutional and ultimately unhelpful to Americans struggling financially during the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump signs coronavirus relief executive orders, blames Democrats for prolonged stalemateVideo

The use of executive actions drew criticism from Republican Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska. “The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop," said Sasse, a member of the Senate's Judiciary and Finance panels. He added that Trump "does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law. Under the Constitution, that power belongs to the American people acting through their members of Congress.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Graham says FBI deceived Senate Intelligence Committee in 2018 briefing on Steele dossier: ‘misled the hell out of them’

closeSen. Graham: Sub-source said most of Steele report was hearsayVideo

Sen. Graham: Sub-source said most of Steele report was hearsay

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham joins 'Sunday Morning Futures.'

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsay Graham said on "Sunday Morning Futures" that the FBI deceived his counterparts in the Senate Intelligence Committee during a 2018 interview on the investigation into Russian election interference, citing a newly released he obtained through the Department of Justice.

According to Graham, R-S.C., the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2018 called in the FBI to testify on the reliability of the notorious Steele Dossier. The dossier was pivotal to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrants the bureau obtained for former Trump aide Carter Page as part of its "Crossfire Hurricane" investigation into Russian election interference.

The senator said that the FBI then told the committee there was no reason to doubt the dossier and primary subsource that ex-British spy Carter Page used in putting together the dossier, despite the fact the source had previously said that the dossier mischaracterizes the information he gave Steele.

"It was Horowitz, during his investigation of the warrant application, found information in 2018 where the FBI was called on the Senate Intel Committee because people were getting suspicious about the subsource … at the Senate Intel Committee level and the FBI was sent over to brief them," Graham said. "And they did to the Senate Intel Committee what they did to the FISA court. They misled the hell out of them. They said there's no evidence from the subsource to suggest that Steele fabricated anything in the dossier."

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks at a news conference. Graham has been fiercely critical of the FBI's "Crossfire Hurricane" investigation. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks at a news conference. Graham has been fiercely critical of the FBI's "Crossfire Hurricane" investigation. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

In one line, in the document released Sunday, the FBI said that "[a]t minimum, our discussions with [the primary subsource] confirm that the dossier was not fabricated by Steele."

DECLASSIFIED SENATE INTELLIGENCE REPORT SHOWS STRONG DOUBTS ABOUT STEELE DOSSIER IN DECEMBER 2016

Graham added: "Actually, the subsource said it was all bar talk, hearsay, speculation and conjecture, and the whole sexual activity of the president was made in jest. So they completely misrepresented to the Senate Intel Committee in 2018 what the subsource had told the FBI in 2017."

Documents recently released by the Senate Intelligence Committee indicate that as early as December 2016 there were strong doubts about the reliability of the Steele Dossier. As the FBI and CIA worked together to create an Intelligence Community Assessment (ICA) to then-present to President Obama, those in the CIA camp, according to the now-declassified interviews conducted by the Senate Intelligence Committee, worried that the FBI was playing up the Steele Dossier too much.

A statement from Former CIA Director John Brennan in the Senate report said that "[i]nitially the FBI wanted it incorporated into the assessment itself." Brennan continued that the CIA did not want to incorporate the intelligence but that "Jim Comey made a very strong case, which we didn't object to, that it needed to accompany the assessment because it was related to the issue, and we didn't know where the FBI's investigation was as far as some of those things."

But Graham Sunday railed against the FBI for allegedly misrepresenting what the Steele subsource told it in 2017 to the intelligence committee a year later. He said people should be prosecuted over it.

REP. RESCHENTHALER SAYS SENATE MUST HEAR FROM JAMES COMEY AFTER YATES TESTIMONY

"Somebody needs to go to jail for this," Graham said. "This is a second lie. This is a second crime. They lied to the FISA court. They got rebuked, the FBI did, in 2019 by the FISA court, putting in doubt all FISA applications … a year before, they're lying to the Senate Intel Committee. It's just amazing the compounding of the lies."

Graham said that he was not sure who specifically briefed the Senate Intelligence Committee on the subsource, but swore he would write to current FBI Director Christopher Wray to get to the bottom of the situation.

"I'm gonna find out who did that briefing, and whoever it is, they're in trouble," Graham said.

Former British spy Christopher Steele's unverified dossier was a major element in warrant applications the FBI filled out to spy on Trump associate Carter Page. Sen. Lindsay Graham slammed the Steele dossier and the FBI's faith in it under former FBI Director James Comey.

Former British spy Christopher Steele's unverified dossier was a major element in warrant applications the FBI filled out to spy on Trump associate Carter Page. Sen. Lindsay Graham slammed the Steele dossier and the FBI's faith in it under former FBI Director James Comey.

"Sunday Morning Futures" host Maria Bartiromo also asked Graham his thoughts on the Senate's hearing this week with former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates. Graham said his impression was that former FBI Director James Comey has a growing list of problems, which Graham intends to ask him about.

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"Everybody's throwing Comey under the bus," Graham said. "When I asked Sally Yates about the interview with Michael Flynn, orchestrated by Comey — Was that okay? Was the proper? — she said no, it was rogue."

He added: "So you've got Rosenstein, now Sally Yates, saying if they knew then what they know now they wouldn't sign the warrant application, which means they're running away from Crossfire Hurricane, they're dumping it all on Comey, and that's probably the right thing to do."

Original Article