14 Hawaiian Airlines flight attendants test positive for COVID-19

File – A Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330-200 takes off at San Francisco International Airport, San Francisco, California. (REUTERS Photo/Louis Nastro)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:43 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

A cluster of COVID-19 cases involving over a dozen flight attendants for Hawaiian Airlines has continued to grow. That’s according to the airline Tuesday. It revealed 14 of its employees have tested positive for the coronavirus. Those individuals are now said to be in quarantine.

This new cluster of cases is linked to a recent training session for flight attendants, which was held at airline headquarters in Honolulu. Hawaiian Airlines temporarily cancelled training to deep clean its facilities. The airline already requires travelers wear face masks while boarding and in the air.

“Demand looks pretty good, but remembering now that we have voluntarily capped our loads at 70% so that we can make sure that people are somewhat spread apart,” stated Ann Botticell, spokeswoman for Hawaiian Airlines.

The airline plans to resume a reduced schedule of flights between Hawaii and the mainland starting August 1. On that same day, Hawaii will begin allowing some out-of-state travelers to skip a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

“I kind of have mixed feelings about it honestly,” said Maui resident Lisa Torres. “I mean, I know we need it because we’re so dependent on tourism, but at the same time the cases have been rising and that’s kind of scary.”

In order to avoid the mandatory quarantine, visitors will be required to show proof they don’t have the coronavirus.

RELATED: United Airlines sending ‘gut punch’ furlough warnings to 36K workers

Original Article

Vice President Mike Pence: Reopening schools is essential

Vice President Mike Pence speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing at the Department of Education building Wednesday, July 8, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:45 PM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Vice President Mike Pence has said “it’s time to get our children back to school.” During Wednesday’s coronavirus task force briefing, he stated reopening schools is not only essential for students’ learning, but also their mental and physical health.

He noted the CDC will be releasing new guidelines next week to help schools return to in-person classes this fall. According to the vice president, the federal government will be working with states to make this happen.

“We’re here to help. We don’t want federal guidance to be a substitute for local laws, rules and guidance. We are here to assist with the shared objective that I think is shared by every parent in America, which is we want to get our kids back in the classroom. We want to get out teachers back in the front of those classrooms and get our kids learning in person once again.” – Mike Pence, Vice President of the United States

Pence pointed out there are encouraging signs the national spread of the virus is slowing. He announced curves are flattening in Texas, Arizona and Florida, which have seen a recent resurgence of new cases.

President Donald Trump listens during a “National Dialogue on Safely Reopening America’s Schools,” event in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, July 7, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Trump blasted the CDC’s existing guidelines for the reopening of schools as “impractical,” “tough” and “very expensive.” He criticized the agency’s recommendations on Twitter this week.

Guidelines included developing a plan to separate students into smaller groups, staggering mealtimes in the cafeteria and installing physical barriers.

The president’s criticism came after he held a roundtable on the safe reopening of schools, in which he pledged to put pressure on governors to reopen. He also said he will be meeting with CDC officials to discuss his opposition to their guidelines.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, with Vice President Mike Pence, speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing at the Department of Education building Wednesday, July 8, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Meanwhile, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is considering cutting federal funding for schools who refuse to open in the fall. During a recent interview, Devos stated there is “no excuse for schools to withhold a fulltime education.”

She acknowledged most school funding is given at the state and local level, but noted there are still ways to hold schools financially responsible for refusing to open.

DeVos went on to slam some school districts for “fearmongering” and “politicizing” the push to reopen.

RELATED: States Suing Secy. DeVos, Dept. Of Education

Original Article

House Republicans renew calls for WHO chief to testify, accuse him of endorsing Chinese propaganda efforts

closeWHO says asymptomatic spread of coronavirus is rare, but experts say pre-symptomatic spread is still a big concernVideo

WHO says asymptomatic spread of coronavirus is rare, but experts say pre-symptomatic spread is still a big concern

EXCLUSIVE: House Republicans on Wednesday wrote to the head of the World Health Organization, renewing their calls for him to testify before Congress over its response to the coronavirus crisis, and accused him of endorsing Chinese propaganda efforts.

“Until you appear under oath, America and the world will not know the origins of this crisis,” said the letter from Republicans on the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis to WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION SUBMITS NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL FROM WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

Republicans initially wrote to Tedros on April 9 about the response to the virus, which originated in China and quickly swept through the globe, turning into a global pandemic. But in his response to the committee on June 15, he repeated a claim published on the WHO’s website that the first cases were reported by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission to the WHO.

Letter to World Health Organization by Fox News on Scribd

But the WHO has since updated the timeline to state that officials first learned about the virus from information on a U.S. website by doctors working in Wuhan. That was first reported by The Washington Free Beacon.

“This revelation confirms that China failed to notify the WHO of the outbreak, in violation of the International Health Regulations (IHR) and must be held accountable. By refusing to disclose the truth, you have shielded China from accountability,” the letter says.

“Your public statements regarding the initial outbreak coupled with the WHO website and your June 15 letter to this Committee demonstrate an endorsement of the CCP propaganda efforts to cover up the origins of this virus and mislead the world,” it continued.

WHO admits China did not self-report its coronavirus outbreakVideo

The letter comes a day after the White House formally notified Congress and the U.N. of its intention to leave the organization, effective July 2021. Trump had announced that the U.S. would terminate its relationship with the WHO over its pro-China bias and its handling of the virus.

"Chinese officials ignored their reporting obligations to the World Health Organization and pressured the World Health Organization to mislead the world when the virus was first discovered by Chinese authorities," he said. "Countless lives have been taken and profound economic hardship has been inflicted across the globe."

Trump and others had pointed to concerns about WHO officials' praise of Chinese "transparency," its ignoring of warnings about the virus from Taiwan, and its repetition of Chinese claims that COVID-19 could not be spread from person-to-person. Trump has also pointed to opposition from WHO officials to his decision to place a travel ban on China in the initial days of the crisis.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Republicans have made repeated calls to hold WHO officials accountable, but those calls have so far been ignored by House Democrats who control the various committees.

The letter sent Wednesday calls for all documents and communications related to the pandemic between the WHO and Chinese authorities and between WHO and Taiwan. It requests a response by July 15.

Fox News’ Tyler Olson contributed to this report.

Original Article

Trump meets Mexican president at White House, despite Democratic objections

closeWhite House responds to Dem criticism over Trump visit with Mexican PresidentVideo

White House responds to Dem criticism over Trump visit with Mexican President

President Trump met with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador at the White House on Wednesday in Lopez Obrador’s first foreign trip as president – and despite complaints from Democrats that the meeting was politically motivated.

Trump and Lopez Obrador greeted each other at the West Wing entrance to the White House in a visit that was expected to renew economic ties between the two countries as well as cooperation on combating the coronavirus pandemic.

WHITE HOUSE HITS BACK AT DEM CRITICISM OVER TRUMP VISIT WITH MEXICAN PRESIDENT: 'IT'S REALLY A SHAME'

It is Lopez Obrador’s first visit to the White House and with Trump, as well as his first international trip since taking office in December 2018. The Mexican leader arrived Tuesday in a commercial plane and tested negative for COVID-19.

Earlier, he visited the Lincoln Memorial and a statue of former Mexican President Benito Juarez. Both leaders were expected to tout the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which took effect last week and replaced the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) – an agreement that Trump has repeatedly railed against.

The visit will include a dinner, where business guests from U.S. and Mexican companies will be in attendance. Guests are expected to include CEOs and executives from telecom, auto, financial, transportation, energy and media companies.

But the meeting had raised objections from Democrats. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, comprised entirely of Democrats, accused Trump in a letter last week of staging the meeting as a distraction from what they called a "failure to lead" as many states have faced spikes in coronavirus cases.

"It’s really a shame it's being used for political convenience," a Trump official told Fox News on Tuesday. "Everyone should be proud that these two leaders have the relationship they have to deal with these issues and the challenges that we've faced in these times and have done so fairly successfully.”

Trump has had a sometimes tense relationship with Mexico, particularly due to his aggressive language on illegal immigration during the campaign. Last year, he threatened to slap tariffs on Mexico if it did not do more to stop illegal immigration across the border – which in turn led to greater cooperation between the two on the “Remain in Mexico” policy.

What is the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy?Video

On Wednesday, acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf hailed the cooperation between the two countries on immigration.

“Due to our great partnership with Mexico, we have greatly reduced the flow of illegal migration between our two countries. We look forward to continuing to work with Mexico to prevent criminal activity – to include drug smuggling and gun violence – from making it to U.S. cities,” he said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

With the coronavirus pandemic, the land border between the two countries is currently closed to all but essential traffic, but goods have been able to flow across the border.

Lopez Obrador, meanwhile, has noted that Trump helped Mexico reach a deal with other oil-producing nations to cut production, and also helped the country obtain more ventilators to fight the coronavirus.

The two leaders were scheduled to hold a bilateral meeting, followed by the signing of a joint declaration in the Rose Garden and a press conference.

Fox News’ Rich Edson, Ronn Blitzer and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Sen. Collins refuses to say whether she’ll vote for Trump, signals she won’t campaign against Biden

closeFox News Flash top headlines for July 8Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for July 8

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, refused to say whether she’ll vote for President Trump in November and signaled that she would not campaign against presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

The self-proclaimed moderate Republican from Maine told the New York Times this week she does not campaign against former colleagues. Biden and Collins worked together in the Senate.

“I do not campaign against my colleagues in the Senate,” she said of Biden, adding that she knows him “very well” from their days in Congress together.

“My inclination is just to stay out of the presidential and focus on my own race,” she added.

REPUBLICAN SUSAN COLLINS, KEY SWING-VOTER, ANNOUNCES SHE WILL VOTE TO ACQUIT TRUMP

Collins publicly announced that she would not be voting for Trump ahead of the 2016 election.

Collins, who has represented Maine in the Senate since 1997, may face one of the toughest reelection campaigns of her career as Democrats from outside the state pour in money for her likely Democratic opponent, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon, in an effort to take control of the Senate.

The race has been rated a toss-up by the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.

TRUMP CAMPAIGN AIMS TO EXPAND 2020 ELECTORAL MAP AMID CHALLENGING LANDSCAPE

Collins was considered a swing vote in both the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the impeachment of Trump. She split with Trump more than any other Republican senator in the 116th Congress, but she drew the ire of Democrats when she voted to confirm Kavanaugh and acquit Trump.

Original Article

Wis. to ship more than 2M face masks to K-12 schools

FILE – In this Feb. 6, 2020 file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers holds a news conference in Madison, Wis. (Steve Apps/Wisconsin State Journal via AP, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:58 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Wisconsin officials will be distributing millions of units of personal protective equipment in a bid to stem the state’s resurgence of COVID-19.

On Tuesday, Gov. Tony Evers (D) announced a plan to ship more than 2 million cloth face masks and more than 4,000 infrared thermometers to K-12 schools. Under the plan, another 60,000 masks are also being sent to local food processors and businesses.

This comes as Wisconsin has doubled its number of reported cases in the last month. The state saw 16,500 cases before Memorial Day and 17,000 since.

“No party, no bar is worth it,” stated the Democrat governor. “Among those who have tested positive, there’s been an increase in folks who have met up with people outside of their immediate household in the two weeks prior to the infection.”

Gov. Evers also said he considered a statewide mask order, but thought it unlikely given the state’s Supreme Court recent strike-down of his ‘Safer at Home’ order in May.

RELATED: New ICE rule to encourage schools to reopen

Original Article

Wall Street braces for 2 faces of a President Biden: Progressive champ or middle-of-road moderate?

closeWould a Biden presidency be a ‘danger’ to the stock market?Video

Would a Biden presidency be a ‘danger’ to the stock market?

Wall Street is assessing a potential Joe Biden win. FOX Business’ Hillary Vaughn with more.

Wall Street isn’t sure what to expect if presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden wins November’s general election.

The former vice president has recently embraced the progressive shift within the Democratic Party that has frightened some investors on Wall Street.

“All Wall Street is worried about what if Biden the progressive Biden gets elected…is it going to hurt things?” Biden said during an event with union workers on Wednesday.

With investors openly concerned that a Biden victory could see the White House hijacked by a left-wing, progressive agenda, longtime Biden allies in the finance world are currently working hard to assuage Wall Street’s worries.

BIDEN COMES OUT AGAINST DEFUNDING POLICE

Millionaire venture capitalist Alan Patricof, a Democratic megadonor and longtime friend of Biden, told Fox Business that the former vice president’s promise to raise the corporate tax rate from 21 percent to 28 percent is an effort to rebalance the economy.

“That does not make Joe into a lefty or a progressive,” Patricof said. “It makes him responsible to 350 million-plus people in this country.”

Some on Wall Street are even warming to the idea of a tax hike.

After Biden spoke about his plans at a June fundraiser, Roger Altman – the chairman of investment bank Evercore, said he “would agree with [Biden’s] agenda, including those tax changes.”

Who holds the edge in Joe Biden's VP race?Video

Some firms, however, are forecasting that Biden’s proposed corporate tax hikes could be a blow to some investors and cut S&P 500 earnings by 12 percent.

Goldman Sachs said in its recent analysis that Biden’s plan to hike the corporate tax rate could backtrack growth.

“We estimate that the Biden tax plan would reduce our S&P 500 earnings estimate for 2021 by roughly $20 per share, from $170 to $150,” the multinational investment bank stated.

Some investors also are echoing President Trump’s claim that Biden would surround himself with people that would push him to adopt a far-left agenda.

Biden: June jobs report is positive news, but the COVID-19 crisis is not under controlVideo

“The people around him are radical left,” Trump said in a recent interview with Fox Business. “They are going to raise taxes, raise regulations…It would be a disaster.”

Jonathan Hartley, a former risk manager at Goldman Sachs, told Fox Business that among some investors “there is a concern that the socialist wing of the Democratic Party may very well be in charge” if Biden wins the White House.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Wall Street isn’t just watching Biden – they are also keeping an eye on Senate and House races in the lead-up to November.

If Democrats take control of the Senate and keep the majority in the House, Hartley noted that concerns over a progressive agenda being implemented become much more real for Wall Street.

President Trump touts 'historic' jobs report: 'Shattered expectations,' economy roaring backVideo

“I think especially if you see both a Democratic Senate and a Democratic House coming out in November along with Biden, that things like corporate tax hikes and financial transaction tax would come a lot more of a possibility,” he said.

Patricof said that Biden needs to win the White House by a “significant” margin in November in order to assert control over the Democratic Party.

“I'm hopeful that the victory is significant enough that it will give Joe even more backbone to resist any force on either side,” he said.

He added some advice to the presumptive nominee: “I like to always think of Harry Truman's famous comment, ‘I think Republican and vote Democratic.’”

Original Article

14 Hawaiian Airlines flight attendants test positive for COVID-19

File – A Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330-200 takes off at San Francisco International Airport, San Francisco, California. (REUTERS Photo/Louis Nastro)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:43 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

A cluster of COVID-19 cases involving over a dozen flight attendants for Hawaiian Airlines has continued to grow. That’s according to the airline Tuesday. It revealed 14 of its employees have tested positive for the coronavirus. Those individuals are now said to be in quarantine.

This new cluster of cases is linked to a recent training session for flight attendants, which was held at airline headquarters in Honolulu. Hawaiian Airlines temporarily cancelled training to deep clean its facilities. The airline already requires travelers wear face masks while boarding and in the air.

“Demand looks pretty good, but remembering now that we have voluntarily capped our loads at 70% so that we can make sure that people are somewhat spread apart,” stated Ann Botticell, spokeswoman for Hawaiian Airlines.

The airline plans to resume a reduced schedule of flights between Hawaii and the mainland starting August 1. On that same day, Hawaii will begin allowing some out-of-state travelers to skip a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

“I kind of have mixed feelings about it honestly,” said Maui resident Lisa Torres. “I mean, I know we need it because we’re so dependent on tourism, but at the same time the cases have been rising and that’s kind of scary.”

In order to avoid the mandatory quarantine, visitors will be required to show proof they don’t have the coronavirus.

RELATED: United Airlines sending ‘gut punch’ furlough warnings to 36K workers

Original Article

Biden says some funding should ‘absolutely’ be redirected from police

closeFox News Flash top headlines for July 8Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for July 8

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

Joe Biden said in an interview Wednesday that some funding should “absolutely” be redirected from police, amid calls from some in his party to "defund the police" in the wake of the protests across the country.

Biden's campaign has said he does not support defunding the police. But in a Now This interview with activist Ady Barkan, the presumptive Democratic nominee said that police forces don’t need surplus military equipment, saying this is what leads them to “become the enemy” in a community.

“But do we agree that we can redirect some of the [police] funding?” Barkan asked Biden.

“Yes, absolutely,” said the former vice president.

Biden went on to call for police reforms.

"One of the things that we also need to be doing is fundamentally changing way we deal with our prison system," he said. "It should be a rehabilitation system, not a punishment system. We’re going to make sure you're qualified for every single right you had before you went to prison if you served your time."

BIDEN COMES OUT AGAINST DEFUNDING POLICE

In early June, the Biden campaign said that Biden does not believe that police should be defunded.

“As his criminal justice proposal made clear months ago, Vice President Biden does not believe that police should be defunded,” Biden campaign Rapid Response Director Andrew Bates said at the time. “He hears and shares the deep grief and frustration of those calling out for change, and is driven to ensure that justice is done and that we put a stop to this terrible pain.”

Bates added that Biden supports “the urgent need for reform,” which he said includes “funding for public schools, summer programs, and mental health and substance abuse treatment separate from funding for policing — so that officers can focus on the job of policing.”

The Biden campaign has pointed to the former vice president’s criminal justice plan, which proposes an additional $300 million for community policing. Bates said that the funding would “improve relationships between officers and residents” and would “provide the training that is needed to avert tragic, unjustifiable deaths.”

“This funding would also go toward diversifying police departments so that they resemble the communities in which they serve,” Bates added, noting that there is need for “additional funding for body-worn cameras.”

In response to Biden's new comments, Trump 2020 campaign rapid response director Andrew Clark wrote on Twitter it looked like Biden had “changed his position” on defunding police, adding a clip from the Now This interview.

But Biden's campaign denied it signaled a change in his position.

“I'd like to thank Donald Trump – for hiring an illiterate comms staff. Biden is running on *more* COPS funding for community policing,” Bates, Biden’s director of rapid response, shot back. “The same sentiment you're taking out of context RE: local budgets is *in* the articles about him opposing defunding.”

Biden in the interview also said he believes it is the job of the federal government to "go in" and "systemically change what's going on."

He specifically called for banning no-knock warrants and improving police transparency.

"This whole idea of no-knock warrants in drug cases is bizarre, it just invites trouble," Biden said. "There's a fundamental need for transparency and access to police records when they have misconduct charges against them.

Fox News' Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Original Article

Maryland’s Hogan launches book tour amid 2024 speculation

closeGov. Larry Hogan says COVID-19 is still escalating in MarylandVideo

Gov. Larry Hogan says COVID-19 is still escalating in Maryland

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan weighs in on getting the economy back on track in a safe way and how the federal government is responding to his state's needs on 'America Together: Returning to Work.'

Gov. Larry Hogan realizes that his new book release and tour raises eyebrows about the Maryland Republican’s potential 2024 White House ambitions.

“I know that there’s speculation,” the two-term governor told Fox News on Wednesday, the day after he announced he’d kick off a virtual book tour on July 28 for his new memoir “Still Standing: Surviving Cancer, Riots, a Global Pandemic and the Toxic Politics that Divide America.”

2020 IS STILL UP IN THE AIR BUT THERE'S ALREADY BUZZ ABOUT THE 2024 GOP PRESIDENTIAL FIELD

But Hogan – who last year grabbed attention by visiting the first-in-the-nation presidential primary state of New Hampshire as he mulled a 2020 primary challenge against President Trump – emphasized that any possible 2024 run “really wasn’t the purpose of the book.”

“It’s really not launching any kind of campaign effort,” he stressed. “It’s far too early for that. We’ve still go 100-some days till this election and four years after that. I’ve got a pretty important day job that I’ve got to be focused on for another 31 months.”

Hogan – who currently heads the National Governors Association (NGA) – said he’s not interested in a 2022 Senate run in Maryland. But asked about his White House ambitions, the moderate Republican governor pointed out that “a lot of people have been encouraging me to consider that as they did in this current election. We haven’t ruled it out. It’s a long way off though.”

“I am governor until January of 2023 and I’ve got work left to do and I’m still enjoying leading the governors association,” he added.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

His leadership role as chair of the NGA in helping coordinate the states as they respond to the coronavirus pandemic has further raised his national profile. The 64-year-old Hogan spotlights his experience in his memoir.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan delivers a briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, in Annapolis, Maryland

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan delivers a briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, in Annapolis, Maryland

“I finished most of the book and turned it in on Feb. 1, just before the pandemic,” he explained. “We delayed the publication for nearly two months, which is as long as the publisher would allow us to push it off, because I didn’t want it to come out while we were so busy dealing with the state of emergency.”

He said that the publisher asked him to add some chapters about combating the coronavirus.

“I talk a lot about in the book dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and the economic crisis and dealing with the White House and chairing the nation’s governors. I think it makes for a more timely and interesting book.”

Hogan – who’s not shy about critiquing the president – told Fox News that “I haven’t hesitated to criticize when I though the president and/or the administration was not doing something that was the federal response that they should have been. I’ve been very open about that.”

But he added that “I’ve made it a point also not to just Monday morning quarterback and criticize unnecessarily in the middle of the crisis. We’re trying to work together. I’ve been pretty clear about the things I thought have gone wrong. I talk about those things a lot in the book and I talk about some of the things that went well. I’m going to continue to do everything I can to get them (the Trump administration) to work with the states and do a better job.”

Hogan’s virtual book tour will include events with former GOP Govs. Chris Christie of New Jersey, Arnold Schwarzenegger of California, and Jeb Bush of Florida, as well as former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who served under President George W. Bush.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan signs the famed wooden eggs during a visit to the New Hampshire Institute of Politics as he mulled a primary challenge against President Trump, in Manchester, N.H. on April 23, 2019

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan signs the famed wooden eggs during a visit to the New Hampshire Institute of Politics as he mulled a primary challenge against President Trump, in Manchester, N.H. on April 23, 2019

Hogan, who won reelection in 2018 to a second term steering the blue state of Maryland, said in his book, “I do talk about my vision. My thoughts about where the Republican Party’s future should be. About the broken politics in America and how we should fix it. Some ideas about where the country should head.”

Asked if there will be an appetite for such ideas among 2024 Republican primary voters, the governor predicted that “the vast majority of people in America – regardless of what happens in this November’s election – are going to remain really frustrated with the political process – and regardless of who wins.”

He forecast that “people are going to be looking for a different direction. I think people are frustrated with the divisiveness and dysfunction and the state of our politics today. It’s hard to tell how wide that audience is.”

The memoir’s jacket describes Hogan – who’s the son of a congressman – as an underdog who became a hero – spotlighting that he saved “his state from fiscal catastrophe” by staring down “entrenched political bosses.” Many Maryland Democrats may take umbrage with that description, arguing that the Republican governor has resisted progressive change.

But Hogan touted that “I’ve done pretty well over the past six years charting a different path and a different course here in the bluest state in the country and it’s worked very well.”

And he noted optimistically that “I think if we can do that here in Maryland, there’s probably a wider audience for that in the country.”

Original Article

White House economic adviser Kudlow says U.S. relationship with Mexico getting stronger

White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks with reporters at the White House, Thursday, June 25, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:39 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow touted a successful meeting with Mexiccan President Andrés Manuel López Obrador at the White House this week.

While speaking to reporters Wednesday, the U.S. National Economic Council director said the U.S.-Mexico relationship is getting stronger, especially in terms of trade and border security.

“Our relationship with Mexico seems to get better and better,” he stated. “Cooperation everywhere not only on trade deal, but on various security measures including the border stuff…they’ve been very helpful.”

FILE – In this Dec. 10. 2019 file photo, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speaks during an event to sign an update to the North American Free Trade Agreement, at the National Palace in Mexico City. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)

Kudlow went on to say Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau opted not to attend the event to abide by Canada’s strict coronavirus guidelines. He said Trudeau’s decision will not affect the new trilateral trade deal between the three nations.

A spokesperson for Trudeau, Chantal Gagnon said, ““while there were recent discussions about the possible participation of Canada, the prime minister will be in Ottawa this week for scheduled Cabinet meetings and the long-planned sitting of Parliament.”

RELATED: White House trade adviser Navarro speaks out on mask wearing

Original Article

States suing Secy. Devos, Dept. of Education

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, with Vice President Mike Pence, speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing at the Department of Education building Wednesday, July 8, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:19 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Michigan has joined a lawsuit against the Department of Education. On Tuesday, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced the state has joined a lawsuit filed by six other states, including California, Maine, New Mexico and Wisconsin.

The lawsuit has accused Education Secretary Betsy Devos of using the rule-making power of her department to redirect CARES Act funds away from public schools and towards private institutions.

While speaking on the matter, Whitmer claimed CARES Act funds were intended to support low-income communities during the pandemic and accused Devos of trying to advance a privatization agenda.

“CARES Act dollars are designed to provide support to schools in low-income areas, but Betsy DeVos and the Trump administration have a different plan,” claimed the Michigan governor. “Under their new rule, private schools in affluent districts may receive services.”

Devos has denied the claims of the suit. However, she stated that since the pandemic has affected all communities, it stands to reason private school students should also have access to the funds.

RELATED: Acting DHS Secy. Cuccinelli: New ICE rule to encourage schools to reopen

Original Article

White House blasts Mary Trump’s book

This combination photo shows the cover art for “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man”, left, and a portrait of author Mary L. Trump, Ph.D. The book, written by the niece of President Donald J. Trump, was originally set for release on July 28, but will now arrive on July 14. (Simon & Schuster, left, and Peter Serling/Simon & Schuster via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:48 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

White House officials are firing back at the new book written by President Trump’s niece and clinical psychologist Mary Trump.

On Tuesday, top administration officials, including Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway and White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany, denounced the contents by claiming there’s no truth to them.

“As for books generally, obviously they’re not fact checked. Nobody’s under oath. I know there’s always this rush to slap credibility on whoever’s getting the president that day. Your job is to get the story, not get the president…and I think family matters are family matters.”

— Kellyanne Conway, Counselor to the President

Deputy press secretary Sarah Matthews also criticized the book by saying a portion accusing the president of paying someone to take his SAT’s is “completely false.”

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a press briefing at the White House, Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

“No response, other than it’s a book of falsehoods and that’s about it…it’s ridiculous, absurd allegations that have absolute no bearing in truth,” said McEnany. “Have yet to see the book, but it is a book of falsehoods.”

Mary, who is the daughter of President Trump’s eldest brother Fred Trump Junior, has come under immense fire recently for the controversial book “Too Much and Never Enough: How my Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.”

Her alleged “tell all” book describes the president as a deeply troubled person, believing it to be a result of a dysfunctional family. She said a slew of problems took a psychological toll on the president, including emotional abuse from his father and the death of her father due to alcoholism.

However, White House officials stressed Mary is not the president’s psychologist and think the book stems from family business. The book was scheduled to come out late this month, but high demand prompted publishers to move the release date up to July 14.

MORE NEWS: ICE steps up partnerships with local law enforcement

Original Article

White House economic adviser Kudlow says U.S. relationship with Mexico getting stronger

White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks with reporters at the White House, Thursday, June 25, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:39 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow touted a successful meeting with Mexiccan President Andrés Manuel López Obrador at the White House this week.

While speaking to reporters Wednesday, the U.S. National Economic Council director said the U.S.-Mexico relationship is getting stronger, especially in terms of trade and border security.

“Our relationship with Mexico seems to get better and better,” he stated. “Cooperation everywhere not only on trade deal, but on various security measures including the border stuff…they’ve been very helpful.”

FILE – In this Dec. 10. 2019 file photo, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speaks during an event to sign an update to the North American Free Trade Agreement, at the National Palace in Mexico City. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)

Kudlow went on to say Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau opted not to attend the event to abide by Canada’s strict coronavirus guidelines. He said Trudeau’s decision will not affect the new trilateral trade deal between the three nations.

A spokesperson for Trudeau, Chantal Gagnon said, ““while there were recent discussions about the possible participation of Canada, the prime minister will be in Ottawa this week for scheduled Cabinet meetings and the long-planned sitting of Parliament.”

RELATED: White House trade adviser Navarro speaks out on mask wearing

Original Article

States suing Secy. Devos, Dept. of Education

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, with Vice President Mike Pence, speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing at the Department of Education building Wednesday, July 8, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:19 AM PT — Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Michigan has joined a lawsuit against the Department of Education. On Tuesday, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced the state has joined a lawsuit filed by six other states, including California, Maine, New Mexico and Wisconsin.

The lawsuit has accused Education Secretary Betsy Devos of using the rule-making power of her department to redirect CARES Act funds away from public schools and towards private institutions.

While speaking on the matter, Whitmer claimed CARES Act funds were intended to support low-income communities during the pandemic and accused Devos of trying to advance a privatization agenda.

“CARES Act dollars are designed to provide support to schools in low-income areas, but Betsy DeVos and the Trump administration have a different plan,” claimed the Michigan governor. “Under their new rule, private schools in affluent districts may receive services.”

Devos has denied the claims of the suit. However, she stated that since the pandemic has affected all communities, it stands to reason private school students should also have access to the funds.

RELATED: Acting DHS Secy. Cuccinelli: New ICE rule to encourage schools to reopen

Original Article

Gridlock over the gridiron: The long struggle between Congress and the Washington Redskins

closeWashington Redskins conducting review of team nameVideo

Washington Redskins conducting review of team name

Reaction and analysis from Fox Business' Charles Payne.

There’s a long and messy history between Congress and the Washington Redskins.

This goes back decades.

The Redskins started to look for a new stadium site back in the early 1990s. The team was on the outer orbit of its glory years, seizing three Super Bowl titles in 1983, 1988 and 1992. But there was concern about Redskins’ home field, RFK Stadium. RFK Stadium (originally named “DC Stadium”) was the first “modern,” circular, multi-purpose stadium built in the U.S. for baseball and football. RFK’s design later gave rise to imitators such as Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati and Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh.

Washington D.C. lacked a Major League Baseball team since the second iteration of the Washington Senators decamped from the capital to become the Texas Rangers at the end of the 1971 season. The configuration of RFK Stadium to host baseball and football made it smaller than some NFL venues. And with the Redskins serving as the (burgundy and) gold standard for NFL franchises for more than a decade, the team hoped to build a larger, football-only arena.

The team considered multiple sites around the Washington region. “Potomac Yard,” an abandoned and polluted railyard straddling Arlington County and the city of Alexandria in Northern, Va., was long considered to be the frontrunner for a new site. But in 1992, the City of Alexandria balked at the proposal, forcing then-Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke to look elsewhere for new digs.

PRESIDENT TRUMP DEFENDS REDSKINS, INDIANS FRANCHISE NAMES: 'THEY NAME TEAMS OUT OF STRENGTH, NOT WEAKNESS'

Enter a tract of unused, federal land adjacent to the Redskins current home, slightly northeast of RFK Stadium.

The team was interested in this site in D.C., because it was in D.C. and practically up the street from RFK. Fans could still use the same Metro, the Stadium/Armory stop, to get to the games. And, like many teams, the easiest place to build a new stadium is right next to the old one. Miller Park in Milwaukee was constructed just steps from County Stadium, home to the Brewers. What is now called Guaranteed Rate Field was erected behind old Comiskey Park, home turf of the Chicago White Sox.

Cooke hoped to build a $206 million, 78,000-seat stadium in what was one of RFK’s parking lots.

But this is where things got complicated for the Redskins.

Redskins announce thorough review amid pressure to change NFL team nameVideo

Former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell always cut a different figure in the halls of Congress.

Campbell served in the House as a Democrat, then switched to the GOP a few years after his election to the Senate. A member of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Campbell was the only Native American in Congress at the time.

Campbell wore his hair in a salt-and-pepper ponytail; fashioned traditional, Native American jewelry on the side; and eschewed neckties, de rigueur for Senate attire, in favor of bolos when appearing on the floor. If you were a reporter and looking for Campbell, you could always tell if the senator was in the Capitol if you knew where to look–outside the Senate Carriage Entrance to see if Campbell parked his Harley-Davidson Softail nearby.

Campbell competed as a member of the U.S. Judo team at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Years later, while serving in the House, a would-be mugger accosted Campbell as he walked home after late night votes. The mugger picked the wrong person to mess with.

And, as fate would have it, the Redskins picked the wrong senator to mess with, too.

REDSKINS' MINORITY OWNERS LOOKING TO SELL STAKES AMID NAME-CHANGE DILEMMA: REPORTS

“The name `Redskins' is highly offensive to Native Americans because it conjures up bad stereotypical images of Indians,” Campbell said in the summer of 1993. “Since Mr. Cooke has steadfastly refused to change the name of the team and he wants to build his new stadium on federally controlled land, we want to have some say as to what conditions will be imposed on its tenants."

Repurposing the federal tract of land adjacent to RFK Stadium would likely require congressional sign-off. And, Campbell threatened to block such a development unless the team changed its name.

Cooke countered that there was “nothing in the world" wrong with the team name. The club argued the Redskins moniker served as an homage to the traditions and strength of Native Americans.

Former NFL player Merril Hoge reacts to Washington Redskins under pressure to change nameVideo

Campbell drafted a bill barring the RFK parking lot be used “by any person or organization exploiting any racial or ethnic group or using nomenclature that includes a reference to real or alleged physical characteristics of Native Americans or other groups of human beings.”

So, Cooke, dismissed by Virginia, D.C. and the Senate, went about constructing a stadium in suburban Maryland. Many thought Cooke’s move was a negotiating ploy.

It wasn’t. The Redskins name stuck. Cooke finally earned approval to get his new stadium in Landover, Md. Cooke called the new location Raljohn, a combination of Cooke’s sons, Ralph and John. The Redskins played their final game at RFK on December 22, 1996, defeating the archrival Dallas Cowboys 37-10.

The Redskins moved into what initially Jack Kent Cooke Stadium– now FedEx Field– for the 1997 campaign. Cooke, who hoped to move his team to a new venue by 1995, never got to see the new arena. He died in the spring of 1997. Dan Snyder took control of the team and the Redskins lost their luster both on and off the field.

REDSKINS TO CONDUCT 'THOROUGH REVIEW' OF TEAM NAME AMID INTENSE SCRUTINY

Snyder famously told USA Today that he would “never” change the name of the team. “It’s that simple. NEVER – you can use caps.”

Just as Cooke wrestled with Campbell, Snyder soon encountered another foe from the west: former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

Reid undertook a pet project during the final years of his service on Capitol Hill. A federal court cancelled the team’s trademark in 2014. That seemed to invigorate Reid. Rather than tussling with Republicans, the Nevada Democrat would routinely come to the Senate floor to personally blast Snyder and implore him to change the team name. Reid described the club as “a racist franchise,” even hoping for the team to lose games.

Considering the team’s fates of late, the Redskins probably didn’t need any intercessions from Reid.

US Patent Office cancels Redskins' trademark registrationVideo

After the “Deflategate” controversy with the New England Patriots, Reid beseeched NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to “act as swiftly and decisively changing the name of the DC team as he did about not enough air in a football.”

Reid and other Senate Democrats crafted legislation to end the NFL’s tax exempt status if it didn’t order a change in the team’s name.

"It is not right that the National Football League continues to denigrate an entire population," said Reid in 2015, noting the 27 Native American tribes he represented in Nevada. “Every time they hear this name is a sad reminder of a long tradition of racism and bigotry.”

Reid predicted that eventually “the name will change.”

The team says that’s now on the table.

The Redskins have shrunk the size of FedEx field over the years. It once ballooned to a staggering 91,000 seats, the largest seating capacity in the NFL. But the stadium’s now receded to 82,000, and the team struggles to fill it up. Parking and transportation to and from the stadium have been a nightmare since the beginning. Fans regard FedEx Field as one of the worst in the NFL.

And so the Redskins are again looking for a new home – potentially in the District of Columbia.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

No one’s used RFK Stadium in years. The Washington Nationals played there for a few seasons after the Expos moved from Montreal in 2005. But the Nats have had their own park since 2008. D.C. United played at RFK from its inception in 1996 through 2017. But the soccer club now has its own pitch at nearby Audi Field.

Once regal RFK stadium is now a dilapidated shell of itself. It’s due to be razed next year.

Redskins quarterback suffers gruesome injuryVideo

That’s why there’s chatter that the team’s old site may be the perfect spot for a new arena.

Washington, D.C.’s Democratic Mayor Murial Bowser and the city’s non-voting representative in Congress, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat, would love to have the local football team back in the District of Columbia. Norton would like the team to play at the RFK location – if they change the name.

Norton says she would author a bill to retool the RFK site for construction of a new stadium if the franchise abandons the current nickname.

Original Article

Alexander Vindman, Trump impeachment witness, retires from military

closeTrump: Whole building applauded when Vindman was escorted outVideo

Trump: Whole building applauded when Vindman was escorted out

President Trump speaks with Geraldo Rivera on his podcast.

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a key impeachment witness against President Trump, retired from the Army Wednesday, with his lawyer citing "a campaign of bullying, intimidation and retaliation" for limiting his military career.

Vindman marked his retirement by tweeting a picture of himself in a rumpled plaid shirt working on a laptop — a stark contrast to the many photos of him in uniform.

"Today I officially requested retirement from the US Army, an organization I love. My family and I look forward to the next chapter of our lives," Vindman posted.

Vindman already was fired in February from the National Security Council and escorted off the White House grounds two days after the Senate acquitted Trump in his impeachment trial. His twin brother, Lt. Col. Yevgeny Vindman, was also ousted from the NSC at the same time.

Alexander Vindman served for 21 years in the military, but retired because "it has been made clear that his future within the institution he has dutifully served will forever be limited," David Pressman, Vindman lawyer's, said.

IMPEACHMENT WITNESS VINDMAN FIRED, ESCORTED OUT OF WHITE HOUSE AFTER TRUMP ACQUITTAL

In a lengthy statement, Pressman said Vindman was bullied by Trump and his proxies for answering a subpoena from Congress to testify.

DUCKWORTH VOWS TO BLOCK OVER 1,000 MILITARY CONFIRMATIONS UNTIL PENTAGON PROVES VINDMAN WILL BE PROMOTED

"LTC Vindman’s patriotism has cost him his career," said Pressman, a former ambassador to the United Nations for Special Political Affairs. "Today our country loses a devoted soldier, but it is incumbent upon all of us to ensure it does not lose the values he represents."

Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, and National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, are sworn in before they testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump's efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, and National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, are sworn in before they testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump's efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Congressional Democrats have accused Trump of retaliating against impeachment witnesses, including Vindman and U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, who was recalled from his position.

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., last Thursday announced her intention to block Senate confirmations for 1,123 senior U.S. Armed Forces promotions until Defense Secretary Mark Esper confirms he will not block the "expected and deserved" promotion for Vindman, an Iraq war veteran.

Duckworth, also an Iraq War veteran who served as a helicopter pilot, accused Trump of trying to politicize the armed forces.

“Our military is supposed to be the ultimate meritocracy," Duckworth said in a statement last week. "It is simply unprecedented and wrong for any Commander in Chief to meddle in routine military matters at all, whether or not he has a personal vendetta against a soldier who did his patriotic duty and told the truth—a soldier who has been recommended for promotion by his superiors because of his performance."

GORDON SONDLAND RECALLED AS AMBASSADOR TO EU AFTER IMPEACHMENT TESTIMONY

News of Vindman's retirement prompted an immediate show of support from other Democrats in Congress.

"Remember that in the hardest and darkest of times you stood with honor," tweeted Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., a Marine Corps veteran. "History will remember you. Your service to this county is not done."

Fox News' Lillian LeCroy, Louis Casiano, John Roberts, Brooke Singman and Lucas Tomlinson contributed to this report.

Original Article

Supreme Court expected to issue rulings Thursday in Trump tax returns, financial records cases

closeSupreme Court rules in favor of Little Sister of the Poor in Obamacare contraceptive caseVideo

Supreme Court rules in favor of Little Sister of the Poor in Obamacare contraceptive case

The Supreme Court rules that the Trump administration acted within its authority when it expanded exemptions to the Affordable Care Act’s requirement for employers to provide insurance coverage.

The Supreme Court is expected to release their final three opinions of current term on Thursday, two of them having to do with subpoenas for President Trump's financial records, including his tax returns.

One involves two consolidated cases in which Democrat-led House committees are seeking records from accounting firm Mazars USA, Deutsche Bank, and Capital One, while the other involves grand jury subpoenas from the Manhattan District Attorney's office to Mazars and the Trump Organization.

SUPREME COURT RULES IN FAVOR OF LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR IN OBAMACARE CONTRACEPTION CASE

A House Oversight Committee subpoena of Mazars seeks access to a slew of Trump financial documents dating back to 2011, including personal records and records of various affiliated businesses and entities. Democrats pursued the subpoena after former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen testified to Congress that the president's accountants routinely and improperly altered his financial statements — including some signed by Mazars — to misrepresent his assets and liabilities.

That case was joined with one centered on the House Intelligence and Financial Services Committees' subpoenas of Deutsche Bank and Capital One for Trump's financial records, which may or may not include his tax returns, as Deutsche Bank has claimed they do not have them.

SUPREME COURT RULES RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS SHIELDED FROM TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION CLAIMS

A point of contention is whether the committees have the authority to seek the documents.

Trump claims that the committees do not have the requisite legislative authority to seek the records. The Oversight Committee insists that they are exploring whether they need to change government ethics laws, the Financial Services Committee claims they are looking into financial regulators’ supervision of the banking industry and the effectiveness of anti-money laundering laws.

The Intelligence Committee claims it is looking into whether Russia or any other foreign actor has leverage over Trump or coordinated with his 2016 campaign. So far, the committees have been successful, as the D.C. Circuit and Second Circuit Courts of Appeals ruled in their favor.

The other decision will deal with Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance's office's grand jury subpoenas seeking documents from Mazars and the Trump Organization, including Trump's tax returns. The subpoenas are part of an investigation of possible state crimes related to a payment made to Stormy Daniels in exchange for her silence regarding allegations of an affair between her and Trump.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The president contends that according to the Constitution's Supremacy Clause, a state court should not be allowed to investigate a sitting president. Lower courts disagreed and ruled that prosecutors are able to enforce the subpoenas.

Should prosecutors win this case, that does not mean that Trump's tax returns would be made public, as state rules of criminal procedure say that grand jury proceedings and evidence are to be kept secret and may only be released pursuant to a court order.

Original Article

CDC is ‘prepared to work with every school district’ for safe reopenings, director says in coronavirus briefing

closeVP Pence: 'Early indications' coronavirus flattening in AZ, FL, TXVideo

VP Pence: 'Early indications' coronavirus flattening in AZ, FL, TX

Vice President Mike Pence provides an update on the coronavirus pandemic

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield on Wednesday said the agency is “prepared to work with every school district” to create a safe reopening this fall for students amid the coronavirus pandemic.

During the White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing on Wednesday, Redfield said the CDC has outlined "a number of strategies” for schools across the country to use while reimagining the 2020-2021 school year amid COVID-19.

TRUMP SAYS HE DISAGREES WITH CDC GUIDELINES TO REOPEN SCHOOLS, CALLS THEM 'IMPRACTICAL'

“We are prepared to work with each school jurisdiction to help them use the different strategies we proposed, and use them safely to come up with an optimal strategy for their school,” Redfield explained. “It would be personally disappointing to me if we saw individuals using those guidelines as a rationale for not reopening schools.”

Redfield added that schools and children are typically “an instrument of transmission with influenza” but noted that the agency does “not have evidence children are driving the transmission cycle” with the novel coronavirus.

“We’re prepared to work with every school, every district to find the right mixture of strategies to do this safely,” Redfield said. “Our recommendations are not prescriptive…there are lots of different options.”

Redfield’s comments come after President Trump, early Wednesday, said he disagreed with the CDC’s recommendations, calling them “very tough & expensive” and “impractical.”

Vice President Pence, on Wednesday, explained that the president’s comments simply were to underscore Redfield’s—that “we don’t want guidance from the CDC to be a reason for schools not to reopen.”

TRUMP VOWS 'PRESSURE' ON GOVERNOR TO REOPEN SCHOOLS IN THE FALL

“We want to partner with states to find a way to meet their needs,” Pence said. “I think the president’s statement this morning was reflective of that desire.”

Pence added that the administration is “confident,” and noted that states are beginning to publish plans for reopening.

“We reiterated to governors this week that we’re here to partner with them,” Pence continued. “I think the president was saying that, if there are aspects of the CDC guidelines that are prescriptive or serve as a barrier to kids getting back to school, we want governors and education officials to know we want to work with them to support their [efforts to reopen.]”

Educators, parents consider school re-opening plansVideo

Pence also addressed Trump’s threats this week to cut funding for schools, noting that he is simply pushing to “get kids back to school because that’s where they belong.”

“We know based on what our best health officials tell us that we can do that in a safe and responsible way,” Pence said. “The president is just very serious. He believes and we believe that it is absolutely essential for our children’s academic, social and emotional and nutritional needs to be back in the classroom and we’re going to provide leadership from the federal level to do that.”

BIDEN 'OF COURSE' WANTS SCHOOLS TO REOPEN IN THE FALL, CAMPAIGN SAYS IT MUST BE DONE 'SAFELY'

He added: “I sense a great desire among governors around the country to find a way forward and we made it very clear to them we’re going to partner with them and give them the resources.”

Meanwhile, Pence also noted that the administration is “encouraged” by the mortality numbers, noting that “the average fatality rate continues to be low and steady.”

Pence said that the mortality rate this week is “90 percent lower than at the height of the pandemic.”

“We pledge to work 24 hours a day to continue to keep our losses low,” Pence said.

As of Wednesday, the United States reported more than 3 million positive cases of the novel coronavirus and more than 131,000 deaths.

Original Article