Democratic lawmaker blasts Pelosi’s House recess as ‘absurd’

closeCoronavirus stimulus negotiations hits a new wallVideo

Coronavirus stimulus negotiations hits a new wall

The negotiations between the Republicans and Democrats over a new coronavirus economic relief package are facing new obstacles.

Rep. Ro Khanna, a California Democrat, called the House's planned monthlong recess "absurd" and urged Congress to continue working on coronavirus relief legislation.

Khanna, a progressive, said he's remained in Washington advocating for a deal between Congress and the White House.

REP. RO KHANNA'S BIG IDEA: BRINGING SILICON VALLEY JOBS TO RURAL AMERICA

"I think Congress should be in session," Khanna said Tuesday during a Facebook town hall with his constituents. "I think it's absurd for Congress to be going on a break during a pandemic and a national crisis."

Democratic U.S. Rep. Ro Khanna speaks at a climate rally with presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders and Rep. Rashida Tlaib in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S. January 12, 2020. REUTERS/Scott Morgan - RC2LEE9GVZ01

Democratic U.S. Rep. Ro Khanna speaks at a climate rally with presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders and Rep. Rashida Tlaib in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S. January 12, 2020. REUTERS/Scott Morgan – RC2LEE9GVZ01

The last time the House took votes was Friday, July 31. No votes are expected in the House until the week of Sept. 14 unless both parties can reach a deal on a coronavirus stimulus package.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., had been in talks with the White House in recent weeks over a stimulus deal, but they are still not close on finding common ground. Democrats had wanted at least $3 trillion in aid, while the GOP pitched a $1 trillion plan.

TRUMP ORDERS $400-PER-WEEK UNEMPLOYMENT PAYMENTS AMID COVID CRISIS, HITS DEMS FOR STONEWALLING

Typically, the House and Senate go on recess during the month of August. But with the pandemic raging, a devastating economic crisis and racial unrest simmering, Khanna said he's concerned that Congress is on the sidelines.

"I don't think this is a smart move to recess and I agree with you," Khanna said in response to a constituent's question. "I share your frustration."

WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS?

Original Article

US introduces updated draft Security Council resolution to extend Iran arms embargo

closeAmb. Kelly Craft on push to extend Iran arms embargo, human rights issues in ChinaVideo

Amb. Kelly Craft on push to extend Iran arms embargo, human rights issues in China

The U.S. on Tuesday introduced an updated and more streamlined draft Security Council resolution that would extend a thirteen-year arms embargo on Iran that is due to expire in October — and that the U.S. has promised to extend.

The technical rollover draft resolution, a short four paragraphs, would simply extend the embargo “until the Security Council decides otherwise.”

US PUSHES FOR UN SECURITY COUNCIL VOTE TO EXTEND EXPIRING IRAN ARMS EMBARGO

“The United States has engaged in good-faith diplomacy for months," U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Kelly Craft said in a statement to Fox News. "The draft we have put forward today takes Council views into account and simply does what everyone knows should be done – extend the arms embargo to prevent Iran from freely buying and selling conventional weapons. It is only common sense that the world’s #1 state sponsor of terror not be given the means of unleashing even greater harm on the world.”

Reuters, which first obtained the resolution, reported that the U.S. has asked for comments on the text by 10 a.m. ET Wednesday morning.

The initial draft, according to Bloomberg News, had called upon all member states to halt all sales of weapons to and from Iran and, “to refrain from providing any technical training, financial resources or services, advice, other services or assistance related to the supply, sale, transfer, manufacture, maintenance or use of arms,” to Iran.

One Security Council diplomat told Fox News before today’s updated draft resolution was released that Russia and China, who have signaled they will not be voting for the U.S. draft, would not need to use their veto since the diplomat didn’t believe the United States had the nine votes needed to put the veto in play. With the latest change the two permanent members of the council might now be forced to use their veto.

The Trump administration said last week that it intends to seek a vote in the Security Council this week to extend the embargo, which is due to expire as part of the 2015 Iran deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

The administration left the accord in 2018, but the U.S. retains rights under a U.N. Security Council Resolution, which enshrined the deal and the U.S. has argued gives it the ability to “snap back” the embargo unilaterally, even if the Security Council does not vote for an extension.

BRIAN HOOK, US SPECIAL ENVOY FOR IRAN, TO STEP DOWN; ELLIOTT ABRAMS TO TAKE POST

The U.S. says it would rather have the Security Council vote to extend the embargo, but has not ruled out acting unilaterally should the resolution fail to gather enough votes or be met by a veto from Russia or China.

"We have made it very clear that the U.S. will use every tool in our toolbox to make certain that the arms embargo is renewed," U.S. Ambassador Kelly Craft said on Fox News' "The Story" on Monday.

A diplomatic source told Fox News that current planning would bring a vote on the U.S. resolution on Friday. And if the vote fails Friday, a U.S. official says the administration would inform the Security Council next week that it intends to trigger the snapback process.

US pushes UN to extend Iran arms embargoVideo

The U.S. has been engaging in a “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran in order to pressure the Iranian regime to stop its destabilizing activities in the region and its funding of terrorist groups. That has included the imposition of sanctions on Iranian institutions and top officials — as well as taking out Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in an airstike earlier this year.

Officials have warned that the expiration of the embargo would allow Iran to buy fighter jets, attack choppers, tanks, submarines and missiles with a range of up to 300 km.

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Craft on Monday said that Russia and China "are waiting to be able to sell arms to Iran" and warned that those weapons could then be exported to terror groups in countries such as Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Lybia and Lebanon.

"We have no other choice than to renew the arms embargo and promote peace and security around the world," she said.

Fox News' Rich Edson contributed to this report.

Original Article

Trump campaign blasts ‘phony’ Kamala Harris in ad, says Biden pick reflects ‘extreme agenda’

closeJoe Biden names Kamala Harris as VP pickVideo

Joe Biden names Kamala Harris as VP pick

Lawrence Jones reacts to Joe Biden naming Kamala Harris as his 2020 running mate

The Trump campaign on Tuesday blasted Joe Biden’s running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris, as a “phony,” while saying the choice reflects the former vice president’s “extreme agenda.”

Biden announced that Harris, D-Calif., would be his running mate in a statement Tuesday, calling her “the best person” to challenge President Trump and Vice President Pence, and “to lead this nation.”

JOE BIDEN ANNOUNCES SEN. KAMALA HARRIS AS HIS RUNNING MATE

But just shortly after the announcement, Trump campaign senior adviser Katrina Pierson blasted the move, citing past clashes between Biden and Harris during the Democratic primary.

“Not long ago, Kamala Harris called Joe Biden a racist and asked for an apology she never received. Clearly, Phony Kamala will abandon her own morals, as well as try to bury her record as a prosecutor, in order to appease the anti-police extremists controlling the Democrat Party,” Pierson said.

“In her failed attempt at running for president, Kamala Harris gleefully embraced the left’s radical manifesto, calling for trillions of dollars in new taxes and backing Bernie Sanders’ government takeover of healthcare She is proof that Joe Biden is an empty shell being filled with the extreme agenda of the radicals on the left,” she continued. “Joe Biden is no moderate, and with Harris as his ‘political living will,’ he is surrendering control of our nation to the radical mob with promises to raise taxes, cut police funding, kill energy jobs, open our borders, and appease socialist dictators.”

She added: “At the ballot box, Americans will resoundingly reject the abysmal failures of Biden-Harris in favor of the America First strength of President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence.”

Just minutes later, President Trump tweeted his campaign’s new ad, blasting Harris as a “phony.”

“Kamala Harris ran for president by rushing to the radical left,” the ad said, noting she embraced Sanders’ plan for socialized medicine, called for “trillions in new taxes,” and attacked Biden for “racist policies.”

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEN. KAMALA HARRIS

“Voters rejected Harris. They smartly spotted a phony,” the ad said. “But not Joe Biden. He’s not that smart.”

“Biden calls himself a transition candidate,” the ad continued. “He is handing over the reigns to Kamala while they jointly embrace the radical left.”

The ad concluded: “Slow Joe and Phony Kamala. Perfect together, wrong for America.”

Harris the 'safe pick,' but may not excite African American base: Tom BevanVideo

The comments from the Trump campaign came just after Biden announced Harris as his pick for vice president.

“I’ve decided that Kamala Harris is the best person to help me take this fight to Donald Trump and Mike Pence and then to lead this nation starting in January 2021,” Biden said in an email to supporters Tuesday.

TOM DEL BECCARO: KAMALA HARRIS, BIDEN'S VP PICK, VIEWS POLITICS AS A GAME

Biden also tweeted: "I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked @KamalaHarris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate.”

He added: "Back when Kamala was Attorney General, she worked closely with Beau. I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse. I was proud then, and I'm proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign.”

The decision comes after Biden and Harris publicly clashed in the primary campaign—notably when Harris drew sharp contrasts with the former vice president when she challenged him on the debate stage of his past resistance to federally mandated desegregation busing.

The pick shows a willingness from both Biden and Harris to move past their differences. The decision may have been tipped days earlier, when he was photographed with talking points saying of Harris that he does “not hold grudges” and has “great respect for her.”

The choice also fulfills a commitment the former vice president made in March to name a woman as running mate. Naming a Black woman at a time when issues of racial injustice are front-and-center also responds to signals from some circles in the party that such a choice could help build bridges with the Black community and increase Black voter turnout.

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The timing gives Biden plenty of space to re-introduce her to voters ahead of this month’s scaled-back Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Meanwhile, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel blasted Biden's pick, saying he "didn’t just select a vice-presidential candidate, he chose the person who would actually be in charge the next four years if he is somehow able to win."

"Kamala Harris’ extreme positions, from raising taxes to abolishing private health insurance to comparing law enforcement officials to the KKK, show that the left-wing mob is controlling Biden’s candidacy, just like they would control him as president," she continued. "These radical policies might be popular among liberals, but they are well outside the mainstream for most Americans."

The RNC also said that Harris should expect "an unprecedented level of scrutiny and attention," claiming she will "be seen as the president-in-waiting."

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Original Article

California Democratic congressman replies to McConnell with a vulgarity on Twitter

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In a tweet Tuesday, Rep. Harley Rouda, D-Calif., replied with a vulgarity to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in response to the senator’s tweet blaming top Democrats for the lack of a new coronavirus stimulus package.

“I hoped this week we’d be finalizing major legislation. After all, American families are struggling and need help. But Speaker Pelosi and Leader Schumer decided not to deliver. I am glad the president stepped in to soften the blow of their hostage tactics,” McConnell tweeted Monday.

To which Rouda posted a tweet in response showing a Google search bar with the phrase “How to politely tell someone to f—k off,” being entered.

STALLED CORONAVIRUS RELIEF NEGOTIATIONS HIT NEW OBSTACLE: STATE AID

Rep. Rouda could not be immediately reached for comment on his tweet, but tensions remain high in the capitol as Democrats and Republicans point the finger as to why the latest coronavirus stimulus package fell through Friday.

“As far as I know, the secretary of the Treasury and the [White House] chief of staff have not spoken to the speaker and the Democratic leader today. And so another day has gone by with an impasse and they need to get together,” McConnell told Fox News Tuesday.

Democrats sought a $3 trillion aid package that would extend the $600 unemployment weekly benefit, as well as small business aid and other protective measures. But the $3 trillion figure was a nonstarter with congressional republicans who proposed a $1 trillion aid package.

“We'll take down $1 trillion if you add $1 trillion in,” Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said in a press conference Friday. “They said absolutely not.”

The White House issued an executive order for some coronavirus relief this weekend, which would extend the weekly unemployment benefit to $400 a week and defer payroll taxes through December – a move that angered both democrats and republicans.

LARRY KUDLOW SAYS WHITE HOUSE IS WILLING TO NEGOTIATE ON COVID RELIEF IF DEMOCRATS DEMONSTRATE THEY'RE SERIOUS

Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chucker Schumer issued a joint statement over the weekend saying it did “little real help to families,” and Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Ne., called it “unconstitutional slop.”

“President Obama did not have the power to unilaterally rewrite immigration law with DACA, and President Trump does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law,” Sasse said.

Mitch McConnell on stalemate over COVID relief, President Trump's executive actions, push to hold the SenateVideo

But Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said the White House is willing to spend more on coronavirus relief and are open to talks. “The president is determined to spend what we need to spend,” Mnuchin said during an interview with CNBC Monday. “We’re prepared to put more money on the table.”

The sticking point in the stimulus package is providing state and local aid. Democrats put aside $1 trillion in additional state funding, a figure that republicans are flat rejecting.

“We’re not going to give a trillion dollars for state and local, that’s just not a reasonable approach,” Mnuchin said.

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But New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a press call Sunday that Trump’s executive order would cost the state an additional $4 billion, adding to their $30 billion deficit caused by the pandemic.

Under Trump’s relief plan, states would be required to pay 25% of the weekly benefit costs, while the federal government covers the other 75%, a move Mnuchin claims the cash-strapped states can afford.

Original Article

Kamala Harris chosen as Biden’s running mate: What to know

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After much anticipation, Joe Biden announced Tuesday his vice presidential pick would be Kamala Harris, the senator from California and his former opponent in the presidential primary.

Harris, a former prosecutor whose most high-profile moment on the presidential campaign trail came during a summer debate when she dissected Biden on his past stances on bussing students to desegregate schools, may have the take-no-prisoners attitude needed to square up against the Trump-Pence ticket.

Here are five things to know about Biden’s running mate and the potential first female vice president:

Harris would be the first black and first female vice president.

The daughter of an Indian mother and a Jamaican father, Harris checks the box for those who pressured Biden to pick a Black female running mate in light of racial injustice protests across the country.

Harris’ race played out in one of her most memorable debate moments. She challenged Biden's opposition to federally mandated busing when he was in the Senate, telling him she benefited from the program to integrate schools.

"There was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools and she was bused to school every day. That little girl was me," Harris said.

BIDEN AND HARRIS CAMPAIGNS ENGAGE IN NASTY TWITTER FEUD OVER BUSING

Harris served as California’s “top cop."

Harris served 25 years as a prosecutor in California. After spending her childhood in Oakland, California, Harris attended historically black college Howard University before attending law school at U.C. Hastings.

After law school, Harris served eight years in Alameda County District Attorney's office where she prosecuted child sexual assault cases. She served as San Francisco’s district attorney from 2004 to 2011 and California’s attorney general from 2011 to 2017.

Harris’ record as “top cop” could fire back amid a renewed focus on police brutality

Biden himself has attacked Harris’ record as a prosecutor. In a debate last August, Biden accused the California senator of keeping nonviolent prisoners behind bars during her tenure as California attorney general because they were a source of cheap labor for the state.

“What happened? Along came a federal judge and said enough is enough and he freed 1,000 of these people,” Biden said as he argued that Harris was forced by a judge to release the prisoners.

In the same debate, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard slammed Harris’ record on marijuana violations.

“She put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana,” the congresswoman argued.The figure apparently comes from a Washington Free Beacon article in February.

As Gabbard indicated, Harris has softened toward the issue since. Harris said in an interview earlier this year that she smoked marijuana as a college student, laughing at the memory.

Gabbard also charged that Harris “in the case of those who are on death row, innocent people, you blocked evidence from being revealed that would have freed them until you were forced to do so.”

The congresswoman from Hawaii was likely pointing to the murder case of Kevin Cooper – who was convicted in 1983 of a quadruple homicide. The death row inmate came close to execution in 2004 when Harris, as attorney general, denied Cooper’s request for newly advanced DNA testing. In February of this year, newly elected California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered new DNA testing.

THE FACTS BEHIND GABBARD AND BIDEN'S ATTACK ON HARRIS' RECORD

Hints were dropped that Harris could be the VP pick.

After Harris dropped out of the race and endorsed Biden’s campaign, Biden indicated that he wanted her to have a heavy hand in his campaign. "I’m so lucky to have you be a part of this partnership going forward. Working together, we can make a great deal of progress. … I’m coming for you, kid," Biden said.

In April, Harris formed a joint fundraising committee with the Democratic National Committee, meaning that the groups could raise money together with a maximum of $2,800 per contributor going to pay off Harris' presidential campaign debts and $357,800 going to the Democratic Party.

The peculiar arrangement is typically reserved for parties' presidential nominees and could indicate that Biden and the Democratic party are seriously considering Harris as a viable VP contender, and at the very least shows the national party looks favorably upon the California senator and wants her to play a major role in its 2020 strategy.

As Biden pointed out, Harris touts her tough-on-banks record.

“Back when Kamala was Attorney General, she worked closely with Beau. I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse. I was proud then, and I'm proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign,” Biden said in announcing his running mate.

Harris often promotes her record on taking banks to task during the financial crisis forcing big banks to make amends to customers hurt during the financial crisis.

During the 2008 financial crisis, a group of attorneys general, officials from Housing and Urban Development and Justice departments and others sought to address revelations that top banks had rushed through a flood of foreclosures as mortgage defaults skyrocketed.

Harris pulled her state out of national negotiations pursuing the monetary settlement from major banks, believing she could do better for her state.

Harris later reached a $25 billion settlement deal from J.P. Morgan and other banks, which she said was a much higher number than was originally on the table, but some question her influence over the deal.

Others question why the former California AG did not prosecute Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin for violating state foreclosure laws. Journalist Aaron Glantz wrote in a 2019 book that Harris allowed Mnuchin’s OneWest Bank at the time to illegally foreclose on tens of thousands of families and then tried to bury a report with the evidence.

Fox News' Tyler Olson and Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Original Article

Kamala Harris ‘honored’ to be Biden’s running mate, touts his ability to ‘unify’

closeBaier on Kamala Harris: Biden knows the VP job better than anyoneVideo

Baier on Kamala Harris: Biden knows the VP job better than anyone

Bret Baier reacts to Kamala Harris being named Joe Biden's pick for vice president.

Kamala Harris on Tuesday said she is “honored” to join the ticket as Joe Biden’s running mate, touting the former vice president’s ability to “unify the American people.”

“@JoeBiden can unify the American people because he’s spent his life fighting for us,” the Democratic senator from California tweeted. “And as president, he’ll build an America that lives up to our ideals.”

BIDEN TAPS KAMALA HARRIS AS RUNNING MATE

She added: “I’m honored to join him as our party’s nominee for Vice President, and do what it takes to make him our Commander-in-Chief.”

Harris’s tweet comes after Biden announced in an email to supporters on Tuesday afternoon that he had chosen her as his running mate, saying that he “decided that Kamala Harris is the best person to help me take this fight to Donald Trump and Mike Pence and then to lead this nation starting in January 2021.”

Biden also tweeted: "I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked @KamalaHarris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate.”

He added: "Back when Kamala was Attorney General, she worked closely with Beau. I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse. I was proud then, and I'm proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign.”

The decision comes after Biden and Harris publicly clashed in the primary campaign—notably when Harris challenged him on the debate stage of his past resistance to federally mandated desegregation busing.

TRUMP CAMPAIGN BLASTS 'PHONY' KAMALA HARRIS, SAYS BIDEN PICK REFLECTS 'EXTREME AGENDA'

The pick shows a willingness from both Biden and Harris to move past their differences. The decision may have been tipped off days earlier, when he was photographed with talking points saying of Harris that he does “not hold grudges” and has “great respect for her.”

The choice also fulfills a commitment the former vice president made in March to name a woman as running mate. Naming a Black woman at a time when issues of systemic racism are front-and-center also responds to signals from some circles in the party that such a choice could help build bridges with the Black community.

The timing gives Biden plenty of space to re-introduce her to voters ahead of this month’s scaled-back Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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Meanwhile, the Trump campaign blasted Biden's pick, calling Harris a "phony," while saying the choice reflects the former vice president’s “extreme agenda.”

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Original Article

McConnell wants blue state bailouts ‘off the table’ in coronavirus aid talks

closeMitch McConnell on COVID 'stalemate': It's a 'genuine emergency,' I 'applaud' Trump's orderVideo

Mitch McConnell on COVID 'stalemate': It's a 'genuine emergency,' I 'applaud' Trump's order

Mitch McConnell provides an update on the GOP's 'stalemate' with Democrats over a new COVID-19 relief package

Democrats' insistence that state and local governments receive federal money to close gaps in their budget as part of potential "Phase 4" coronavirus aid legislation is a non-starter, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told "Bill Hemmer Reports" Tuesday.

"This hang-up over sending over $1 trillion down to the state and local government — we've already sent them $150 billion and they've only spent 25% of what we sent them before in the [CARES Act]," McConnell said.

"So take that off the table and let's get this assistance directly to the people who need it … those whose plus-up over UI expired last Friday," he added.

MCCONNELL: DEMOCRATS TREATING PANDEMIC AS 'POLITICAL GAME' WITH RELIEF TALKS STILL STALLED

"The president is doing everything he can within his authority to get the job done. … The Democratic governors need to figure out how to work with the president and get those checks into people's hands."

Republicans have balked at sending states like New York or New Jersey large amounts of aid, seeing it as a bailout from better-run states.

"The American people are sick of the stalemate," McConnell said. "They want to get a result, and the results are to be directly related to the COVID-19 crisis. Kids back in school, jobs, healthcare, direct cash payments to low-income people who need our help. Those items should not be in dispute."

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The Republican leader added that he had not spoken with Pelosi or Schumer Tuesday, and doubted whether White House officials involved in the negotiations have either.

"We're having plenty of conversations among ourselves … as far as we know, [Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows] have not spoken to the Speaker and the Democratic Leader today and so, another day has gone by with an impasse and they need to get together.

"We are talking among ourselves a lot … but we can't make a deal without the Democrats."

Original Article

Seattle City Council votes to defund police department

Protesters block a street in front of Seattle City Hall, Monday, July 13, 2020, following a news conference where Mayor Jenny Durkan spoke critically about a plan backed by several city council members that seeks to cut the police department’s budget by 50 percent. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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UPDATED 7:57 AM PT – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

The city of Seattle will defund the police following the approval of a new city budget, which has been heavily criticized by officials who say city council members are rushing talks.

The seven-to-one decision was reached Monday. It approves a complex budget package, which would cut spending on law enforcement by 14-percent and eliminate multiple police units.

Under the new revisions, the police department’s $400 million budget will be cut by roughly $3 million. This could potentially eliminate more than 100 officers from the department.

Police Chief Carmen Best has fought against the new budget proposal. She said the changes that would reduce the salary of command staff positions feel personal.

“It is a tragedy if we do anything to hurt the compensation of people who’ve worked so hard,” she stated. “…it definitely feels personal to me”.

Police Chief Carmen Best listens, Monday, July 13, 2020, during a news conference at City Hall in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Following the decision, Chief Best announced her resignation in email sent to her department Monday night. She stated it wasn’t an easy decision to make, but believes it’s the right time.

Best took her role as chief of police back in 2018 and became the first black police chief in Seattle’s history. After serving 28 years on the force, she is set to retire effective September 2.

Mayor Jenny Durkan has also spoken out against the new budget changes by criticizing the city council for refusing to work with her office and other officials. She has urged for police budget discussions to be taken up with the 2021 city budget instead of this years.

Council member Kshama Sawant was the only person who voted against the changes. She stated that the reductions didn’t go far enough and the new budget ultimately failed the working class.

Despite this, other members on the council believe they made the right decision by marking a new chapter in Seattle’s history.

RELATED: Seattle residents speak out against defunding the police

Original Article

Sen. Chris Coons says Biden’s VP pick ‘will literally make history’

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Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said Tuesday that he did not know who Joe Biden would pick for his running mate, but made a lofty claim that the decision “will literally make history.”

Coons called Biden’s VP decision “one of the most consequential decisions” the former vice president will ever make.

“It will literally make history. And it will change, I believe, not just the arc of this campaign, but the trajectory of American history,” Coons said in an interview with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

Mitchell pressed Coons on his claim. “You said it will make history,” she said. “There have been women running mates before. Sarah Palin, Geraldine Ferraro. The only way it would really make history is if it is a black woman.”

AHEAD OF VP PICK, BIDEN UP 10 POINTS OVER TRUMP: POLL

“Well, Andrea, let me just say, I'm optimistic that he will make the right choice and he will choose from among a pool of very capable and talented potential running mates, someone who will really contribute to making history by making great decisions and by being a very strong and capable leader,” the senator from Delaware continued.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN ASSEMBLES VP STAFF AHEAD OF NAMING RUNNING MATE

Coons said whoever Biden picks as a running mate will help shape how his administration responds to the pandemic, the economic downturn and the “very real concerns about racial injustice and inequality.”

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With the Democratic National Convention less than a week away, the Biden campaign is expected to announce a vice presidential decision at any moment. The campaign announced Tuesday a team of nine Democratic strategists and operatives who will help the eventual running mate handle the responsibilities.

Biden announced early on that he was planning on choosing a woman as his running mate, but in the wake of racial tension after George Floyd's death in Minnesota, some Democrats believe he should choose a woman of color.

"He better pick a black woman," Democratic National Committee Black Caucus chair Virgie Rollins told Politico.

Minority candidates on Biden's reported shortlist have included Sen. Kamala Harris, Reps. Karen Bass and Val Demings, former National Security Adviser Susan Rice and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Fox News' Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Original Article

Biden taps Kamala Harris as running mate, setting aside tensions from primary

closeJoe Biden names Kamala Harris as VP pickVideo

Joe Biden names Kamala Harris as VP pick

Lawrence Jones reacts to Joe Biden naming Kamala Harris as his 2020 running mate

Kamala Harris, the politically shrewd California senator with a law enforcement background that has caused some tensions with the progressive left, was announced Tuesday as Joe Biden’s running mate.

She makes history as the first Black woman to serve as a major political party’s VP pick. The Biden campaign said Biden and Harris will deliver remarks together on Wednesday in Wilmington, Delaware.

"I’ve decided that Kamala Harris is the best person to help me take this fight to Donald Trump and Mike Pence and then to lead this nation starting in January 2021," Biden said in an email to supporters.

Biden also tweeted: "I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked @KamalaHarris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate."

He added: "Back when Kamala was Attorney General, she worked closely with Beau. I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse. I was proud then, and I'm proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign."

The decision, following months of secret meetings and closely held deliberations, would indicate the former vice president is setting aside their friction from the primary campaign. Harris memorably drew sharp contrasts with Biden when she challenged him on the debate stage over his past resistance to federally mandated desegregation busing.

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEN. KAMALA HARRIS

The now-presumptive Democratic presidential nominee’s selection amounts to a vote of confidence in the senator’s political ability and her background, and a willingness to move past the bad blood. The decision may have been tipped days earlier, when he was photographed with talking points saying of Harris that he does “not hold grudges” and has “great respect for her.”

The choice also fulfills a commitment the former vice president made in March to name a woman as running mate. Naming a Black woman at a time when issues of racial inequality are front-and-center also responds to signals from some circles in the party that such a choice could help build bridges with the Black community.

The timing gives Biden plenty of space to re-introduce her to voters ahead of this month’s scaled-back Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Biden’s naming of 55-year old Harris as his running mate comes 13 months after she flattened him on the debate stage in Miami at the first Democratic presidential primary showdown.

Biden selects Kamala Harris as running mateVideo

During the debate, Harris criticized comments by the former vice president spotlighting his ability to find common ground during the 1970s with segregationist senators with whom he disagreed, and his opposition decades ago to federally mandated school busing.

“Do you agree today that you were wrong to oppose busing in America?” Harris asked Biden during the debate.

HARRIS TAKES DOWN BIDEN AT FIRST DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY DEBATE

And in a line that went viral, she spotlighted that “there was a little girl in California who was a part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day. And that little girl was me.”

Biden, who served eight years as vice president to Barack Obama, the first Black president in U.S. history, and who’s enjoyed strong support from African-American voters as he makes his third bid for president, angrily said the senator’s comments were “a mischaracterization” of his position.

Biden’s poll numbers briefly edged down after the debate – and Harris enjoyed a short-lived surge in the polls. But her campaign faltered later in the year, and Harris ended her White House bid last December.

By the time she suspended her campaign, the relationship between Harris and Biden had improved. Biden has publicly praised Harris numerous times – and has repeatedly pointed out that he’s thought highly of her since she became close to his late son, Beau Biden, when they both served as attorney general of their respective states.

Harris ended up endorsing Biden and appeared on stage with him – along with another former rival, Sen. Cory Booker of New Jerseyat a rally in Michigan on the eve of that state’s March 10 primary, which the former vice president ended up winning decisively as he moved closer to locking up the Democratic nomination.

“I believe in Joe. I believe in Joe,” Harris said at the rally. “I know Joe. And that’s why I’m supporting him.”

The rally was Biden’s last before the coronavirus pandemic swept across the country, shutting down in-person campaigning. Since then, Harris has campaigned virtually for Biden, headlining online events and fundraisers.

While the Harris-Biden feud now seems like ancient history, what may still be relevant is her prosecutorial record as San Francisco district attorney and later as California attorney general.

Even before she announced her White House bid in January of last year, Harris’ record as a “progressive prosecutor” was being scrutinized and criticized by some on the left.

And that record was in the spotlight at last summer’s second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, as the senator faced withering attacks from Biden and another rival, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii.

The former vice president accused Harris of keeping nonviolent prisoners behind bars during her tenure as California attorney general because they were a source of cheap labor for the state.

“What happened? Along came a federal judge and said enough is enough and he freed 1,000 of these people,” Biden said as he argued that Harris was forced by a judge to release the prisoners.

Gabbard also jumped in to land heavy blows – accusing Harris of keeping “people in prison beyond their sentences to use them as cheap labor for the state of California.”

While the intra-party rifts from 2019 appear to have healed long ago, the attacks from past primary debates could be used as ammunition by President’s Trump’s campaign and allied groups to target Biden and Harris. And it remains unclear whether the progressive flank of the party will embrace her.

Harris, who was elected to the Senate in 2016, grabbed plenty of attention two years later for her grilling of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh during his contentious confirmation hearings.

Harris was a co-sponsor last year of The Green New Deal.

As a presidential candidate, she announced her support for the federal legalization of marijuana. The senator was an original co-sponsor of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ single-payer “Medicare-for-all” bill, which if enacted would essentially eliminate private insurance. But she moderated her stance during her nearly year-long White House bid. Harris took a political hit last summer when she introduced a health care plan that allowed for private insurance to co-exist with a government run system.

The senator’s called for a national moratorium on the death penalty. And on gun violence, Harris has proposed a ban on importing AR-15-style assault weapons and supported a national buyback program for such weapons. She also said on the campaign trail that if elected president, she would sign executive orders requiring enhanced background checks for weapons purchases if Congress failed to act.

Choosing a running mate is arguably the most consequential decision a presidential candidate can make.

Biden announced in March during a one-on-one Democratic primary debate with Sen. Bernie Sanders that if he won the nomination, he’d name a woman as his running mate.

And the former vice president emphasized for months that he needed to choose a running mate who’s “simpatico with where I am,” pointing to his own strong relationship with former President Obama during their eight years together steering the country.

Starting in late May, after the outbreak of protests in cities nationwide over systemic racism sparked by the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died while in police custody, the volume was turned up on calls for Biden to name a black woman as the Democratic Party’s vice presidential nominee.

Biden told reporters during a rare news conference at the beginning of July that he had prepared a list of “women of color” for consideration – but he wouldn’t announce a decision until August.

Three weeks later he acknowledged that of those he was considering for this running mate, “among them there are four Black women.” The former vice president made his comments during an MSNBC interview.

Among the other Black candidates Biden was thought to be considering were Rep. Val Demings of Florida, who is a former Orlando police chief; Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms; former Georgia House leader and 2018 gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams, former U.S. ambassador to the U.N. under President Obama Susan Rice; and Rep. Karen Bass of California.

Biden was also thought to be considering progressive Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who was a Biden rival during the Democratic nomination race; Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin; and Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, the first Thai-born woman elected to Congress and an Iraq war veteran who lost both of her legs piloting helicopters in combat. Also believed to be on his list were Govs. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan and Michelle Lujan Grisham of New Mexico.

Many of the other contenders congratulated Harris on Twitter after the announcement was made.

Biden’s naming of his running mate came just several days before the Democratic National Convention is scheduled to kick off in Milwaukee on Aug. 17.

Then-Sen. Barack Obama named Biden as his running mate just three days before the 2008 Democratic convention. And Donald Trump named then-Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate three days before the 2016 Republican convention.

Fox News' Alex Pappas contributed to this report.

Original Article

John Kasich says ‘conscience’ compelled him to speak at DNC, GOP is ‘my vehicle but never my master’

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Fox News Flash top headlines for August 11

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

Former Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich told CNN Monday he "had to search my conscience" before agreeing to speak at next week's Democratic National Convention in support of presumptive nominee Joe Biden.

CNN anchor Burnett disclosed that Kasich had written in then-Sen. John McCain's name for president in 2016, "which is a far cry from actually supporting the Democratic candidate for president.

DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED AS BIDEN MULLS VP CHOICE

"You were anti-Trump but you were not taking that extra step. What changed?" she asked.

"Conscience, Erin," Kasich responded. "The reason I didn't support Trump the last time is I was afraid that he would be a divider and not a unifier — and our best leaders historically have been unifiers, Republicans and Democrats. But unfortunately, as I've watched him over the last three-and-a-half years now, he's continued to do that and I don't think the country does well when we're divided.

CNN'S DON LEMON, KASICH HAVE HEATED EXCHANGE OVER TRUMP'S CORONAVIRUS ADDRESS

"And so, I had to search my conscience. When the Democrats asked me to speak, I had to think about it, and I believe that we need a new direction. We just can't keep going the way that we're going," he added.

When Burnett asked him about potential blowback, Kasich said leaders should be "prepared to walk a lonely road."

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"If you're not prepared to walk a lonely road and do the things that your conscience tells you to do, then how do you think about yourself when you look in the mirror?" Kasich asked.

"I mean, I'm comfortable with the decisions I make," he added. "Of course, there's blowback … This is not an unusual place for me to be. I've been a reformer almost all of my life. I've been very independent and I'm a Republican but the Republican Party has always been my vehicle but never my master. You have to do what you think is right in your heart and I'm comfortable here."

Original Article

Larry Elder: Joe Biden has been lying about his civil rights record for decades

closeLarry Elder: Cops are pulling back and the bad guys know itVideo

Larry Elder: Cops are pulling back and the bad guys know it

Talk radio host Larry Elder discusses the 'Ferguson effect' on policing in America and reacts to Black leaders demanding Joe Biden choose a Black female running mate.

Presumptive Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has been lying about his civil rights record for decades, said radio talk show host Larry Elder on Tuesday.

“He lied saying he got arrested trying to see Nelson Mandela, he lied saying the NAACP had supported him in every single one of his races when, in fact, the NAACP as a nonprofit can’t support anybody in any race,” Elder told “Fox & Friends.”

“He has been lying and lying and lying about his record, which shows you he thinks of Black people as props, designed to manipulate, tell them anything you want,” Elder said.

HERE'S WHO BIDEN MAY BE CONSIDERING AS HIS RUNNING MATE

Elder's comments came after Trump said Americans typically don’t vote based on a presidential candidate’s running mate, but Biden, the Democratic presumptive nominee, “has got some pretty big things going on,” so his selection could be more significant than in years past.

Biden’s presidential campaign is likely to announce his running mate this week, once he's done interviewing every finalist to run with him in November, The New York Times reported Monday.

“In the end, I don’t think it’s going to matter. Joe’s going to have to stand on his own two feet,” Trump said. “I don’t know who he is going to pick. In theory, it doesn’t matter much, but maybe with him, it probably matters much more than it normally does, for the obvious reason.”

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Joe Biden edges closer to VP pick announcement as DNC releases list of convention speakersVideo

Elder said that Trump has “flipped the narrative” by facilitating a flourishing economy and signing the police reform measure the First Step Act.

“The First Step act has allowed something like 5,000 mostly Black men busted for crack cocaine to have their sentences reconsidered. Two thousand of them have been released. He’s done more money for historically black colleges, increased money for enterprise zones, doing something about choice in school, and, for crying out loud, he wants to stop the competition of illegal aliens that pose competition for jobs and puts downward pressure for jobs that otherwise would be held by unskilled Black and Brown people in the inner city.

"For all these reasons, I believe, it doesn’t really matter what Joe Biden does. I think Trump is going to get a much higher percentage of the Black vote than he did last time.”

Fox News’ Alex Pappas contributed to this report.

Original Article

Could Kanye even theoretically win? Missed ballot deadlines seem to erase any path

closeKanye West suggests campaign is meant to hurt BidenVideo

Kanye West suggests campaign is meant to hurt Biden

Rapper Kanye West hints his presidential campaign is designed to spoil former Vice President Joe Biden’s bid to unseat President Trump; Jonathan Hunt reports.

Kanye West's bizarre bid for the White House has hit a major roadblock — if his goal was ever to become president, rather than play spoiler against Joe Biden.

It appears West's name won't be on enough state ballots to even make it mathematically possible to reach the necessary 270 electoral votes for a potential victory, after apparently failing to gather enough petition signatures to appear on the ballot in California, and elsewhere.

West has already suggested in an interview that his candidacy is meant to hurt Biden by siphoning off votes from the Democrat — though he later said he wants to "win." But now his seemingly pipedream presidential aspirations have suffered a big setback for any potential pathway to the presidency.

To get on the ballot in California as an independent candidate, West would have needed to turn in nomination papers signed by 196,964 registered voters by the close of business Friday to various county election officials. As of Tuesday, a California election official told Fox News no counties had reported signatures from West's campaign to the state. Not making the ballot means West loses any shot at the state's electoral college prize of 55 votes.

WHAT IS KANYE UP TO? WEST VOWS HE’S IN IT TO WIN, AS INTERVIEW SUGGESTS EFFORT TO DING BIDEN

West also didn't turn in any paperwork to state election officials in Washington state and Connecticut — which also had a Friday deadline for independent candidates. That means he won't be on the ballot there and loses access to 12 electoral votes in Washington and seven in Connecticut.

"My understanding is that West has already missed enough deadlines that he has no path to 270 electoral votes," Kyle Kondik from the University of Virginia Center for Politics told Fox News Tuesday on the state of West's campaign. "And even in places where he has submitted signatures, there are questions about the validity of those signatures."

FILE - Rapper Kanye West wears a Make America Great again hat during a meeting with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Oct. 11, 2018. West says he is no longer a Trump supporter. The rapper, who once praised Trump, tells Forbes in a story published July 8, 2020, that he is “taking the red hat off” — a reference to Trump’s trademark red “Make America Great Again” cap. West also insisted that his announcement that he’s running for President was not a stunt to drum up interest in an upcoming album. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

FILE – Rapper Kanye West wears a Make America Great again hat during a meeting with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Oct. 11, 2018. West says he is no longer a Trump supporter. The rapper, who once praised Trump, tells Forbes in a story published July 8, 2020, that he is “taking the red hat off” — a reference to Trump’s trademark red “Make America Great Again” cap. West also insisted that his announcement that he’s running for President was not a stunt to drum up interest in an upcoming album. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Indeed, in states where West and his advocates tried to make the deadlines, he's faced challenges regarding invalid signatures that bounced him from the ballot in New Jersey and his native state of Illinois.

Adding to the intrigue of West's mercurial 2020 campaign is that known GOP operatives have been working on West's behalf. It's seen as an apparent effort to play spoiler in swing states by taking away potential votes for Biden and helping President Trump win a second term.

The most visible example of that was in the critical Midwest state of Wisconsin, which Trump won in 2016. A GOP operative who has worked for the Republican Party and Trump, Lane Ruhland, was the person who dropped off the signatures last Tuesday to get West on the ballot, Vice reported.

But West is facing a tough legal challenge from the Wisconsin Democratic Party, which contends the West campaign turned in the signatures late and therefore should be disqualified from the November ballot. The deadline was 5 p.m. Aug. 4 and the rep for West turned them in 14 seconds late, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The challenge also charges that West had invalid signatures such as "Mickey Mouse" and "Bernie Sanders."

A lawyer for the West campaign, however, argued in paperwork filed in Wisconsin that the entertainer belongs on the ballot even if the petitions were just seconds late because the drop-off was hindered by state election officials, who locked their agency's door, and an "overly aggressive" media and Democratic operative, the paper reported.

In addition to being an important swing state were a few thousand votes could determine the next occupant of the White House, Wisconsin has 10 electoral votes at play.

KANYE WEST MISSES THE BALLOT IN HIS HOME STATE OF ILLINOIS

"Given that it appears that West’s bid is being aided by GOP operatives, it seems that Republicans believe West being on the ballot will hurt Biden more than Trump," Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, said. "But I’m not sure we can be so sure. West’s political stances are — for lack of a better term — odd, and he comes across as more conservative than liberal. I could imagine him receiving protest votes from people who are both liberal and conservative."

West has highlighted his Christian faith and anti-abortion stances. His 10-point presidential platform includes restoring prayer in classrooms, reforming the police, reducing household debt and maintaining a strong defense.

"The West campaign definitely merits watching, but there still is a lot up in the air about where he’ll be on the ballot," Kondik said. "He most definitely will not be the next president, but it is not out of the question that his strange campaign could have some bearing on the outcome in a given state."

Tucker: Most compelling voice against abortion is Kanye WestVideo

Adding more mystery to the seriousness of his campaign is West's choice for vice president.

In recent filing papers, West lists his Cody, Wyo., ranch as his home residence. He also names fellow Cody resident Michelle Tidball, a 57-year-old spiritual coach, as his running mate.

Heather Krubeck, Tidball's daughter, says her mom was taken aback that West chose her.

"I will tell you this. Michelle had no idea that West was naming her as his running mate," Krubeck wrote to Fox News. "She even asked him to change his announcement."

There's a total of 538 votes in the Electoral College. A majority — or 270 electoral votes — is needed to win. Each state's number of electoral votes is determined by population, with California having the most at stake with 55 votes and smaller states like Wyoming having three electoral votes up for grabs.

KANYE WEST DROPPED FROM NEW JERSEY BALLOT CONSIDERATION FOR INVALID SIGNATURES

West has met the filing deadline in Oklahoma (7 electoral votes), Missouri (10), Arkansas (6), West Virginia (5), Vermont (3), Wisconsin (10), Ohio (18) and Colorado (9). Assuming he survives legal challenges and makes the ballot in all of them, that would give him a potential shot at 68 total electoral votes.

In addition to California, Connecticut and Washington, West has already missed the cutoff in Michigan, South Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, South Dakota, Alaska, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Kansas, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Nevada and Pennsylvania.

Fox News' Andrew Craft contributed to this report.

Original Article

McConnell tries to hold the line on lawsuits

closeMitch McConnell says negotiations on COVID relief are progressing but two sides remain 'long way apart'Video

Mitch McConnell says negotiations on COVID relief are progressing but two sides remain 'long way apart'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell joins Mike Emanuel with insight on 'Special Report.'

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On the roster: McConnell tries to hold the line on lawsuits – Biden keeps ‘em waiting – Trump shaves deficit from 13 to 10 in Monmouth Poll – Omar faces voters in Minnesota primary – Canadian crime spree
MCCONNELL TRIES TO HOLD THE LINE ON LAWSUITS
Bloomberg: “Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s insistence that legal liability protections for businesses, schools and colleges be included in any new coronavirus relief bill is approaching a moment of reckoning. Warning that an avalanche of litigation would undercut any rebound from the pandemic’s economic damage, McConnell has repeatedly said he won’t let a bill to pass the Senate without a temporary shield from most coronavirus-related lawsuits for businesses that follow public health guidelines. But the proposal remains in limbo with talks on a stimulus package stalled. Action by President Donald Trump over the weekend to at least partially extend expired unemployment aid and defer payroll taxes failed to spur any new negotiations between Democrats and the White House. McConnell and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer on Monday exchanged blame but no new ideas on breaking the deadlock. McConnell’s view that that liability protections must be part of any eventual deal doesn’t appear to be shared by Trump, who’s been non-committal on the issue.”
Governors leery of Trump’s unemployment money – NYT: “Governors across the United States struggled on Monday with how to make good on President Trump’s order that their economically battered states deliver billions more in unemployment benefits to jobless residents. Democrats were harshly critical of Mr. Trump’s order, which he signed on Saturday night after talks with Congress on a broad new pandemic aid package collapsed. But even Republican governors said the order could put a serious strain on their budgets and worried it would take weeks for tens of millions of unemployed Americans to begin seeing the benefit. Congress initially provided a $600-a-week supplement to unemployment benefits when the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the United States in March. But that benefit lapsed on July 31, after talks between the White House and Congress broke down. Republicans had pushed for a $400 supplemental benefit, Democrats said it was not enough, and so on Saturday Mr. Trump ordered the $400 benefit — but said it was contingent on states to come up with $100 of that on their own.”
Extra unemployment benefits added up to a quarter trillion – WSJ: “The federal government spent nearly $250 billion on extra $600-a-week unemployment benefits from early April to the end of July, the Labor Department said, as millions of workers were laid off because of the coronavirus pandemic. Workers who permanently lost their jobs, were furloughed or had their hours cut were able to tap $600 in federal unemployment benefits on top of the amount they qualified for from the state, under a relief law Congress passed and President Trump signed in March. The benefits expired on July 31. Mr. Trump on Saturday signed an executive order that would replace the larger payments with $300 a week in enhanced unemployment benefits, and called on states to provide another $100 a week. The White House remained deadlocked Monday over a broader pandemic relief deal with Democratic lawmakers, who said the president’s moves over the weekend were an unconstitutional breach of congressional spending powers.”
Employers face big risks on payroll tax delay – WSJ: “Employers considering President Trump’s plan to allow deferred payment of payroll taxes face a series of costs, uncertainties and headaches. The president wants employers to stop collecting the 6.2% levy that is the employee share of Social Security taxes for many workers, starting Sept. 1 and going through the end of the year. But his move… doesn’t change how much tax employees and employers actually owe. Only Congress can do that. Employers’ biggest worry: If they stop withholding taxes without any guarantee that Congress will actually forgive any deferred payments, they could find themselves on the hook. That is a particular risk in cases where employees change jobs and employers can’t withhold more taxes from later paychecks to catch up on missed payments. … ‘Liability is going to stick to the employer like flies to flypaper,’ [said Marianna Dyson, a lawyer at Covington & Burling LLP in Washington who specializes in payroll taxes].”
College football faces decision time – Sports Illustrated: “A potential shutdown of college football evoked an outpouring of support Monday for playing a 2020 season, from the President of the United States to the head coach at Ohio State, sending a divided sport’s nation into what could be a Tuesday of cataclysmic conference decisions. Or another day of delayed action. Nothing is certain. Adhering to its fractured nature, the NCAA’s richest five conferences formed factions over the idea of playing a season this fall or not, splitting off into warring parties: the Pac-12 and Big Ten are expected to cancel or postpone their seasons; the SEC and ACC would like to play; and the Big 12 is ‘really split,’ according to multiple sources. A divided conference sitting between other divided conferences is a fitting metaphor for the entire sport.”
THE RULEBOOK: FEDERALISM IS BETTER
“An entire consolidation of the States into one complete national sovereignty would imply an entire subordination of the parts; and whatever powers might remain in them, would be altogether dependent on the general will.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 32
TIME OUT: OF CONS AND CONFIRMATION BIAS
The Atlantic: “At a September 2012 academic conference in Rome, Karen King, a historian at Harvard Divinity School, made a major announcement. She had discovered a fragment of papyrus that bore a shocking phrase: ‘Jesus said to them, My wife.’ … The journalist Ariel Sabar covered King’s 2012 presentation for Smithsonian magazine, and [later] tracked down the owner of the papyrus – a man whose identity King adamantly refused to share with the press. Could this man have forged the explosive text? Was King’s discovery too good to be true? …Sabar’s Atlantic article prompted King to admit that the papyrus was probably a forgery. ‘I had no idea about this guy, obviously,’ King told Sabar of the papyrus’s owner. ‘He lied to me.’ Sabar, for his part, kept reporting. Today he published Veritas: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.”
Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.
SCOREBOARD
NATIONAL HEAD-TO-HEAD AVERAGE
Trump: 40.6 percent
Biden: 51.4 percent
Size of lead: Biden by 10.8 points
Change from one week ago: Biden 0.4 points, Trump no change in points
[Average includes: Monmouth University: Trump 41% – Biden 51%; Fox News: Trump 41% – Biden 49%; ABC/WaPo: Trump 44% – Biden 54%; Quinnipiac University: Trump 37% – Biden 52%; NBC News/WSJ: Trump 40% – Biden 51%.]
BATTLEGROUND POWER RANKINGS
(270 electoral votes needed to win)
Toss-up: (109 electoral votes): Wisconsin (10), Ohio (18), Florida (29), Arizona (11), Pennsylvania (20), North Carolina (15), Iowa (6)
Lean R/Likely R: (180 electoral votes)
Lean D/Likely D: (249 electoral votes)
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 40.8 percent
Average disapproval: 56.8 percent
Net Score: -16 points
Change from one week ago: no change in points
[Average includes: Fox News: 45% approve – 54% disapprove; ABC News/WaPo: 40% approve – 58% disapprove; Gallup: 41% approve – 56% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 36% approve – 60% disapprove; NBC News/WSJ: 42% approve – 56% disapprove.]
GOT A WILD PITCH? READY TO THROW A FASTBALL?
We’ve brought “From the Bleachers” to video on demand thanks to Fox Nation. Each Wednesday and Friday, Producer Brianna McClelland will put Politics Editor Chris Stirewalt to the test with your questions on everything about politics, government and American history – plus whatever else is on your mind. Sign up for the Fox Nation streaming service here and send your best questions to HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM.
BIDEN KEEPS ‘EM WAITING
NYT: “Joseph R. Biden Jr. has told allies that he has interviewed every finalist in his vice-presidential search, and his advisers are planning an announcement for the middle of the week, people briefed on the selection process said on Monday. In a sign that the choice is now in Mr. Biden’s hands alone, the four-member committee that screened his potential running mates is said to have effectively disbanded — its work is complete, Biden allies said, and there is little left to do except for Mr. Biden to make up his mind. Mr. Biden’s political team has prepared rollout plans for several of the finalists, and he is expected to announce his decision as soon as Tuesday, though more Democrats expect it to come on Wednesday. The former vice president, however, has not been known for his punctuality so far in the presidential race and the timeline could well slip again. Mr. Biden has spoken with the vice-presidential candidates through a combination of in-person sessions and remote meetings over the last few weeks, but the exact timing and circumstances of all of the meetings are not clear. Close advisers to Mr. Biden said he had been directly in touch with all of the leading candidates.”
Beschloss: What a running mate can do – WaPo: “By substituting Truman as vice president in 1944 for the dreamy, left-leaning incumbent, Henry Wallace, Roosevelt hoped to show that his postwar administration would be more centrist because after a time of tumult, ‘you have to digest it.’ At the 1952 Republican convention, after narrowly besting conservative Ohio Sen. Robert Taft, Dwight D. Eisenhower united the party by anointing Nixon, who — although he had secretly favored Eisenhower — was popular with the Taft wing. In 1976, President Gerald Ford, who had almost been defeated by Ronald Reagan in Kansas City, accepted Reagan’s suggestion that he choose conservative Kansas Sen. Robert Dole, which made it so much easier for many bitter-end Reaganites to support the ticket that Ford nearly won in November. Four years later, when Reagan became the nominee, he immediately positioned himself as a more centrist national candidate by selecting his more moderate ex-rival, George H.W. Bush.”
Democratic convention speakers announced – Fox News: “…[The] Democratic National Convention revealed more details Tuesday about the lineup of events and speakers at this year's event. … The former vice president is set to speak on the final night of the event from his home state of Delaware. …[The] convention will kick off Monday with speakers including Biden's primary opponents Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, former first lady Michelle Obama and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich… Tuesday's lineup includes former President Bill Clinton, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., former acting attorney general Sally Yates, former secretary of state John Kerry and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. … Wednesday's speakers are scheduled to include House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama. There is also a spot for the as-yet-unnamed vice presidential nominee. Thursday, the convention concludes with appearances by Biden's primary opponents Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg and others.”
TRUMP SHAVES DEFICIT FROM 13 TO 10 IN MONMOUTH POLL
Monmouth University: “TheMonmouth University Pollalso finds that Joe Biden currently holds a 10-point lead over Donald Trump in the presidential race. Biden is currently supported by 51% of registered voters and Trump by 41% … while 4% of voters are undecided. This is similar to the Democrat’s late June lead of 52% to 39% … Biden’s edge stood at 52% to 41% in early June, 50% to 41% in May, 48% to 44% in April, and 48% to 45% in March. Slightly more voters say they are certain about their support for Biden (39%) than say the same about Trump (35%). This is similar to the ‘firm support’ gap in late June, when it was 40% Biden to 34% Trump. Fully half (50%) of registered voters continue to say they are not at all likely to support the incumbent (identical 50% in late June), while 40% say the same about the challenger (39% in late June).”
Wisconsin remains tight – Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: “Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden leads President Donald Trump in Wisconsin, according to Tuesday's Marquette University Law School Poll. Among likely voters, those who say they're absolutely certain they'll cast ballots in the fall, Biden holds a 49% to 44% advantage over Trump. Among registered voters, Biden had a 6-point lead, poll director Charles Franklin said. In last month's survey, Biden led Trump by 49% to 41% among registered voters. At this same point in the 2016 race in Wisconsin, the Marquette Poll showed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton leading Trump by 10 percentage points among registered voters and 15 points among likely voters. Trump narrowly won the state in the general election and claimed the White House.”
Some elections officials turn to ballot drop boxes – NPR: “Many voters are worried about casting their ballots in person this November because of the pandemic. They're also concerned that their mail-in ballots could be misplaced or delayed. One voting option that's gaining popularity — and also attracting controversy — is the use of drop boxes, where voters can deposit their absentee ballots to be collected later by election officials. … Michigan had hundreds of drop boxes available for its primary after more than 1 million voters decided to cast absentee ballots rather than go to the polls.”
No change in New Jersey turnout despite mass mailing ballots – NJ.com: “More New Jerseyans voted last month than in any presidential primary but one, but the percentage of those participating remained the same as four years earlier even as the state sent mail ballots to every registered Democrat and Republican. Almost 1.5 million voters cast ballots either in person or by mail, second only to the 1.7 million who voted in 2008, according to newly released figures from the state Division of Elections.”
OMAR FACES VOTERS IN MINNESOTA PRIMARY
Fox News: “Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin hold primaries on Tuesday, with Georgia holding a Republican primary runoff in the state’s 14th Congressional District. But the race grabbing the most national attention is in Minnesota, where Rep. Ilhan Omar – one of the four members of the group of progressive first-term congresswomen of color known coast to coast as ‘The Squad’ – is facing a Democratic primary challenge from a candidate who’s vastly outraised the incumbent. The firebrand freshman lawmaker quickly became a nationally known politician two years ago as one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress – and for her outspoken criticism of President Trump. But the attention surrounding the Somali born progressive lawmaker – and her Twitter feed – have made her a target of Republicans and even some fellow Democrats. And Omar’s no stranger to controversy, apologizing early in her congressional tenure for making comments viewed as anti-Semitic.”
Georgia Republicans may pick conspiracy theorist for House seat – AP: “A Republican criticized for promoting racist videos and adamantly supporting the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory faces a neurosurgeon who campaigned on his experience to improve the health care system in Tuesday’s GOP primary runoff for an open U.S. House seat representing northwest Georgia. The results could indicate just how far candidates can push the limits of political rhetoric in the age of President Donald Trump before triggering a backlash from voters. Businesswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene and Dr. John Cowan have both positioned themselves as staunch Trump supporters, pushing anti-abortion, pro-gun and pro-border wall messages. But while Cowan has taken a more traditional campaign approach, Greene has found a loyal following — and controversy — by sharing video chats and social posts expressing racist, Islamophobic and anti-Semitic views.”
BLACK LIVES MATTER LEADER BACKS CHICAGO LOOTING
WMAQ: “Members of Black Lives Matter held a solidarity rally on Monday night with the more than 100 individuals who were arrested after a night of looting and unrest in Chicago. The rally was held at the South Loop police station where organizers say those individuals are currently being held in custody. ‘I don’t care if someone decides to loot a Gucci or a Macy’s or a Nike store, because that makes sure that person eats,’ Ariel Atkins, a BLM organizer, said. ‘That makes sure that person has clothes.’ … ‘That is reparations,’ Atkins said. ‘Anything they wanted to take, they can take it because these businesses have insurance.’ Chicago police believe the looting began after officers shot a man in the city’s Englewood neighborhood on Sunday afternoon. Authorities say the man, identified as 20-year-old Latrell Allen, had a gun and fired at police before they returned fire, striking and wounding him.”
Seattle chief resigns after de-funding measure – KOMO: “Police Chief Carmen Best announced her stunning retirement Monday evening from the department in the wake of Seattle City Council voting to defund her department by 14 percent. Best said her retirement from the Seattle Police Department will be effective Sept. 2 in an email to staffers in the department. The police chief's retirement follows the City Council proposing deep cuts to her pay and the compensation for 12 members of her command staff. Best, the first Black woman to lead the Seattle Police Department, was appointed the city's police chief in July 2018. She spent 28 years with the Seattle Police Department. ‘This was a difficult decision for me, but when it's time, it's time,’ Best wrote in the email. ‘I want to thank Mayor Durkan for her continuous support through good times and tough times.’”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
Nightmare scenario: Puerto Rico primary ends with inconclusive chaos – NYT
Pergram: Coronavirus bill a monster lift that worries lawmakers on ballot box and economy – Fox News
AUDIBLE: OBVIOUSLY
“Obviously, Joe Biden is spending the day scrolling through Twitter, checking out what everyone has to say about who he should pick.” – The Atlantic’s Edward-Isaac Dovere tweeted on Tuesday.
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“No reputable poll has had Trump within 6 points of Biden in Wisconsin since May. President Trump won the state in 2016 by less than 23,000 votes. Since then, Senator Tammy Baldwin (D) kept her seat in 2018 by more than 10 points. Governor Tony Evers (D) unseated incumbent Scott Walker. In fact, Democrats won all constitutional statewide offices on the ballot in 2018 (including Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, and State Treasurer), the first to happen in Wisconsin since 1982. I’m not saying it’s a foregone conclusion by any means, and I will always defer to you political professionals to see the bigger picture. BUT, my question is simply: what will it take to move Wisconsin from toss-up to ‘Lean D?’ Asking for a friend in Waukesha.” – Ken Levine, Lionville, Pa.
[Ed. note: As you saw above, not only is the race in Wisconsin competitive, it’s getting more so. While your friend from Waukesha is quite right that Democrats have staged an impressive comeback after a decade of reversals in the Badger State, it is no sure thing for the Blue Team. Wisconsin looks to me like Trump’s best bet among the big three Upper Midwest states that flipped from blue to red in 2016.]
“Is there an intention to present the actual battleground scores, or will the projection remain static?” – Stan Zieg, Atlanta
[Ed. note: Those seem to be two different things, Mr. Zieg. The question about “scores” is easy: There aren’t any. Certainly we pay attention to state polls, but when it comes to competitive races there will never be anything like enough state-level polling to just rely on that. While polls certainly are part of our analysis, we are looking at other data as well including things like historical trends, registration numbers and contributions among others. But that does not mean that the rankings are static. We most recently shifted Iowa into the Toss-Up category, and any reasonable observer would know that it will soon be time for more changes as we enter the terminal phase of the campaign.]
“Yes, the civics lesson was much appreciated. I saw in a reader's letter [Monday] (the content of which I agreed with, though it would be agonizing) that she is saving it. I've saved a number of your reports, but I posted much of ‘What happens if there's no clear winner?’ on my Facebook page for friends and family across the spectrum. And yes, I gave you credit. I find myself looking forward to your report more eagerly every day, and I recommend it to many on both ‘sides.’ Keep up the good work!” – Chris Howard, Mesa, Ariz.
[Ed. note: Thank you, Mr. Howard! Just make sure to go take my name off of it if it turns out it’s wrong…]
Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.
CANADIAN CRIME SPREE
CTV: “Ottawa police say a man accused of robbing a bank on Rideau Street last week followed physical distancing protocols before allegedly slipping the teller a note. Police said they were called at around 11:30 a.m. Friday on reports a man had passed a note to a teller demanding cash. He left with an undisclosed amount before police arrived. Police said the suspect waited in line outside the bank, per COVID-19 protocols, before making the alleged demand once inside. A suspect was arrested a short time later without incident. Police said Davis Morris, 58, of Ottawa, is facing one count of robbery and appeared in court for a show cause hearing on Sunday.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“No, I don't go to [National’s] games to steel my spine, perfect my character, journey into the dark night of the soul. I get that in my day job watching the Obama administration in action.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in the Washington Post on April 23, 2010.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article

Maryland to drastically reduce number of polling places in November, despite gov’s concerns of disenfranchisement

closeGov. Hogan on Trump saying he'll delay 2020 election: It isn't helpful, only causes pandemoniumVideo

Gov. Hogan on Trump saying he'll delay 2020 election: It isn't helpful, only causes pandemonium

Trump suggests delaying election over mail-in ballot concerns; Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan weighs in.

Republican Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan authorized a plan on Monday night that will drastically reduce the number of in-person polling places in the state for the Nov. 3 presidential election after a weeks-long standoff with the state Board of Elections, which insisted on a plan involving far fewer voting locations due to coronavirus concerns.

Hogan, on the other hand, publicly worried that the plan for consolidated voting locations would actually increase the spread of the virus.

A proclamation issued by the governor late Monday will allow the board to set up "voting centers" that any eligible voter in that county may go to, instead of the traditional polling place model where voters are assigned a specific location where they may vote. This would include about 280 public schools serving as Election Day voting centers and about 80 early voting centers. These centers will be able to handle higher volumes of voters per election judge, meaning the state will be able to, in theory, handle the Election Day crowds despite a shortage of people volunteering to help run the state's election amid the pandemic.

RNC FILES EMERGENCY REQUEST WITH SUPREME COURT OVER REQUIREMENT FOR MAIL-IN BALLOTS

But Hogan authorized the plan reluctantly. In an accompanying letter, published by ABC 7, the governor registered his concern that "the Board's decision to close nearly 80% of polls will have the potential to create long lines and unsafe conditions, with crowds of people being forced into too few polling places."

That had been a problem during the June primary election in Maryland. So Hogan earlier this summer announced his intention to hold an election with every polling place open — in addition to the state sending absentee ballot applications to every voter and encouraging early voting — in order to curb lines. But the Board of Election resisted the plan for weeks before Hogan eventually issued his Monday proclamation.

Among the reasons the Board of Elections resisted Hogan's plan was the shortage of election judges. The Washington Post reported that as of last week the state had just over 60 percent of the number of judges it needed to hold an election.

But Hogan essentially accused the board of slow-walking efforts to recruit enough election judges to execute the plan — WBALTV reported that in some instances people would call the board to volunteer to be election judges and were told to call back later. The Board of Elections has said that it "encourages all interested citizens to apply to serve as election judges as elections.maryland.gov." Hogan further criticized the board for not sending out absentee ballot applications in a timely manner, which he directed the board to do.

In this June 3, 2020 file photo Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks during a news conference in Annapolis, Md. Hogan has been involved in a weeks-long standoff with his state Board of Elections over how to conduct the Nov. 3 presidential election. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, file)

In this June 3, 2020 file photo Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks during a news conference in Annapolis, Md. Hogan has been involved in a weeks-long standoff with his state Board of Elections over how to conduct the Nov. 3 presidential election. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, file)

MARYLAND GOV'S CORONAVIRUS 'FAILURE' ON NURSING-HOME INSPECTIONS DRAWS WH HEAT

"More than two months have passed," Hogan said in an Aug. 3 letter to the Board of Elections, referring to the problem-filled June primary, "and you still have not provided a plan for how you are going to conduct an election. This is your sole responsibility and your only job. Instead, we have seen two months of delay and deflection about why polls can't be opened, and why applications for ballots can't be mailed. There are media reports indicating that those who attempt to volunteer to staff the polls are told that there is uncertainly about if there is any need and that they should call back at a later time."

Another issue has been that many locations that typically serve as polling places are declining to do so amid the pandemic. Hogan also railed against the fact that in some minority communities, nearly all polling places could be closed if local officials get their way.

"We are very concerned about recent attempts to deny Marylanders the right to vote. Local leaders have suggested massive closures of polling places, particularly in some of our minority communities. This would likely result in voter suppression and disenfranchisement on a significant scale, disparately impacting Marylanders of color," Hogan said in an Aug. 3 letter. "Last week, we received a letter from Prince George's County — one of the nation's most predominant African American counties with a total of 900,000 residents — saying that they want to close 229 precincts and only open 15. Imagine 244 polling places all trying to jam into 15 locations while trying to distance and keep people safe."

MARYLAND GOV HOGAN CLASHES WITH OFFICIALS OVER COUNTY MANDATE FOR PRIVATE SCHOOLS TO GO VIRTUAL

Prince George's County Executive Angela Alsobrooks accused Hogan, in dismissing that request, of a "high disregard" of the fact her county has been hit hard by the coronavirus, in a statement reported by the Washington Post. She said the idea to consolidate polling locations was out of concern for the illness and to promote "a safe and responsible voting process for our citizens."

The consistent delays and confusion have led to calls for Maryland to join the eight states that are set to mail out actual ballots — not just applications — to every voter. It was one of the options the board presented in a report earlier this year and progressive groups like the ACLU of Maryland and Common Cause Maryland are calling on Hogan to mail ballots to every voter.

"It is still possible to prevent a potential public health disaster — not to mention voter suppression and a waste of millions of dollars — but Governor Hogan must act quickly," Common Cause Maryland Executive Director Joanne Antoine said in a Baltimore Sun op-ed co-written with Sam Novey, the co-founder of Baltimore Votes. "Election officials say they would need to change course by mid-August to begin the process of mailing ballots to all voters. If he refuses to act, more people will unnecessarily get sick and die, and history will remember Governor Hogan for this betrayal of leadership."

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But sending mail-in ballots would require a change in state law, and the governor has taken a position that the Board of Elections will need to conduct the election consistent with state law, without changes.

"As you know, existing state law requires polling places to be open on Election Day," Hogan said in the Aug. 3 letter. "It also requires eight days of early voting and opportunities for voters to request applications for absentee mail-in ballots. Under existing law, and to save voters the extra step of having to request an application for an absentee ballot, I directed you to promptly mail applications to every single Maryland registered voter. It has now been 26 days, and you have failed to take this action."

The board has said it should be able to send out the absentee ballot applications by the end of August.

Original Article

Ahead of VP pick, Biden up 10 points over Trump: poll

closeJoe Biden edges closer to VP pick announcement as DNC releases list of convention speakersVideo

Joe Biden edges closer to VP pick announcement as DNC releases list of convention speakers

Biden team reportedly wraps up running mate vetting process; Peter Doocy reports from Wilmington, Delaware.

As Joe Biden gets ready to announce his running mate, a new national survey indicates that the former vice president holds a 10-percentage point lead over President Trump among registered voters.

According to a Monmouth University poll released on Tuesday, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee tops the Republican incumbent in the White House 51%-41%. The survey indicates 4% of voters questioned are backing third party candidates, with 4% undecided.

TRUMP CAMPAIGN ARGUES THEY'RE BETTER POSITIONED THAN IN 2016, DESPITE POLLS AND CORONAVIRUS

Biden’s 10-point lead over the president is down from a 13-point advantage in Monmouth University’s previous poll, which was conducted in late June. The release of the new poll comes a day after a Georgetown University Battleground national survey suggested the former vice president topping Trump by 13 points.

An average of all the latest national polls compiled by Real Clear Politics indicates Biden ahead of Trump by 7.2 points. That's down from a 10-point advantage the presumptive Democratic nominee enjoyed in late June in the Real Clear Politics average.

"Trump has stopped his slide in the poll, but Biden maintains a lead among all registered voters nationally," Monmouth University Polling Institute director Patrick Murray highlighted.

WHAT THE LATEST FOX NEWS POLLING IN KEY BATTLEGROUND STATES SHOWS

Biden holds smaller single-digit advantages over Trump in the latest polling in many of the key general election battleground states that will decide the White House race. Hillary Clinton also led Trump in most national and key battleground state polling at this point in the 2016 cycle. The Democratic nominee ended up winning the national popular vote by two points – but Trump edged Clinton in many of the crucial swing states, giving him an electoral college victory to win the White House.

The president’s favorable/unfavorable rating stands at 40%-54% in the Monmouth poll, a slight improvement from late June. Biden’s favorable/unfavorable rating stands at 42%-47%, a slight decline from the previous Monmouth survey.

Just over 6 in 10 voters questioned in the survey said they’re very or somewhat confident that the general election will be conducted fairly and accurately, with 36% saying they’re not confident. Nearly three-quarters said they’re concerned about potential election meddling. A sizeable number of Democrats said they were worried about meddling from a foreign power, with 40% pointing fingers at Russia. They’re also concerned about meddling by the president and the GOP. A significant amount of Republicans worry about meddling from the Democratic Party.

The president has repeatedly claimed for months that the expansion of voting by mail will lead to a “rigged” election and “voter fraud.”

Fifty-eight percent of voters said it’s a good idea to make it easier to cast ballots by mail – amid health concerns over in-person voting amid the coronavirus pandemic. Thirty-seven percent said it’s a bad idea. There’s a wide partisan divide, with 90% of Democrats and 60% of independents but just 20% of Republicans in favor of making voting by mail easier.

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The Monmouth University Poll was conducted August 6-10, with live telephone operators questioning 785 registered voters nationwide. The survey’s sampling error is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

Original Article

Fla. schools reopening, Hillsborough School District opts for online only

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 10:51 AM PT – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Education and state officials across the nation are determining whether or not to allow children back to school.

Florida is one of many states gearing up to get kids back into the classroom come fall. However, not all of the state’s school districts are convinced this is safe.

The Hillsborough County School District has opted for online classes only. The move could cost the district to lose out on funding from the state for its school year.

However, Florida Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran is giving Hillsborough County a second chance by allowing the district to reconsider and switch to in-person learning by Friday. He said the county must go back to its original state approved plan, which gives parents and students a choice between online courses or attending in-person.

“For me, I think one of the core principles is parents need to have the ability to opt for the type of learning that they think is important,” said Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.). “And so, if they’re comfortable, more comfortable in a distance learning environment, then they obviously need to have that that choice.”

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis answers a question during a roundtable meeting with transportation industry leaders at the Hilton Orlando-Bonnet Creek Resort in Orlando, Fla., Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. DeSantis addressed coronavirus and state transportation construction concerns. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

Despite this, Corcoran is pushing for students to be present in classrooms five days a week. The Florida Education Association, however, said he has no right to tell individual districts how to run its schools.

Meanwhile, local teachers unions and teachers across the country are protesting reopenings by suggesting the move is far too dangerous. Nonetheless, state officials such as Corcoran have argued that continuing to keep schools closed will further prevent marginalized communities from closing the gap in education.

Hillsborough County is expected to make a decision before the end of this week.

RELATED: Parents turn to private schools amid COVID-19 pandemic

Original Article

President Trump: Democrat push for mail-in voting amounts to election meddling

President Donald Trump speaks at a news conference in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House, Monday, Aug. 10, 2020, in Washington. Trump briefly left because of a security incident outside the fence of the White House. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 11:12 AM PT – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

In a news conference on Monday, the president claimed the Democrat Party is trying to implement widespread mail-in voting for their own benefit. The president equated the Democrats’ pursuit of mail-in voting in the upcoming elections to foreign interference.

“I’ll tell you who’s meddling in our election, the Democrats are meddling,” said President Trump. “By wanting and insisting on sending mail-in ballots where there’s corruption all over the place.”

He and the Democrat Party have clashed on the issue of mail-in voting for several months now amid growing concerns about the impact the coronavirus pandemic will have on the election. President Trump, in the past, has also accused the Democrats of trying to steal the election by trying to relax voting regulations.

“Who would want a bill banning signature verification? What’s that all about?” he asked. “You know what it’s about? Fraud.”

The Republican National Committee has challenged the implementation of lax voting requirements by requesting the intervention of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Another key concern for the president’s campaign is the time frame of the presidential debates. The debates are set to start in late September, though some states such as North Carolina will begin sending out ballots earlier.

People close to the president, including Trump Organization executive Eric Trump, have argued the scheduling of the debates could benefit Joe Biden who he said is afraid and unprepared to debate the president.

“They’re messenger is Sleepy Joe, he doesn’t know its his message,” said President Trump. “He has no idea what the message is, but he’s going to do whatever they tell him to do, you know it, because he’s not all there.”

FILE – In this June 30, 2020, file photo, a box of absentee ballots wait to be counted at the Albany County Board of Elections in Albany, N.Y. Never before in U.S. history will so many people exercise the right on which their democracy hinges by marking a ballot at home and entrusting several layers of mostly unseen intermediaries to ensure their votes get accurately counted. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

Although five U.S. states already perform full mail-in voting, critics have questioned the ability of the U.S. Postal Service to handle a full scale mail-in voting election.

It’s still unclear as to what lasting effects, if any, the pandemic will have on the presidential election.

RELATED: Postmaster General DeJoy claims USPS can handle election mail surge

Original Article

American Workers First: President Trump’s executive order on relief

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:21 AM PT – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

After White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin held weeks of marathon meetings with opportunistic Democrats, President Trump took action on Saturday for the good of the American people.

One America News White House Correspondent Jenn Pellegrino has the latest reaction from Washington.

RELATED: President Trump signs 4 executive orders on COVID-19 relief

Original Article