Workers in India building wall ahead of President Trump’s visit

Indian workers construct a wall in front of a slum ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump’s visit, in Ahmadabad, India, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:15 PM PT — Thursday, February 13, 2020

Construction workers in India are building a wall ahead of President Trump’s visit later this month. The president is expected to attend an event in the country in the coming weeks.

Before his arrival, workers are expected to complete a seven-foot tall wall that will reportedly conceal slum communities. However, a government official said the wall is part of an ongoing “beautification and cleanliness” project. Officials also said the wall is being built for security purposes.

Some residents are already excited about the president’s upcoming arrival.

“We are very happy that Donald Trump is coming here. We are going to give him a warm welcome by making him wear a traditional scarf, which we make here. We are also going to do prayers and he is going to attend prayers of all faiths.” – Pratimaben Vohra, local museum guide

In this Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020 photo, Sardar Patel Gujarat Stadium stands illuminated, days before it is inaugurated in Ahmadabad, India. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)

Meanwhile, the Defense Department is transferring additional funds to the president’s U.S. border wall in an effort to increase security. On Thursday, the Pentagon said it’s moving $3.8 billion from several programs toward building the wall.

Officials said the funds are being pulled from its lower priority programs, such as the controversial F-35 fighter jet.

Democrats have denounced the wall as a “vanity project,” but immigration officials said it actually works to deter crime near the border. The Pentagon added the border wall has greatly reduced threats to U.S. national security as well.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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Hong Kong hospital workers end multiday strike

Protesters hold placards reads “Close the border, say no to China” during a protest at a mall in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 12:20 PM PT — Friday, February 7, 2020

Hundreds of health workers in Hong Kong have agreed to end their nearly week-long strike. On Friday, Hospital Authority Employees Alliance Chairwoman Winnie Yu apologized to everyone affected by the protests. She said the medical workers’ decision to return to their jobs wasn’t easy.

The union said they will instead continue to demand better protection against the deadly coronavirus and for the complete closure of the city’s border with mainland China, despite pushback from the city’s chief executive.

“I can’t see Hong Kong people suffering, we have to save them,” said one demonstrator. “Even (if) we don’t have enough protective equipment, we just want the government to promise us we can work safely.”

Hong Kong experienced its first coronavirus-related death this week. The city has reported at least 22 documented cases of the illness so far.

Pro-China supporters wearing masks urge government to deliver masks to local people during a protest in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Earlier in the week, hospital personnel in Hong Kong called out mainland China’s poor handling of the outbreak. The union denounced government efforts to contain the virus and threatened to strike.

Officials took specific aim at Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam, who they have called on to supply more medical equipment and ban all travel into China.

“The measures outlined at news conferences by the emergency committee led by Carrie Lam about border control, school closure, science and getting protective equipment aren’t going to solve the problem. If we don’t completely close the border, any suspected cases can come from mainland China into Hong Kong. The burden on our health care system will be much more than our current system can support.”

– Winnie Yu, Hospital Authority Employees Alliance Chairwoman

RELATED: China Deploys Cargo Planes Of Medical Workers And Supplies To Wuhan

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China deploys cargo planes of medical workers and supplies to Wuhan

In this photo released by China’s Xinhua News Agency, Chinese military medical staff members stand in formation after arriving at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020. (Cheng Min/Xinhua via AP)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:17 PM PT — Sunday, February 2, 2020

China is sending medical workers and supplies to Wuhan amid the coronavirus outbreak. On Sunday, the Chinese Air Force deployed eight cargo planes, which carried nearly 800 workers in total. Many of the workers previously helped treat the SARS outbreak.

According to reports, this is the largest non-military operation of the country’s air force since 2010.

China has confirmed more than 300 deaths from the virus while more than 130,000 are under medical observation. The city of Wuhan has been on lockdown for over a week to stop the spread of the virus.

The Huoshenshan temporary field hospital under construction is seen as it nears completion in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020. (Chinatopix via AP)

This came after hospital personnel in Hong Kong called out mainland China’s poor handling of the outbreak. On Saturday, the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance denounced government efforts to contain the virus and threatened to strike.

The union also said over 9,000 of its members supported participating in a five day protest. A group of officials took specific aim at Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam, who they have called on to supply more medical equipment and ban all travel into China.

“The measures outlined at news conferences by the emergency committee led by Carrie Lam about border control, school closure, science and getting protective equipment aren’t going to solve the problem. If we don’t completely close the border, any suspected cases can come from mainland China into Hong Kong. The burden on our health care system will be much more than our current system can support.”

– Winnie Yu, Hospital Authority Employees Alliance Chairwoman

In the meantime, rail connections to the mainland have been halted and Lam has not appeared willing to block all travel outright.

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